Skip to main content

Full text of "Cash Box"

See other formats


Show Business Mourns Senator Kennedy’s Death 

•••Disk Museum Spins Tale Of The Era Of 78’s 
• • • Editorial: 

The Way To A 
Summer Sales 

Festival ••• Sign Impressions & Their 
New Label Thru Buddah • • • Phil Rose Is 
Elected WB-7 Arts VP • • • Venice Jazz Gig 

BUDDAH; ALL FOR ONE, ONE FOR ALL Int'l. Section Begins Pg. 63 





STEVE 


DENNIS 


JIM 


FRANK 


MARK 


DAN 


DAWN 


BUTCH 


BOBBY 


JAMIE 


DALE 



























o 




What a homecoming 
for him. 

Burl’s just returned to the 
Columbia label and he’s already 
recorded a sure hit. 

You know it has to be, 
because it’s got that perfect 
combination: a great Dylan lyric 
\ ■ and an incomparable Burl Ives 

rendition. 

Burl Ives. On Columbia Records® 




Publication Office / 1780 Broadway, New York, New York 10019 / Telephone: JUdson 6-2640 / Cable Address: Cash Box, N. Y. 
GEORGE ALBERT 

President and Publisher 

MARTY OSTROW 

Pice President 

LEON SCHUSTER 

Treasurer 


IRV LICHTMAN 

Editor in Chief 

EDITORIAL 

TOM McENTEE Assoc. Editor 
DANIEL BOTTSTEIN 
JOHN KLEIN 
MARY GOODMAN 
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 
MIKE MARTUCCI 
ANTHONY LANZETTA 
HEDDY ALBERT 


ADVERTISING 

BERNIE BLAKE 

Director of Advertising 

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES 

STAN SO I PER New York 
BILL STUPER New York 
HARVEY GELLER Hollywood 
WOODY HARDING 
Art Director 


The Way To A 
Summer Saks festival 


COIN MACHINES & VENDING 

ED ADLUM 

General Manager 


BEN JONES Asst. 
CAMILLE COMPASIO Chicogo 
LISSA MORROW Hollywood 


CIRCULATION 
THERESA 10RT0SA Mgr. 


CHICAGO 

HOLLYWOOD 

CAMILLE COMPASIO 

29 E. Madison St. 
Chicago 2. III. 

(Phone: (3r2) FI 6-7272) 

HARVEY GELLER 
6290 Sunset Blvd. 
Hollywood, Calif. 90028 
(Phone: (213) 465-2129) 


EUROPEAN DIRECTOR 
NEVILLE MARTEN 


ENGLAND 

NEVILLE MARTEN 
Dorris Land 

9a New Bond St. 
London, Wl, England 
Tel: 01-493-2868 


ITALY 

MARIO PANVINI ROSATI 
Galleria Passarella 2 
Milan (Italy) 

Tel: 790990 


GERMANY 

MAL SONDOCK 
Josef Raps Strasse 1 
Munich, Germany 
Tel: 326410 


HOLLAND 

PAUL ACKET 
Thereslastraat 59-63 
The Hague 
Tel: 837703 

FRANCE 

CHRISTOPHE IZARD 
24, Rue Octave Feuillet, 
Paris XVI Tel: 870-9358 


SCANDINAVIA 

SVEN G. WINQUIST 
Kaggeholmsvagen 48, 
Stockholm-Enskede, 
Sweden, Tel: 59-46 85 
122 40 


AUSTRALIA 

RON TUDOR 
8 Francis St., 
Heathmont, Victoria 
Tel: 870-5677 


CANADA 

LORI BRUNER 
1560 Bayview Ave. 
Suite 107 

Toronto 17, Canada 
ARGENTINA 
MIGUEL SMIRNOFF 
Rafaela 3978, 
Buenos Aires, 

Tel: 69-1538 

BRAZIL 

LUIS de M.C. GUEDES 
Ruo Rego Freitas, 
289 — 3“, andar 
Sao Paulo, SP 

MEXICO 

ENRIQUE ORTIZ 
Insurgentes Sur 1870 
Mexico 20, D. F., 
Tel: 24-65-57 

JAPAN 

Adv. Mgr.: 
SHOICHI KUSANO 

Editorial Mgr.: 
MORIHIRO NAGATA 
466 Higfashi-OIzumi 
Neirimaku, 
Tokyo 

BELGIUM 

JOS BAUDEWIJN 
Lindestraat 19 
Lokeren 

Tel: 09 78 31 76 


SPAIN 

JOSE MARIA INIGO 
Avdo. de Jose Antonio 32, 
Madrid 13, 

Spain. 

Tel: 222 1181 


SUBSCRIPTION RATES $25 per year anywhere in the U.S.A. 
Published weekly. Second ciass postage piaid at New York, 
N. Y. 10001 U.S.A. 

Copyright © 1968 by The Cash Box Publishing Co., Inc. 
All right reserved. Copyright under Universal Copyrignt Con- 
vention. 


The United States is a music festival 
this summer. Virtually no form of musi- 
cal expression mW be left untouched as 
tennis stadiums, concert areas, parks 
and so forth play host to either single 
musical events or a series of vvarm- 
vYeather, sun or moonlit presentations. 

It will be difficult to find an act which 
participates in jazz, folk, rock or classi- 
cal offerings that does not have an 
affiliation with a disk company. At this 
time of dramatic, “live” appearances by 
many of the leading disk-oriented at- 
tractions, we hope that labels are think- 
ing not only about these acts “sell- 
themselves-onstage,” but also about 
the helping-hand that can be employed 
to boost post-concert record sales. 

What this essentially requires is a 
localized promotional outlook. Artists’ 
itineraries must be closely followed so 
that some advance work — even if it’s 
just a few days before their arrivals — 
can be done. For one thing, major retail 
outlets should be checked to determine 
if they have sufficient (if any) stock on 
hand that features the performers in 
question. It should also be determined 
if the place where the performance is 
being held will allow the placement of 
posters or the distribution of handbills. 
Radio stations should be called on the 


possibility that an artist could make an 
interesting interviewee on a musical or 
“talk” show. And, of course, the familiar 
round of promo contacts with local 
newspapers could lead to readable 
human-interest copy, either in lieu of 
or in support of ad placements. 

A lot of this undertaking, naturally, 
falls into the hands of the local distrib- 
utor. But, it is essential that the local 
distribs feel that the labels involved 
are vitally interested in making a strong 
promotional go of an artist’s in-person 
date. The incentive for going-all-out to 
promote a personal-appearance largely 
rests on: 1) the effectiveness of the ar- 
tist; 2) the willingness of his label to 
reach into each locality and make the 
most of each and every appearance he 
makes; 3) and, of course, complete ar- 
tist cooperation. 

The music industry is, fortunately, in 
an age when disk acts are by and large 
immensely dramatic and fulfilling on- 
stage. This stage presence should act 
as a great stimulant to interest in their 
disk work. The summer music festivals 
on hand are an opportunity to transfer 
talent-on-stage to even greater success 
on records. This is all up to record com- 
panies — and everyone who wishes an 
act a healthier, wealthier career. 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


3 





3 

4 

5 

6 


10 

11 


17 


18 

19 


23 


[ I I I 1 f 


' m u' wy/r 




CttshBoxTOPlOO 


MRS. ROBINSON 

Simon & Garfunkel-Columbia 44511 

THIS GUY'S IN LOVE 
WITH YOU 

Herb Alpert-A&M 929 

MAC ARTHUR PARK 

Richard Harris-Dunhill 4134 

MONY MONY 

Tommy James & The Shondells-Roulette 7008 

YUMMY YUMMY YUMMY 

Ohio Express-Buddah 38 

TIGHTEN UP 

Archie Bell-Atlantic 3478 


00 

1 1 


12 


THINK 


Aretha Franklin-Atlanfic 2518 10 15 


ANGEL OF THE MORNING 

Merrilee Rush-Bell 705 


12 31 


THE GOOD, THE BAD, 

AND THE UGLY 

Hugo Montenegro-RCA 9423 

BEAUTIFUL MORNING 

The Rascals-Atlantic 2493 

MASTER JACK 

Four Jacks & A Jill-RCA 9473 

I COULD NEVER LOVE 
ANOTHER 

Temptations-Gordy 7072 

REACH OUT OF THE 
DARKNESS 

Friend & Lover-Verve/Forecast 5069 


7 3 

11 10 


15 16 


24 39 


14 LIKE TO GET TO KNOW YOU 


Sparky & Our Gang-Mercury 72795 

THE HORSE 

Cliff Nobles & Co.-Phil L.A. of Soul 313 

THE LOOK OF LOVE 

Sergio Mendes Brasil '66-A&M 924 

AIN'T NOTHING LIKE 
THE REAL THING 

Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell-Tamla 54163 

A MAN WITHOUT LOVE 

Engelbert Humperdinck-Parrot 40027 

I LOVE YOU 

People-Capitol 2078 

CHOO CHOO TRAIN 

Box Tops-Mala 12005 

LICKING STICK-LICKING 
STICK (Part 1) 

James Brown-King 6166 

HOW'D WE EVER GET 
THIS WAY 

Andy Kim-Steed 707 


13 14 


37 69 


38 61 


9 11 

20 28 

22 30 


31 49 


30 48 


27 36 



Association-Warner Bros. 7195 

26 

34 

58 


TIP TOE THRU THE TULIPS 



59 


Tiny Tim-Warner Bros. 0679 

34 

56 

25 

UNITED 





Peaches & Herb-Date 1603 

28 

47 

• 

26 

DELILAH 




Tom Jones-Parrot 40025 

21 

20 

61 

9 

NEVER GIVE YOU UP 


62 


Jerry Butler-Mercury 72798 

45 

51 

9 

JUMPIN' JACK FLASH 




Rolling Stones- London 908 

58 





INDIAN LAKE 



64 

w 

Cowsills-MGM 13944 

40 

64 

JU 

JELLY JUNGLE 



65 

31 

Lemon Pipers-Buddah 41 

36 

45 

LOVE IS ALL AROUND 



66 

32 

Troggs-Smash 1607 

25 

26 

HONEY 



67 


Bobby Goldsboro- United Artists 50283 

14 

13 

• 

SHE'S A HEART BREAKER 




Gene Pitney-Musicor 1306 

42 

62 



34 

35 

36 


f 


41 


43 

44 

45 


48 


53 

54 


COWBOYS TO GIRLS 

Intruders-Gamble 214 16 

MY GIRL/HEY GIRL MEDLEY 

Bobby Vee-Liberty 56033 17 

SHOO-BE-DOO-BE DOO-DA-DAY 


Stevie Wonder-Tamla 54165 

LADY WILL POWER 

Gary Puckett & Unian Gap-Columbia 44547 

I WANNA LIVE 

Glen Campbell-Capitol 2146 

SOME THINGS YOU NEVER 
GET USED TO 

Diana Ross & The Supremes-Motown 1126 

STONED SOUL PICNIC 

5fh Dimension-Soul City 766 

DO YOU KNOW THE WAY 
TO SAN JOSE 

Diorne Warwick-Scepter 12216 

TESTER LOVE 

Smokey Robinson & Miracles-Tamla 54167 

IF YOU DON'T WANT MY 
LOVE 

Robert John-Columbia 44435 

YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT 
YOU MEAN TO ME 

Sam & Dave-Atlantic 2517 


I'LL NEVER DO YOU WRONG 


f 


IF 

SAFE 


IN 


Joe Tex-Diai 4076 

HERE COMES THE JUDGE 

Shorty Long-Sout 35044 

D. W. WASHBURN 

The Monkees-Colgems 1023 

I WERE A CARPENTER 

4 Tops-Motown 1124 

MY GARDEN 

Mamas & Papas-Dunhill 5125 

I WILL ALWAYS THINK 
ABOUT YOU 

New Colony Six-Mercury 72775 

(YOU KEEP ME) HANGIN' ON 

Joe Simon-Sound Stage 7/2608 

SKY PILOT (Part 1) 

Eric Burdon & Animals-MGM 13939 

UNICORN 

The Irish Rovers-Decca 32254 

SHE'S LOOKING GOOD 

Wilson Pickett-Atlantic 2504 

HERE I AM BABY 

Marvellettes-Tamla 54166 

BRING A LITTLE LOVIN 

Los Bravos- Parrot 3020 

IT SHOULD HAVE BEEN ME 

Gladys Knight & The Pips-Soul 35045 

TAKE TIME TO KNOW HER 

Percy Sledge-Atlantic 2490 

BACK IN LOVE AGAIN 

Buckinghams-Columbia 44533 

GRAZING IN THE GRASS 

Hugh Masekela-UNI 55066 

SOUL SERENADE 

Willie Mitchell-Hi 2140 

SLEEPY JOE 

Herman's Hermits-MGM 13934 

HERE COMES THE JUDGE 

The Magistrates-MGM 13946 

UNWIND 

Ray Stevens-Monument 1048 

LOVE IN EVERY ROOM 

Paul Mauriat-Philips 40530 

APOLOGIZE 

Ed Ames-RCA 9517 

DOES YOUR MAMA 
KNOW ABOUT ME 

Bobby Taylor & The Vancouvers-Gordy 7069 


17 


18 


61 — 


39 41 


57 — 


56 70 


33 19 


53 66 


46 37 


50 59 


48 52 


72 89 


68 

70 


51 53 


81 85 


72 

73 


52 57 


78 88 


76 

78 


81 

82 


BROOKLYN ROADS 

Neil Diamond-UNI 55065 

PEOPLE SURE ACT FUNNY 

Arthur Conley-Atco 6588 

PICTURES OF MATCH 
STICK MEN 

The Status Quo-Cadet Concept 7001 

THE STORY OF ROCK & ROLL 

Turtles-White Whale 237 — 

I GOT YOU BABE 

Etta James-Cadet 5606 

MOUNTAIN OF LOVE 

Ronnie Dove-Diamond 244 

BABY YOU COME ROLLIN' 
ACROSS MY MIND 

Peppermint Trolley Co. -Acta 815 

LET YOURSELF GO 

Elvis Presley-RCA 9547 

IT'S OVER 

Eddy Arnold-RCA 9525 

ELEANOR RIGBY 

Ray Charles-ABC 11090 

FOLSOM PRISON BLUES 

Johnny Cash-Columbia 44513 

IT'S NICE TO BE WITH YOU 

The Monkees'Colgems 1023 

HURDY GURDY MAN 

Donovan-Epic 10345 

COMPETITION AIN'T NOTHING 


88 — 


71 72 


85 — 


Little Carl Carlton-Back Beat 588 

LOVER'S HOLIDAY 

Peggy Scott & Jo Jo Bensen-SSS Int'l 736 

YOUR TIME HASN'T COME 


87 — 


89 93 


29 

22 


YET, BABY 






Elvis Presley-RCA 9547 

— 

— 

59 

71 

84 

FACE IT GIRL, IT'S OVER 






Nancy Wilson-Capitol 2136 

84 

90 



85 

HERE COMES THE JUDGE 



32 

33 


Buena Vistas-Marquee 443 

92 

97 

N 


86 

EYES OF A NEW YORK 



60 

65 


WOMAN 






B.J. Thomas-Scepter 12219 

91 

— 

69 

80 

• 

HERE COMES THE JUDGE 






Pigmeat Markham-Chess 2049 

— 

— 

19 

18 

0 

LOVIN' SEASON 






Gene & Debbie-TRX 5010 

— 

— 

23 

25 

m 

(THE PUPPET SONG) 





w 

WHISKEY ON A SUNDAY 



64 

74 


Irish Rovers-Decca 32333 

— 

— 



90 

AIN'T NOTHIN' BUT A 



65 

78 


HOUSE PARTY 






Show Stoppers-Heritage 800 

94 

— 

66 

77 

91 

AMERICA IS MY HOME 






PART 1 



41 

21 


James Brown-K!ng 12413 

— 

— 



92 

SWEET MEMORIES 



63 

73 


Andy Williams-Columbia 44527 

— 

— 



93 

YES SIR, THAT'S MY BABY 


i 

74 

— 


Baja Marimba Band-A&M 937 

— 

— 



94 

LET ME BE LONELY 



43 

32 


Dionne Warwick-Scepter 12216 

93 

— 


An 

95 

YOU'RE GOOD FOR ME 



04 

ou 


Lou Rawls-Capitol 2172 

— 

— 

76 

86 

96 

WITH PEN IN HAND 






Billy Vera-Atlantic 2526 

— 

— 

44 

46 

97 

2 + 2 = ? 






Bob Seger-Capitol 2143 

100 

— 

55 

58 

98 

RANDY 






Happenings-B.T. Puppy 540 

90 

98 

70 

67 

99 

SEALED WITH A KISS 






Gary Lewis-Liberty 56037 

— 

— 



100 

YOU GOT STYLE 



49 

44 


Jon & Robin-Abnak 130 

— 

— 


A Beautiful Morning (Slacsar, BMI) 
Ain’t Nothin But a House Party (D 


^ALPHABETIZED TOP 100 (INCLUDING PUBLISHERS AND LICENSEES); 


Party (Dandelion, 


10 


Angel of the Morning (Blackwood, BMI). . 
Ain’t Nothing Like The Real Thing 

(Jobete, BMI) 

A Man Without Love (Leeds, ASCAP) ! 

America Is My Home Part I 

(Dynatone, BMI) 

Apologize (Stone Canyon, BMI) " 

Baby You Come Rollin’ Across My Mind 

(Bresnahan, BMI) 

Back In Love Again (Bucking-El, BMI)! ' 
Bring A Little Lovin’ (Miller. ASCAP)... 

Brooklyn Roads (Stonebridge, BMI) 

Choo Choo Train (Ruler, Mulu, BMI) 

Cowboys To Girls (Razor Sharp, BMI). . 

Comoetit’cn Ain’t Nothing (Don, BMI) 

Delilah (Donna, BMI) 

Does Your Momma Know About Me 

.'Stein, Van Stock, ASCAP) 

m You Know The Way To San Jose 

(Jac, Blue Seas, ASCAP) 

•X W, Washburn (Screen Gems/Columbia, BMI) 

Eleamor Rigby (MacLen, BMI) 

Eyes of a New York Woman (Press, BMI) 

Face It Girl, It’s Over (Richard Lewis, ASCAP) 

Folsom Prison Blues (Hi-Lo, BMI) 

Good, The Bad & The Ugly (Unart, BMI) 

Grazing in the Grass (Chisa, BMI) 


90 

8 


17 

18 


91 

66 


74 

59 

56 

68 

20 

34 

81 

26 


67 


41 

47 

77 
86 
84 

78 
9 

60 


Here Comes The Judge (Hastings, Sreeby, BMI) 63 

Here Comes The Judge (Jobette, BMI) 46 

Here Comes The Judge (Arc, B’Ml) 87 

Here Comes The Judge (Tincal, Chetkay, BMI). 85 

Here I Am Baby (Jobete, BMI) 55 

Honey (Russell Cason, ASCAP) 32 

Horse, The (Dandelion, James Boy, BMI) 15 

How’d We Ever Get This Way (Unart, BMI).. 

Hurdy Gurdy Man (Peer Int’l., BMI) 

I Could Never Love Another (Jobete, B'MI).. 

If I Were A Carpenter (Faithful Virtue, BMI). 

If You Don’t Want My Love (Bornwin, BMI).. 

I Got You Babe (Cotillion, Chrismarc, BMI).. 

I’ll Never Do Wrong (Tree, BMI) 

Love You (Mainstay, BMI) 


Indian Lake (Pocket Full of Tunes, BMI) 29 


BMI). 


57 


79 


It Should Have Been Me (Jobete, 

It’s Nice To Be With You 
(Scren Gems/Columbia, BMI) 

It’s Over (Honey Comb, ASCAP) 76 

I Wanna Live (Wind Ward Side, BMI) 38 

I Will Always Think About You 

(New Colony, T.M., BMI) 

Jelly Jungle (Kama Sutra, BMI) 

Jumpin' Jack Flash (Gideon, B'MI) 

Lady Will Power (Vivi, BMI) 

Let Me Be Lonely (Jac, Blue Seas, ASCAP)... 

Let Yourself Go (Elvis Presley, BMI) 

Licking Stick-Licking Stick (Toccoa, Lois, BMI) 


Like To Get To Know You (Takya, ASCAP) 14 

Look Of Love (Colgems, ASCAP) 16 

Love In Every Room (Northern, ASCAP) 65 

Lovin’ Season (Acuff Rose, BMI) 88 

Love Is All Around (Dick James, BMI) 31 

Lovers Holiday (Crazy Cajun, B'MI) 82 

MacArthur Park (Canopy, ASCAP) 


Master Jack 
Mony Mony 
Mountain of 


(Milene, ASCAP) 11 


(Patricia, BMI 


Love (Wrer), BMI) , 73 


BMI).' 


Mrs. Robinson (Charing Cross, 

My Girl/Hey Girl 

(Jobete, Screen Gems, Columbia, BMI) 35 

Never Give You Up (Parabut, BMI) 27 

People Sure Act Funny (Bob-Dan, BMI) 69 

Pictures of Match Stick Men (Northern, B'MI) 70 

Randy (Bright Tunes, BMI) 98 

Reach Out Of The Darkness (Lowery, BMI)... 13 

Safe In My Garden 

(Wingate, Honest John, ASCAP) 49 

Sealed With A Kiss (Post, ASCAP) 99 

She’s A Heartbreaker (Catalogue, BMI) 33 

She’s Looking Good (Veytig, BMI) 54 

Shoo-Be-Doo-Be-Doo-Da-Day (Jobete, B'MI) 36 

Sky Pilot (Slamina, Sealark, BMI) 52 

Sleepy Joe (Hermits, BMI) 

Some Things You Never Get Used To 

(Jobete, BMI) 

Soul Serenade (Kilynn, BMI) 

Stoned Soul Picnic (Tuna Fish, BMI). 


62 


Story of Rock & Roll, The 

(Rock Music, BMI) 71 

Sweet Memories (Acuff Rose, B'MI) 92 

Take Time To Know Her (Al Galico, BMI) 58 

Think (Fourteenth Hour, BMI).... 7 

This Guy In Love With You 

(Blue Seas, Jac. ASCAP) 2 

Tighten Up (Cotillion, BMI) 6 

Time For Livin’ (Tamberline, BMI) 23 

Tip Toe Thru The Tulips (Warner Bros./ 

Seven Arts, Witmark, ASCAP) 24 

2 4 . 2 — ? (Gear, ASCAP) 97 

Unicorn (Hollis, BMI) 53 

United (Razor Sharp, B'MI) 25 

Unwind (Ahab, BMI) 64 

Whiskey On A Sunday (The Puppet Song) 

(Essex, ASCAP) 89 

With Pen In Hand (Unart, BMI) 96 

Yes Sir, That’s My Baby (Bourne, ASCAP) 93 

Tester Love (Jobete, BMI) 42 

You Don’t Know What You Mean To Me 

(East, Cotillion, BMI) 44 

You Got Style (Unart, BMI) 100 

You Keep Me (Hanging On) 

(Garpax, Arlanbo, B'MI) 

Your Time Hasn’t Come Yet, Baby 

(Elvis Presley, BMI) 83 

You’re Good For Me (Metric, BMI) 95 

Yummy, Yummy, Yummy (T.M., BMI) 5 


51 


COMPILED FROM LEADING RETAIL OUTLETS— DOES NOT INCLUDE AIRPLAY REPORTS 


• SHARP UPWARD MOVE 



ash Box — June 15, 1968 


5 





#STEREDQRCJIVieT9R 


Master Jack 
grows up. 


Two months ago we told you FOUR JACKS AND A JILL would hit with their Victor single 


6 


Cash Box — Jure 15, 1968 




' 

\,5how Business Mourns Denth Of Senutor Kennedy 


, NEW YORK — Show business faced its 
^ second blackout in two months as the 
nation paid tribute to Senator Robert 
I ** F. Kennedy, slain in Los Angeles last 
‘ week by an assassin’s bullets. The 
^ murder of Dr. Martin Luther King, 
Jr. in Memphis last April produced a 
similar response. 

From the moment the announcement 
; that the tragedy had taken place, 
radio and TV stations directed their 
attentions to coverage of the event, 
thus eliminating a good deal of regu- 
lar programming schedules, including 
'' ► musical shows. As the Senator lay 

B unconscious in Good Samaritan Hospi- 
” tal, there was some return to normal 
programming — even if some Top 40 
outlets greatly softened their sounds. 
J Word of the Senator’s death Thurs- 
^ day morning was expected to cancel- 
out any number of show business- 
associated events in addition to ex- 
'■ pected broadcast tributes. Since Sun- 
day had been proclaimed a national 
'* day of mourning by President John- 
son, the Ed Sullivan TV show said 
that it would cancel all comedy and 
pop music acts. The show had origin- 
^ ally scheduled the debut of the new 
Buddah Records act, the “Kasenetz- 
, Katz Singing Orchestral Circus.” 
* Their appearance will be rescheduled. 

Label Receptions Called Ofif 

The record business’ quickest re- 
sponse — both to the shooting and 
eventual death of Senator Kennedy — 
y was to cancel a spate of press recep- 
tions. MGM in New York called off two 
events, one for Kim Weston on Wed- 


nesday evening and another for a new 
male artist the following day. United 
Artists Records also noted the tragedy 
by cancelling a bash for Gordon Light- 
foot. 

A number of labels in New York 
had plans to close their offices on Fri- 
day, designated an official day of 
mourning for the city by Mayor John 
Lindsay. 

While the release of Senator Ken- 
nedy memorial albums and singles 
could be expected there were no re- 
ports at presstime from any labels as 
to their plans. The death of Dr. King 
was followed by various recorded trib- 
utes, with all or a portion of the royal- 
ties earmarked for Dr. King’s South- 
ern Christian Leadership Conference. 

Senator Kennedy’s fame and dis- 
tinctive Bostonian manner of speech, 
had been the source of comedy record- 
ings, the most successful of which was 
“Wild Thing” by Senator Bobby on the 
Cameo label. This recording, like 
others that followed, employed a 
mimic. The “First Family” album, re- 
leased a year before the death of 
President Kennedy, was a laT-set 
credited with sales of more than 5 
million copies. 

Artists Supported Him 

Senator Kennedy’s drive to achieve 
the nomination of the Democratic 
Party for President was supported by 
a number of show business figures, in- 
cluding many from the world of rec- 
ords. According to the May 31, issue 
of Time Magazine his supporters in- 
cluded Bill Cosby, Bobby Darin, Sam- 


my Davis, Peter Duchin, Patty Duke, 
Eddie Fisher, Aretha Franklin, Lesley 
Gore, Mahalia Jackson, Jefferson Air- 
plane, Alan Jay Lerner, Trini Lopez, 
Rod McKuen, Henry Mancini, Andre 
Previn, Diana Ross & the Supremes, 
Rowan & Martin, Sonny & Cher, Bar- 
bra Streisand and Andy Williams. 

JFK Recalled 

The latest trap-edy to befell the Ken- 
nedy family elicited recollections about 
the murder of President John F. Ken- 
nedy on Nov. 22, 1963. Roger Williams, 
the Kapp pianist who visited the offices 
of Cash Box last week, recalled that 
he was told that the last music Presi- 
dent Kennedy heard was selections 
from his LP, “Yellow Bird.” This took 
place in the President’s hotel room in 
Ft. Worth. Texas as he was shaving. 
The President, of course, would em- 
bark on his fateful trip to Dallas a few 
hours later. A check of the hotel room 
after Kennedy was shot showed that 
the phonograph needle was still posi- 
tioned on the grooves of the LP. Wil- 
liams said he decided then to donate 
all royalties from the sale of the LP 
to the Kennedy Memorial Library in 
Cambridge, Mass. He also indicated 
that the album and phono might be 
placed on exhibit in the library. 

It is yet to be determined what were 
the last sounds of music heard by 
Senator Kennedy before he stepped 
through the hallway of a kitchen in 
the Ambassador Hotel — following a 
California primary victory message — 
and fell at the hand of an assassin. 


-• y> 


i FRONT COVFR; 



I The Buddah label is hot, with acts 
' like the Ohio Express, the Lemon 
Pipers and 1910 Fruitgum Co. riding 
with chart material. The Ohio Express 
have a top 10 stand with “Yummy 
Yummy Yummy,” while the Lemon 
Pipers and 1910 Fruit Gum Co. are 
^ Top 100 factors with “Jelly Jungle” 
and “May I Take a Giant Step,” re- 
spectively. The company is also look- 
ing ahead with new and proven attrac- 
» tions. New is the “Kasenetz-Katz Sing- 
ing Orchestral Circuit,” 36-member 
group that includes individuals from 
other teams, including the Ohio Ex- 
press and the 1910 Fruitgum Co. From 
’ the field of perennial favorites, the la- 
bel has just made an agreement to re- 
lease product by the Impressions thru 
their new Curtom label (see separate 
story). 


f 

<(< INDEX 

Album Reviews 56, 58 

Basic Album Inventory 54 

Bios for D.J.’s 26 

Coin Machine Section 70-78 

Country Music Section 59-62 

International Section 63-69 

*■ Looking Ahead (Singles) 10 

R&B Top 50 42 

Radio Active 16 

Record Ramblings 44, 48 

* Singles Reviews 13, 14 

Sure Shots 18 

Talent on Stage 50 

y Top 100 Albums 53 

Vital Statistics 32, 34 


Disk Museum Spins 

LAWTON OKLAHOMA — An ex-pro- 
fessional musician has established a 
“Record Museum” at which he is the 
curator for the 78rpm era. 

A longtime collector of 78’s, Whit 
Ozier started the museum two years 
ago on a non-profit basis. Since then, 
he has had donated to the museum 
22,000 records and players of all kinds 
that date from 1895 to the present. 

Public Use Planned 

“We are hoping to be able to fur- 
nish almost any original selection to 
the public someday and tape duplicate 
for deejays or special radio and TV 
shows, perhaps even furnish out of 
our original duplicates records to fill 
out collections being accumulated by 
other collectors,” Ozier explains. 

Ozier, who has built a building to 
house his collection, says he uses dup- 
licates to trade for copies of records 
he doesn’t have, or use the money 
earned from selling duplicates to add 
shelving, green stock envelopes and, 
hopefully, a good system for reproduc- 
tion. At present, the museum has no 
way of playing big Standard Library 
Transcriptions and is seeking a 16 
inch turntable like those used at radio 
stations. 

Ops, Dealers Help 

Many of his records came from 
juke box operators and dealers, some 
from radio stations clearing out oldies 
and others from private individual 


NEW YORK — Columbia Records has 
what may well be a record-breaking 
total of 22 LP’s riding on Cash Box’s 
chart of best-selling albums. The Cash 
Box chart contains a listing of both 
the Top 100 albums and 40 additional 
albums just under the Top 100. Colum- 
bia’s showing does not include product 
from the Epic label, a part of the 
CBS label family, but not distributed 
by Columbia Records. 

Clive Davis, president of CBS Rec- 
ords, commented on the impressive 
showing by stating, “I am very grati- 
fied to learn of the Cash Box chart 
record just set by Columbia. Although 
the degree of penetration by Columbia 
on Cash Box’s chart is unique, the 
most significant fact is the diversifi- 
cation of product represented in the 
listing. Columbia’s contemporary and 
underground rock groups are repre- 


Tuie Of 78 s Era 

collections. In addition to recorded ma- 
terial, Ozier says he will accept sheet 
music, record catalogs, advertising, 
plaster trademarks such as the Pathe 
Rooster or Victor dog, photos, etc. An 
index file is now in preparation accord- 
ing to label name. 

Ozier is also seeking a 78rpm juke 
box, a floor model that plays 20 or 24 
selections. 


Ozier’s address is 701 Arlington, 
Lawton, Oklahoma 73501. 



Whit Ozier 


sented in strength throughout the 
chart, along with the label’s leading- 
artists in the populai'-music field.” 

S&G Other Gold Acts 

Simon and Garfunkel, Columbia’s 
sensational folk-rock team, is repre- 
sented by all five of the LP’s they 
ever z-ecorded, including the four Gold 
Record winners “Bookends,” in the 
No. 1 position; “The Graduate,” chart- 
ed as No. 3; “Parsley, Sage, Rosemary 
and Thyme,” in the No. 6 slot; and 
“Sounds of Silence,” listed as No. 25. 
Simon and Garfunkel’s first album 
for Columbia, entitled “Wednesday 
Morning, 3 a.m.” is making its second 
appearance as a nation-wide best 
seller three years after its initial 
release. 

(Continued on page 46) 


Diversified LP Chart Splurge For Col. 


ROBERT F. KENNEDY 
1925-1968 

The aftermath of a new trag- 
edy — the assassination of Sena- 
tor Robert F. Kennedy — has had 
a pattern tragically familiar to 
the world. The disbelief upon 
hearing that the assassin’s hand 
had struck, the agonizing period 
of waiting in a life-or-death sit- 
uation, the words of consolation, 
the appraisal of the tragedy’s 
meaning, the expressions of hope 
that a “lesson” could be learned 
in an attempt to reinforce the 
philosophy of some that “good 
can come out of evil.” 

But, after all is said and done, 
a young and brilliant public fig- 
ure is gone. In an age when the 
youth of the world often find 
little comfort in the words or 
deeds of their elders. Senator 
Kennedy — like his martyred 
brother. President John F. Ken- 
nedy, before him — was among 
the small coterie of “elders” 
who could relate to youth. In 
an age when poverty and social 
inequality continue to be the 
shame of supposedly enlightened 
and prosperous societies. Sena- 
tor Kennedy had special mean- 
ing not only to the concerned, but 
more importantly to the victims 
of economic and social injustice. 

The Kennedy brothers. Dr. 
Martin Luther King, himself 
felled by an assassin two months 
ago, were leaders that our nation 
and the world desperately need- 
ed. Now they are gone, and it’s 
up to other men of goodwill to 
continue the struggle against the 
evils that their ill-fated counter- 
parts died for. 


ASCAP Creates An 
Associate Membership 

NEW YORK — ASCAP’s membership 
voted last week to pass the proposed 
amendment to the society’s articles of 
association, to create associate mem- 
berships. The writer-members of 
ASCAP voted 84.14% in favor of pas- 
sage of this amendment, while the 
publishers voted 91.96% in favor. 

The amendment, proposed by Dr. 
John Vincent, had been unanimously 
recommended by the writers advisory 
committee, and was unanimously ap- 
proved by the Society’s Board of 
Directors. 

The purpose of the amendment is to 
create a new class of associate writer- 
members, to enable writers who have 
not yet had a work published or rec- 
orded to be elected to associate mem- 
bership in ASCAP. The -wi-iters affec- 
ted would include those now experi- 
menting in new fields, such as elec- 
tronic, computer and “think” music, 
and any other writers whose composi- 
tions have not yet been regularly 
published or recorded. 

These associate members will not 
pay any dues. They will be advanced 
to participating membership as soon 
as any of their works are performed 
by the society’s licensees, or regularly 
published or commercially recorded. 

ASCAP president Stanley Adams, 
in commenting on the amendment, 
said: “The passage of this amendment 
to elect Associate Members is an im- 
portant step for the Society. It opens 
the way to membership in ASCAP 
for those young people whose creative 
talents are not yet recognized by com- 
mercial interests.” 

The committee on elections includes 
Carolyn Leigh, Fred E. Ahlert, Jr., 
Harold Arlen, Franco Colombo, Milton 
Kramer, Gerald Marks, Johnny Mer- 
cer, Vincent Persichetti, with Mitchell 
Parish, chairman. 


Phil Rose Elected 
WB-Seven Arts VP 
Venice Jazz Fest 
See Int'l News Report 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


7 




Masekela is musk. 


and Masekekft got a smash! 

'Y^AZMGMTHE GRASS” 

from his giant new album! 




The Romiseof a Fuhjie 


UNI 73028 


PRODUCED BY 


CHISA PRODUCTIONS 


"UNIVERSAL CITY RECORDS 
A DIVISION OF MCA INC. 


HLX3H 


UNI 73007 


UNI 73015 


UNI 73010 


CONSULT YOUR DISTRIBUTOR FOR MASEKELA MERCHANDISING AIDS! 


8 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 




Here Comes Pigmeat Markham Rs 
^Skii Pays OH For Vet Comedian 




NEW YORK — His 40-year-old routine 
has opened up a new career for come- 
^^dian Pigmeat Markham. 

In 1927, the 64-year-old Negro com- 
ic originated the Trial — Here Come 
the Judge, a staple in his repertoire. 
The skit, of course, has reached na- 
tional prominence, thanks to its use 
on the Rowan & Martin Laugh-In on 
"i TV and on disks. 

Now, Markham himself is employ- 
» ing the routine to expand his own ca- 
reer. Firstly, Chess Records has a 
Here Come the Judge single by the 
performer, which is also included in an 
,f,LP with the same title. One side of the 
single is a narrative version of the 


original skit, while the flip is a sing- 
ing variation. Latter moves onto the 
charts in the number 87 spot this week. 

With Chess reporting action on the 
disk, Markham is set for a 50-day 
tour with such standout acts as Joe 
Tex, Percy Sledge, the Delfonics and 
the Intruders. And to top off the icing 
on his freshly baked cake, Markham 
has been earmarked for 18-appear- 
ances on next season’s Laugh-In 
series. He will also appear on the 
Johnny Carson Tonight Show. 

This new-won fame follows more 
than 50 years of making people laugh 
with his comic artistry. 


ButUah To Handle New Impressions Label 






Capitol Releases 12 
New LP's, 13 Tapes 

HOLLYWOOD — Capitol Records has 
released 12 new albums and 13 new 
tapes. 

The LP release is as follows: “War 
And Peace,” original soundtrack; 
“Friends,” the Beach Boys; “Of 
Horses, Kids, And Forgotten Women,” 
^ the Hearts and Flowers; “Soft Hawai- 
ian Guitars,” Webley Edwards; “Lord 
Sitar;” “iStan Kenton Conducts The 
Jazz Compositions Of Dee Barton;” 
• “My Shining Hour,” Duane Dee; 

“Something Pretty,” Wynn Stewart; 
*' “An Old Love Never Dies,” Bobby 
Austin; “Children Of The Future,” 
■' the iSteve Miller Band; “Quicksilver 
>>^Messenger Service,” the Quicksilver 
Messenger Service; and “Tighten Up,” 
I Benny Gordon and the iSoul Brothers. 

Capitol is offering, in stereo cart- 
ridge and reel-to-reel form, “A New 
Place In The iSun,” Glen Campbell; 
“Easy,” Nancy Wilson; “Cannonball 
, 5 ,Adderley With Sergio Mendes And 
The Bossa Rio Sextet;” “iSpring,” the 
Lettermen; “Love Is Blue,” A1 Mar- 
tino; and “Shearing Today,” George 
Shearing. The other stereo cartridges 
are: “The Legend Of Bonnie And 
k. Clyde,” Merle Haggard; “Where No 
One Stands Alone,” Ferlin Husky; 
“World Of Pop & Country Hits,” Ten- 
nessee Ernie Ford; “The Best Of 
1 ^- Wanda Jackson;” “Dust On Mother’s 
Bible,” Buck Owens & His Buckaroos; 

I “The Last Goodbye,” Dick Miles; and 
“Super iSoul-Dees,” Vol. 2, various 
L artists. ' 


RCA Releases Presley 
'Speedway' Soundtrack 

NEW YORK — Elvis Presley’s 18th 
original soundtrack LP, from the MGM 
flick “Speedway,” will be released by 
RCA this month. Pic, due to open 
cross-country in June and July, teams 
Presley with Nancy Sinatra. 

In addition to the seven soundtrack 
songs (which include a Presley-Sinat- 
ra duet and a Sinatra solo), the LP 
will feature five new Presley songs. 
“Speedway,” a romantic comedy, was 
filmed at North Carolina’s famed 
Charlotte Speedway. 


NEW YORK — An agreement has been 
concluded between Buddah Records 
and the hit R&B group, the Impres- 
sions, whereby Buddah will distribute 
the Impressions’ new Curtom label. 

Neil Bogart Buddah’s general man- 
ager, made the announcement Satur- 
day afternoon at the Buddah conven- 
tion, held June 7-9 at the City Squire 
Motor Inn in New York. The agree- 
ment was completed between Eddie 
Thomas, president of Curtom, Inc., and 
Art Kass, executive vice president 
representing Buddah. 

In addition to the appearance of 
the Impressions on Curtom, group 
leader and songwriter Curtis Mayfield 
will also produce for the label. The 
first Curtom Impressions release is 
scheduled to be bowed at the NATRA 
Miami convention in August. 

Top sellers for the last ten years, 
the Impressions, on the ABC label 
up until now, have scored with many 
songs, all penned by Mayfield: “People 
Get Ready,” “Gypsy Woman,” “Keep 
On Pushin’,” “We’re A Winner,” “It’s 
All Right,” “I’m So Proud,” “Amen,” 
“Woman’s Got Soul” and many others. 
In addition, Mayfield has provided top 
ten hits for other artists via the writ- 
ing of such tunes as “Let It Be Me,” 
“He Will Break Your Heart,” and the 
Major Lance hits, including “Monkey 
Time.” 

Curtom, Inc., a personal manage- 


Julie Driscoll En Route Over Atlantic 


NEW YORK — One of the most widely 
acclaimed British newcomer acts to 
spring into the sales picture in recent 
months is about to have its first re- 
lease in the UjS. Julie Driscoll, Brian 
Auger & the Trinity have become 
aligned with Atlantic Records for the 
transoceanic issue of their current 
England-France top ten single “This 
Wheel’s On Fire.” 

At about the same time that the 
single will be released here. Vogue 
Magazine is to carry a story about 
“Jools” Driscoll who was formerly 
working in the fashion modeling field. 
The spread will include photos by 
Richard Avedon, who is noted for the 
Beatles posters made from pictures 
taken for another magazine story. 

Miss Driscoll has already received 
wide press coverage in Europe where 
she appeared in a number of pop festi- 
vals including appearances in Czecho- 
slovakia, Brussels, Rome, Paris and 
Montreaux. She has been offered an 
appearance date bid already by Bill 
Graham of the Fillmore Auditorium 
and other spots in America. 



HE AMES TO STAY — Norman Racusin, division vice president and general 
manager of RCA Records, points to the dotted line whereon Ed Ames has just 
affixed his signature renewing his long-term stay at the label. Watching, on the 
left, is pop A&R producer Jim Fogelsong. Ames, currently on the sales scene 
with his “Apologize” single and “Who Will Answer” LP, is one of the com- 
pany’s mainstays. Last year he came up with “My Cup Runneth Over,” “Time, 
Time,” “When the Snow Is On The Roses” and “Who Will Answer” to keep him 
on the singles lists, and earned a gold record from RIAA. In addition to his 
recording career, Ames has appeared in the musical theater, played dramatic 
roles and done regular television work in a weekly role with the “Daniel Boone” 
series. He recently completed a week-long engagement at the Westbury Music 
Fair on Long Island and has an itinerary that will cover Salt Lake City, 
Harrah’s Club in Reno, the Hollywood Bowl in L.A. and the Riviera Hotel in 
Las Vegas through August. 


The song that has projected Julie 
Driscoll, Brian Auger & the Trinity to 
success is a Bob Dylan composition. 

“Jools,” as she is called in France, 
became interested in singing eight 
years ago, cut her first record five 
years back, and later met and teamed 
with Auger and his group. 

Freeman Is ABC Producer 

NEW YORK — ABC Records president 
Larry Newton has signed Ernie Free- 
man as an exclusive staff producer for 
the label. First project will be a C&W 
LP with TV personality and comedian 
Joey Bishop. 

Freeman, who has been involved, in 
various capacities, with numerous 
million-selling singles and LP’s has 
most recently been extremely active in 
the musical scoring for television and 
movies including the Robert Wagner 
“It Takes A Thief” TV’er and the yet- 
to-be-released James Coburn flick, 
“Duffy.” 

Freeman arrangements have graced 
such hits as Vicki Carr’s “It Must Be 
Him,” Sinatra’s “That’s Life” and 
Dean Martin’s “Everybody Loves 
Somebody.” Freeman won a Grammy 
for his vocal arrangement on Sinatra’s 
“Strangers In The Night,” which he 
also produced. He’s also active in the 
production of commercials. 

A native of Cleveland, Freeman 
studied four years at the Cleveland In- 
stitute of Music and obtained his mas- 
ters degree at the University of South- 
ern California. He plays virtually 
every orchestral instrument but pre- 
fers the piano, organ, violin and saxo- 
phone. 



ment office and home of three May- 
field publishing cootnpanies (Camad 
Music, Chi-Sound Music and Curtom 
Publishing Co.) was formed at the 
beginning of the Impressions’ career. 
With Eddie Thomas as president, 
Curtis Mayfield as vice president and 
Jo Ann Rhodes as secretary, Curtom 
will continue to maintain its home 
office in Chicago and will operate out 
of the Buddah Records offices in New 
York. 

Cecil Holmes, director of R&B activ- 
ity for Buddah, has been named direc- 
tor of sales and promotion for Curtom 
Records. 



Shown at the Buddah-Curtom signing 
are (I to r) Richard Shelton, attorney ; 
Neil Bogart, Buddah general mana- 
ger; Eddie Thomas, Curtom president; 
Curtis Mayfield, leader of The Impres- 
sions; Art Kass, executive vp of Kamu 
Sutra! Buddah, and Cecil Holmes, 
Buddah director of R & B activity and 
sales-promo director for Curtom. 

Farrell Exits Trousdale 
GM Post Goes To Clark 

HOLLYWOOD — Ernie Farrell has left 
his post as general manager of Trous- 
dale Music. Farrell, who was named 
to the post just five weeks ago, is be- 
ing replaced by Steve Clark. 

Darrows Leaves Col 
For Indie Production 

NEW YORK — Jay Darrow has re- 
signed his post as popular A&R pro- 
ducer at Columbia Records. His imme- 
diate plans are “to write and produce 
independently for the major labels.” 

At Columbia, Darrow produced 
Anita Bryant, the Harbingers and 
Shane Martin. Before coming to Col- 
umbia, he was director of publishing 
and recording for the Cameo Parkway 
and worked with such artists as Ques- 
tion Mark and the Mysterians, the 
Five Stairsteps, and Terry Knight. 

Darrow may be reached at (212) BU 
8-3015. 

Presley Car Up In 
Charity Auction 

NEW YORK — RCA’s Elvis Presley 
has donted his $35,000 1964 Rolls 
Royce to SHARE, a Hollywood wo- 
men’s charity group, to go to the 
highest bidder in a nationwide write- 
in auction. 

Bids for the Presley auto, a four- 
door, V-8 powered, limousine with 
midnight blue exterior, grey interior, 
left-hand steering wheel and built-in 
bar & stereo, must be in writing and 
postmarked no later than midnight, 
July 4. Minimum bid is $20,000 and 
each bid must be accompanied by a 
certified check payable to Share, Inc. 
and covering 50% of the bid amount. 
Checks accompanying all but the win- 
ning bid will be returned. 

Bids should go to: SHARE, Inc., 
P.O. Box 1517, Burbank, Calif. 91505. 


WB Goes Mad Aye. 

NEW YORK — Warner Bros. -Seven 
Arts Records has relocated its local 
offices to 488 Madison Ave., N. Y. 
10022. New phone number will be 
(212) PL 9-4422. 


Ernie Freeman 


Cash Dividend 
From Handleman 

DETROIT — The board of directors of 
Handleman Co., the Detroit-based 
rack-jobber, has declared the regular, 
quarterly cash dividend of $.15 per 
on the 2,821,242 common shares out- 
standing, payable July 8, 1968 to stock, 
holders of record on June 21, 1968. 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


9 




1 




BREAKING 

NATIONALLY 




MINI-FILM AVAILABLE 


A 


monumerrt 


is artistry 


Tamborine Records 

DISTRIBUTED BY 
MONUMENT RECORD CORP. 



TWO MEN UP TIGHT— Archie Bell 
found that non-commissioned person- 
nel do get salutes, particularly when 
they have a million-seller certified by 
RIAA. On leave and in New York 
from his Army assignment in Ger- 
many, Bell was presented his gold 
record award at the Atlantic offices 
for “Tighten Up.” To the left of cen- 
ter, with the producer’s plaque, is 
Skipper Lee Frazier who also manages 
Archie Bell & the Drells (from Hous- 
ton, Texas). Outsiders in the photo 
making the presentations are Atlan- 
tic’s Jerry Greenberg (left) and the 
label’s promotion veep Henry Allen. 


Attarack Seattle Branch 

BEVERLY HILLS— The first in a pro- 
posed series of new offices has been 
opened by the Attarack Corp. in 
Seattle under the direction of Jim 
Morgan. The Hollywood-based man- 
agement, publishing and recording 
firm plans to establish regional offices 
in the East, Midwest and the South, 
each to be located in areas not cur- 
rently serviced by the major recording 
and publishing centers in the U.S. 

Morgan, who spent several years in 
Seattle before joining the firm’s pub- 
lishing wing several months ago, plans 
to seek out talent in schools, night- 
clubs, radio and recording studios, the 
best of which will be turned over to 
Seymour Heller, Ray Harris and Ed 
Cobb, Attarack execs, for development. 

Sinatra Wins 
Ampex Award 

PARK RIDGE, ILL.— The 1968 winner 
of the annual Ampex “Artistry In 
Sound” award is Frank Sinatra, who 
records for Reprise Records. The an- 
nouncement was made by Don V. Hall, 
vice president of the Ampex consumer 
and educational products division. 

The Ampex “Artistry In Sound” 
award is presented annually to per- 
formers who have made outstanding 
contributions in the field of recorded 
sound. 

This year’s award is a “shape.” It 
consists of two spheres, one within the 
other, rotating in opposite directions. 
The inner sphere has three oil-on- 
metal portraits depicting Sinatra the 
actor, the singer and the man. The 
outer sphere, symbolic of the world, is 
handbuffed on the inside to reflect the 
portraits as the spheres move. The 
award was designed by sculptor Felipe 
Fabregat to depict Sinatra’s timeless 
style. 

Sinatra is the third winner. Others 
were Mantovani and Herb Alpert and 
the Tijuana Brass. Each year the 
award is designed to match the indi- 
vidual and his achievements in the 
musical world. 


Lundy Adds Trio 

NEW YORK — Columbia lark Pat 
Lundy, whose recent Merv Griffin 
TV’er guest shot has brought her a 
host of major bookings, is putting 
together a self-contained act with the 
addition of a pianist, bassist and 
drummer. Pat opens a 4-week stand at 
Atlanta’s Bird Cage tonight (10) and 
then moves to the Utopia Club, Co- 
lumbus, and the Alpine Villa, Balti- 
more. “iDoes She Ever Remind You Of 
Me,” from Miss Lundy’s LP, has re- 
cently been released as a single. 



Looking! Ahead 


A compilation, in order of strength, of up and coming records showing signs of 
breaking into The Cosh Box Top 100. List is compiled from retail outlets. 


1 LOOK OVER YOUR SHOULDER 

(Ginrick — BMI) 

O'Joys (Bell 704) 

2 MISTER SANDMAN 

(E. H. Morris-ASCAP) 

Bert Koempfert (Decco 32329) 

3 DON'T BREAK MY PRETTY 
BALLOON 

(T. M. Von Me Coy-BMI) 

Vikki Carr (Liberty 56039) 

4 HITCH IT TO THE HORSE 

(Dandelion, James Boy— BMI) 

Fantastic Johnny C. (Phil LA of Soul 315) 

5 turn around look at 

(Hambo— BMI) 

Vogues (Reprise 0686) 

6 MECHANICAL WORLD 

(Hollenbech— BMI) 

Spirit (Ode 708) 

7 YOU SEND ME 

(Kags— BMI) 

Aretha Franklin (Atlantic 2518) 


26 HERE COME THE JUDGE ^ . 

(Part I) 

(Bountiful, BMI) 

Finky Fuzz (Epic 10343) 

27 LAZY SUNDAY ^ 

(Mu— Songs— BMI ) 

Small Faces (Immediate 5007) ^ 

28 any old time 

(January, Welbeck— BMI) ^ ' 

Foundations (Uni 55073) 

29 VALLEY OF THE DOLLS 

(Leo Feist— ASCAP) c a 

King Curtis & Kingpins (Atco 6582) 

30 LISTEN, LISTEN 

,Thirty Four— Labrea— ASCAP) 

Merry Go Round (A&M 920) ^ 

31 AND SUDDENLY 

(Lazy Day— BMI) 

Cherry Jeople (Heritage 801) 

32 I'M GONNA CHANGE 

(Saturday— Seasons— BMI) 

Montanas (Independence 87) 


8 JOURNEY TO THE CENTER 
OF THE MIND 

(Brent-BMI) 

Amboy Dukes (Mainstream 684) 


33 ROCK AROUND THE CLOCK 1 

(Myers-ASCAP) 

Freddie Cannon 

(We Make Rock 'n Roll Record 1601) ^ 


9 STEP INSIDE LOVE 

(Maclen— BMI) 

Cilia Black (Bell 726) 


34 20 YEARS AGO ^ 

(Street-BMI) 

T. C. Atlantic (Parrot 330) 


10 ROSE 

(George M. Cohan— ASCAP) 

Tony bcotti (Liberty 56040) 

11 DON'T SIGN THE PAPER 

(Ala King— BMI) 

Jimmy Delps (Karen 1538) 

12 YOUNG BIRDS FLY 

(Saturday— BMI) 

Cryan' Shames (Columbia 44545) 

13 SHHHHHHH (FOR A LITTLE 
WHILE) 

(Golo-BMI) 

James Brown (King 6164) 

14 HANG EM' HIGH 

(Unart— BMI) 

Hugo Montenego (RCA Victor 9544) 

15 HELULE HELULE 

(Mainstay— BMI) 

Tremeloes (Epic 10328) 

16 ALL THE GREY HAIRED MAN 

(Colgems— ASCAP) 

Lettermen (Capitol 2196) 

17 HE GIVE ME LOVE 

(Dick James— BMI) 

Lesley Gore (Mercury 72819) 

18 FINDERS KEEPERS 

(Kama Sutra— BMI) 

Salt Water Taffy (Buddah 37) 

19 MRS. BLUEBIRD 

(Crocked Foxx— ASCAP) 

Eternity's Children (Tower 416) 

20 YESTERDAY I HEARD 
THE RAIN 

(Dunbar— BMI) 

Tony Bennett (Columbia 44510) 

21 VENUS 

(Rambed, Lans-Dale— BMI) 

Johnny Mathis (Columbia 44517) 

22 be young be foolish be 

HAPPY 

(Low-Twi, Low-Sail— BM!) 

Tams (ABC 11066) 


35 WHAT MADE MILWAUKEE 
FAMOUS 

(Al Gallico-BMI) 

Jerry Lee Lewis (Smash 2164) 

36 SAVE IT 

(Jec, BMI) 

Solomon Burke (Atlantic 2527) 

37 I'VE GOT TO HAVE YOU 

(Myto— BMI) 

Fantastic Four (Ric Tic 139) 

38 GIVE ME ONE MORE CHANCE 

(Tupper-BMI) 

Wilner Alexander & The Dukes 
(Aphrodisiac 260) 

39 SALLY HAD A PARTY 

(125th Street— ASCAP) 

Flavor (Columbia 44521) 

40 WHITE HORSES 

(Francis Day & Hunter— ASCAP) 

Claudine Longet (A&M 936) 

41 BATTLE HYMN OF THE 
REPUBLIC 

(Saturday— BMI) 

Bob Crew Generation (Dynovice 919) 

42 DO I LOVE YOU 

(Motrer Bertha, Hill & Range — BMI) 

Magic Ring (Music Factory 404) 

43 STONE GOOD LOVER 

(Colfam— BMI) 

Jo Armstead (Giant 704) 

44 SUGAR 

(We Three— BMI) 

Jive Five (Musicor 1305) 

45 I need love 

(Golden Voice, Bunker Hill— BMI) 
third Booth (Independence 86) 

46 I GOT TO HAVE YA 

(World Int.-BMI) 

Trolls (U.S.A. 905) 

47 ONLY ME 

(Irving— BMI) 

First Edition (Reprise 0683) 




« 

•f) 




-A 

I Al 

<1 


A. 



-s 

4 





23 YOUNG BOY 

(Conrad— BMI) 

Barbara Greene Renee 5001) 


48 ELEVATOR 

(York-ASCAP) 

Grapefruit (Equinox 70005) ^ 


24 SEND MY BABY BACK 

(Hackney- Voice— BMI) 

Freddie Hughes (Wand 1182) 

25 BACKWARDS & FORWARDS 

(Low-Twi— BMI) 

December's Children (World Pacific 77887) 


49 BOTH SIDES NOW 

(Sequomb— BMI) 

Harpers Bizarre (Warner Bros. 7 Arts 7200) 

50 I'V GOT TO HOLD ON 

(Cudda Pane— BMI) 

Ohio Players (Compass 7081) 


10 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 






HERE COME THE JUDGE 
PIGMEAT MARKHAM 


Chess 2049 


PICTURES OF MATCHSTICK MEN 

STATUS QUO 


Cadet Concept 7001 


HOLD ON 
THE RADIANTS 


Chess 2037 



Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


11 



thanlc vou 


Disk Jockeys, 

Record Librarians, 
Program Directors, 
Performers 
and A&R Men 
for making these 
six BMI Awards 
possible 

★ LADY 

★ SPANISH EYES 

★ STRANGERS IN THE NIGHT 

★ SWEET MARIA 

★ THE WHEEL OF HURT 

★ THE WORLD WE KNEW 
(OVER AND OVER) 


ROOSEVELT MUSIC CO., INC 

1650 Broadway • New York, New York 10019 • (212) CO 5-1063 
Hal Fein, President — Jerry Brown, Gen 7 Mgr. 

Murray Baker • Howie Kane • Jonathan Rowlands 

Americas Leading Independent Publisher 


2 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 



CashBox Record Roviews 



Picks ot the Week ) 

4 SEASONS (Philips 40542) 

Saturday’s Father (3:14) [Gavadima, Genius, ASCAP-Gaudio, Holmes] 

Drastic shift in theme material for the team on this new offering. The 4 
Seasons deliver one of their most creative sides on “Saturday’s Father,’’ a 
poignant view of the once-a-week visiting father. Production techniques, 
the splendid vocal working of the group, and outstanding material creates 
a shattering session from the hitmakers. Flip: “Good-Bye Girl” (3:14) 
[Saturday, Seasons Four, BMI-Crewe, Gaudio] 

ARTHUR CONLEY (Atco 6588) 

People Sure Act Funny (2:10) [Bob-Dan, BMI — Turner, McDougal] 

Rapid-fire rhythmics and a solid vocal workout bring Arthur Conley into a 
Sam & Dave bag on his snappy new side. Artist follows his top 20 showing on 
“Funky Street” with another explosive track that should break wide open on 
both pop and blues fronts. Heavy sales action can be expected to put the 
track high in the best seller running. Flip: “Burning Fire” (2:20) [Redwal, 
Time, BMI — Conley, Dowd] 

DONOVAN (Epic 10345^ 

Hurdy Gurdy Man (3:15) [Peer Int’l, BMI-Leitch] 

Another new phase in the development of Donovan begins with this new 
effort, “Hurdie Gurdie Man.” Lyric presents a transcendental love & word 
play message, but the musical backing has shifted from the small jazz 
combo style of “Wear Your Love Like Heaven” and “Jennifer Juniper” to an 
easy folk -f electric rock & sitar blend. Already breaking, the side should 
be a big one. Flip: “Teen Angel” (2:16) [Same credits.] 


ROYAL GUARDSMEN (Laurie 3451) 

Snoopy for President (2:49) [Roznique, BMI-Holler, Schapiro, Gernhard] 

Back once more to the Peanuts mystique, the Royal Guardsmen revive 
their rock-march romp rhythm with a timely application of election cam- 
paign theme and the current “Snoopy for President” movement in a novelty 
dance track that should hit the sales impact of their three previous snoopy 
ventures. Bouncing beat and cute commentary add up to breakout power. 
Flip: “Down Behind the Lines” (3:27) [Roznique, BMI — Holler] 

PAUL REVERE & THE RAIDERS (Columbia 44553) 

Don’t Take It So Hard (2:27) [Boom, BMI — Lindsay] 

Bright bouncing rhythmics and a teen-tailored lyric give Paul Revere and 
the Raiders their most commercial single in some time. Belting dance flavor 
is boomed out with hand-clap and hard drum backdrop. Good crisp vocals 
soften for a pleasant pause in the action. Side is a flashy one aimed to hit 
top forty. Flip: “Observation from Flight 285” (2:48) [same credits] 

BILLY VERA (Atlantic 2526) 

With Pen in Hand (3:32) [Unart, BMI — Goldsboro] 

“Honey” has renewed interest in Bobby Goldsboro as an artist, and “With 
Pen in Hand” has started to kindle attention for his songwriter talent. Al- 
ready a country single with pop repercussions, the tenderly tearful song is 
headed for a big reception in this reading set for top forty and middle-of-the 
road audiences by the male half of the “Storybook Children” team. Flip: 
“Good Morning Blues” (2:57) [Blackwood, BMI — Vera] 


BLUE CHEER (Philips 40541) 

Just a Little Bit (3:24) [Blue Cheer, BMI-Peterson] 

Voluminous, vigorous vitality in tune with the fiery psychedelia of the 
discotheque scene brings the Blue Cheer back for another shot at the 
breakout furor that greeted their premiere “Summertime Blues” disk. 
Dynamic drive that creates an enveloping sound pours out this blasting 
side with hit power. Flip: “Gypsy Ball” (2:57) [Blue Cheer, BMI-Stevens, 
Peterson] 


LULU (Epic 10346) 

Boy (2:30) [Peer Int’l, BMI-Stephens, Blaikley] 

Sticking with the antic-rock sound of “Me, the Peaceful Heart,” Lulu 
bounds back for a solid shot at the breakout department. Her vocals have 
more of the gliding quality that clicked on “To Sir with Love,” and could 
turn the trick in setting sales in motion for the teen rock outing. Fine dance 
side with the potential to bring in another winning showing. Flip: “Sad 
Memories” (2:05) [Maluma, BMI-London] 


CHER (Imperial 66307) 

Take Me For a Little While (2:40) [Lollipop, BMI-Martin] 

Fine lyric that comes up tailor made for the teen deck fans brings Cher 
back for a strong run at the best seller lists. Track is a medium-slow 
workout with strong arrangements that spotlight a good blues-organ backup 
and the rhythmic appeal of the song. Outstanding production of some very 
fine material makes the side a potential smash. [No flip info available.] 

LETTERMEN (Capitol 2218) 

Where Were You When The Lights Went Out (1:33) [Hastings, BMI-Grusin, 
Gordon] 

Pretty material from the new movie “Where Were You When the Lights 
Went Out” poses a problem to the current Lettermen single “All The Grey 
Haired Men.” This lovely melodic piece could steal the spotlight with 
extra impact given by the film opening. Flip: “Love Is Blue/Greensleeves” 
(2:15) [Croma/P.D., ASCAP-Blackburn, Cour, Popp] Medley beautifully done 
with exceptional easy listening potential. 


SOLOMON BURKE (Atlantic 2527) 

Save It (2:12) [Jec, BMI-Bryant] 

Breaking out of his slow string of releases, Solomon Burke moves into 
high gear on a socking side that adds dance drive to his already solid 
personal fan appeal. Plenty of pressure in the delivery gives the artist an 
excellent prospect for r&b market acceptance and a possibly sizeable spill- 
over into the pop sales show. Flip: “Met Me in the Church” (3:33) [Tree, 
BMI-Tex] 


Q Picks oi the Week ^ 

FATS DOMINO (Reprise 0696) 

Honest Papas Love Their Mamas Better (2:27) [Sweet Magnolia, BMI-Zompa, 
DeCaesar] 

Clear fresh breeze from the rock archives, this reincarnation of Fats 
Domino brings the artist back with the flair and vigor that helped establish 
the sound of rock. Belting rhythmics and the combination of Domino’s 
unique vocal-piano style sparkle once more for a sensational side that should 
become a moving sales item with r&b and pop fans. Flip: “One for the High- 
way” (2:30) [Don Hall, Tamerlane, BMl-Domino] 


PARLIAMENTS (Revilot 223) 

Good Old Music (2:50) [Lebaron, BMI-Clinton, Funkadelics] 

Change of pace outing for the Parliaments retains the chord structure and 
appeal of their “Testify” smash, but eases up on the pace for a funky side 
with super-fine hit magnetism. Slow soul dance effort that should bring the 
team high into the r&b sales standing with an excellent shot at pop break- 
out on the followthrough. Flip: “Time” (2:40) [Lebaron, BMI-Clinton, Lewis] 


PHIL FLOWERS (Dot 17113) 

The Alligator (2:59) [Shifting Flowers, BMI-Flowers, McCoy] 

Rising blues reputation of Phil Flowers should get a hefty boost from this 
wild outing that brings the artist-writer up with a new dance that features 
some strenuous work, change-of-pace tempo and a cute sound effect appli- 
cation to drum up a bright reception. Deck has the power to crack r&b and 
pop sales fronts. Flip: “The Judge & the Alligator” (1:57) [Same pub, BMI- 
Flowers, Shifrin] 


LITTLE MILTON (Checker 1203) 

At the Dark End of the Street (2:59) [Press, BMI-Penn, Morman] 

Exceptional workout from Little Milton on a fine slow ballad gives the 
side a strong prospect of breaking out through the r&b grapevine into a size- 
able pop hit as well. Track’s lamenting tale of secret-meeting lovers is en- 
hanced by some very fine arrangements, and the closing build puts a final 
thrust to the effort. Flip: “I Who Have Nothing” (2:36) [Milky Way, Trio, Cotil- 
lion, BMI-Mogol, Donida, Leiber, Stoller] 

MOBY GR^ (Columbia 4456^ ~ ~~ 

Can’t Be So Bad (3:22) [Gemini, BMI-Miller] 

Belting percussion and rhythmic ranting in a loose blues style treated 
to the updating influence of psychedelic groupwork mark the first single 
in some time from the LP hitsters, Moby Grape. Team has had decks click 
before, and the fan following already aware of the crew will combine with 
new admirers to make this a breakout side. Flip: “Bitter Wind” (2:42) 
[Gemini, BMI-Mosley] 


WILDWEEDS (Cadet Concept 7004) 

I’m Dreaming (2:40) [Trod Nossel, BMI-Anderson] 

Acting under the influence of the Small Faces sound, the Wildweeds 
come back with another power-packed single that should shake up a lot 
of listening action along the top 40 route. Team’s scintillating orchestral 
end and a bright vocal performance from both lead and group singers 
give the side enough explosive impact to score with best seller sales. 
Flip: “Happiness is Just an Illusion” (2:25) [Linesider, BMI-Anderson] 


BARRY MANN (Capitol 2217) 

I Just Can’t Help Believin’ (2:50) [Screen Gems, Columbia, BMI-Mann, Weil] 
Very pretty ballad that features the flowing gentleness of “Suzanne” and 
Glen Campbell pop-folk liquidity to weave an attractive spell that can be 
expected to entrance many pop and middle-of-the-road disk jockies. 
Peaceful song in a glowing performance that is likely to reach breakout 
proportions bringing an artist reputation to the established songwriter. 
Flip: “Where Do I Go From Here” (3:23) [Same credits.] 

VAN & TITUS (Elf 90016) 

Cry Baby Cry (3:10) [Sons of Ginza, BMI-Cason, Gayden] 

Outstanding side with an easy-going pace and some very fine vocal 
work from Van & Titus. Team had a near hit last time out, and should 
get the action to explode on r&b and pop scenes with this new effort. 
Crisp duo chanting and a hefty orchestral underline sets the stage for 
deejay and listener response. A little work should make this one a best 
seller. Flip: “The Vulture” (2:40) [Mesquite, ASCAP-Hampton, Whitson] 

WAYNE NEWTON (MGM 13955) ~~ 

Dreams of the Everyday Housewife (3:03) [Combine, BM 1-Gantry] 

Making use of his appeal to the young adult and older feminine fans, 
Wayne Newton should win a tremendous exposure and sales approval with 
this attractive rendering of the Chris Gantry tune “Dreams of the Everyday 
Housewife.” Fine melodic appeal and lyrical content masterfully handled 
should make the side a big one. Flip: “The Tip of My Fingers” (2:41) 
[Tree, BMI-Anderson] 


JERRY VALE (Columbia 44572) 

With Pen In Hand (3:17) [Unart, BMI-Goldsboro] 

Third single of this powerful song has stiff competition for top 40 
market action, but guarantes success by aiming dead center at the adult, 
easy listening audience for reception. As always, the Jerry Vale vocal 
presents excellent fare, and his emotional delivery of the tender track 
makes it a standout for soft-sound stations and one-stop servicing 
adult jukebox locations. Flip: “The Look of Love” (3:25) [Colgems, ASCAP- 
Bacharach, David] 


STEVE ALAIMO (Atco 6589) 

My Friend (2:58) [Press, BMI — Fritts, Oldham] 

Recent regional success for “Denver” has brought new interest to Steve 
Alaimo in several areas across the country, setting the stage for a bright 
showing with this sentimental track. Love story of a girl grown-up is excel- 
lently phrased and performed with a string backdrop that could bring the 
pop middle-of-the-road outlets on the songster’s bandwagon. Has a very 
strong shot at better than sleeper reaction. Flip “1 x’s 1 Ain’t 22” (2:11) 
[Acuff-Rose, Bmi — Newbury] 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


13 




shBox Record Bbvmcws 



Newcomer Picks 

ILLINOIS SPEED PRESS (Columbia 44564) 

Get in the Wind (Vocal) (2:55) [Aphrodite, BMI — Cotton] 

Riding a hurricane of sound, the Illinois Speed Express fills its sails with 
a drive that should have them blazing up the best seller lists with particular 
impact in shows programming “underground” music. Psyche-blues with a 
throbbing beat for above-ground teen fans; fine lyrics and a standout group 
performance make this side a powerhouse effort with winner-circle prospect. 
Flip: “Get in the Wind (Instrumental)” (2:55) [Same credits] 

PICARDY (Dunhill 4140) 

5:30 Plane (2:55) [Canopy, ASCAP-Webb] 

Lyrical coasting of a Fifth Dimension outing broadens with use of harmon- 
ies much like the Mamas & Papas or the Association to give this new team a 
sound not really new but certainly solidly steeped in sales impact. Mix well 
with a bright-etherial composition from Jim Webb and you’ve got “5:30 
Plane” for a flight whose destination is set for the pop charts. Flip: “In the 
Name of You” (1:59) [Canopy, ASCAP-Merriam] 


GLORIA LORING (MGM 13942) 

Chelsea Morning (3:00) [Gandalf, BMI-Mitchell] 

Spotlighted with Aretha Franklin on the recent television special, Gloria 
Lcring should find a big welcome in store for this powerful ballad with a 
bounce. Lyrical brii iance is matched by a fine vocal and some dance-aimed 
instrumental backing. Teen exposure is built-in, and the lid is smooth 
enough to stir response from middle-of-the-road stations boosting sales to 
strong action. Flip: [No info available.] 

AMAZERS (Thomas 1638) 

It’s You for Me (3:10) [Camad, BMI-Crayton] 

Already eliciting responses in several r&b markets, this stylish side 
could break wide open for the Amazers on a national level. Terrific teen 
harmonies delivered with a bubbling instrumental interweave the power of a 
dance motion with some emotional impact that could spillover into pop 
marketplaces. Might happen in a very big way. Flip: “Without a Warning” 
(1:40) [Camad, BMI-Brown] 

SILVER APPLES (Kapp 923) 

Oscillations (2:47) [Magic Theatre Partnership, BMI — ^Warren, Taylor, Simeon] 
Inventive application of electronic music to a rock theme with an acute 
blend of avant garde instrumental work and primitive percussion take this 
work from the Silver Apples a step or three beyond the work of Country Joe 
& the Fish. Verbal picture tuned to the music and a Gertrude Stein-like 
repetition-alchemy delivers a work of contemporary impact that should 
come up for excessive “underground” programming. Flip: “Whirly-Bird” (2:39) 
[Same credits] 



Q Best Bets 

CLASSICS IV (Imperial 66304) 
Mama’s & Papa’s (2:06) [Low-Sal, 
BMI-Buie, Cobb] Exceptional side 
from the “Spooky” and' “Soul Train” 
team has a cute hand-clap rhythm and 
mid-speed tempo that makes it good 
for dance fans and a good track to 
perk up top 40 listening. Flip: “Waves” 
(2:14) [Same credits.] 

ROBERT KNIGHT (Rising Sons 709) 
Rainbow Valley (3:18) [Sons of Ginza, 
BMI-Cason, Gayden] The “Everlasting 
Love” man is on the scene with a 
splendid side that could relight his hit 
fire. Gentle lyric is delivered with a 
lively rhythmic thrust that could kick 
off a hit reaction. Flip: “Sandy” (3:28) 
[Buckhorn, BMI-Wilkin, Cason] 

VAL DOONICAN (Decca 32337) 

Now (2:38) [Dick James, BMI-Mayer, 
Bradtke, Black] Easy listening mate- 
rial with a sparkling beat and some 
unusual arrangements to set the sound 
apart give Val Doonican a shot at 
matching his English success here on 
the Atlantic’s other side. Flip: “The 
Sun Always Shines When You’re 
Young” (2:48) [Lorna, Doonican, 
Pavey] 

MELANIE (Columbia 44524) 

Garden In 'The City (2:45) [United, 
Amelanie ASCAP-Safka] The simple, 
wistful aura of this Melanie deck gives 
it a good shot at heavy programming, 
especially from FM outlets. A charm- 
ing piece. Flip: “Why Didn’t My 
Mother Tell Me” (2:45) [Amelanie 
ASCAP-Safka] 


MAGNIFICENT 7 (Dial 4074) 

Ooh, Baby Baby (2:59) [Jobete BMI- 
Moore, Robinson] Lightning has al- 
ready struck twice as regards this 
tune (once with the Miracles and again 
with the Five Stairsteps) and the 
Magnificent 7 are trying for a third. 
Could do it, too. Flip: “Never Will I” 
(2:35) [Twig BMI-Himon] 


) 

SPIRAL STARECASE (Columbia 
44566) 

I’ll Run (1:52) [Trousdale, BMI-Page] 
Could be the side that makes this team. 
Follow up to a noise-making effort, 
“I’ll Run” packs a mid-speed tempo 
tune done up in high style with good 
dance power and a fine vocal sound. 
Little top 40 exposure needed to break 
the lid into best seller ranks. Flin: 
“Inside, Outside, Upside Down” (2:24) 
[Yuma, ASCAP-Meskell, Post] 


ENCHANTED FOREST (Variations 
50010) 

I’m Not That Kind of Girl (2:12) 
[Quintessence, BMI-Enchanted Forest] 
Soft femme sound in a whispery group 
vocal driven home by some slow-rock- 
ing rhythmics and a fine instrumental 
support. Team had a very good outing 
to this an dcould now add many new 
fans. Flip: “The Word is Love” (2:41) 
[Kyrie, BMI-Lenox] 


ROGER NICHOLS (A&M 946) 

Let’s Ride (2:50) [Irving, BMI-Nic- 
hold, Williams] Soft sounds of a pretty 
group vocal that builds in volume and 
picks up the pace along the way make 
this very attractive side an ear teaser 
that could spring into the best seller 
circle. Well done session might stir 
middle-of-the-road exposure as did the 
group’s last LP. [No flip info available.] 


SERENDIPITY SINGERS (United 
Artists 50317) 

Rain Doll (2:27) [Serendipity, BMI- 
Holmes] Vet group comes up with a 
highly commercial rock-ballad sound 
on this new release. Last effort cracked 
the Top 100, and this soft-beat tune 
should fare even better. Count on some 
good music play also. Flip: “Love Is 
A State Of Mind” (2:57) [Serendipity, 
BMI-Brovsky, Holmes] 


Q Best Bets 

BLOOD, SWEAT & TEARS (Colum- 
bia 44559) 

I Can’t Quit Her (3:38) [Sea- Lark, 
BMI-Kooper] Culled from the group’s 
current chart-riding LP, both sides of 
this new single have the goods to 
achieve a chart berth. Slight edge to 
“Can’t Quit,” a highly danceable blues 
piece. Flip: “House In The Country” 
(3:05 [Same credits.] 


DAPPS FEATURING ALFRED EL- 
LIS (King 6169) 

There Was A Time (2:29) [Golo, 
BMI-Brown, Hobgood] James Brown 
produced this has-to-be-heard instru- 
mental reworking of his while back 
hit. Albert Ellis’ hard driving sax stirs 
this side to a frenzy sure to make it a 
disko favorite. Should produce good 
sales. Flip: “The Rabbit Got The 
Gun” (2:35) [Golo, BMI-Brown, Hob- 
good, Lavong] 


BOBBY SKEL (Uni 55071) 

Sheila Ann (2:57) [Le Bill/Duchess, 
BMI-Skelton] Bobby Skel turns in a 
pro job on this self -penned name song. 
Medium paced rocker pulls a switch 
and winds up with a happy ending. 
Worth some spins. Flip: “'Three Can- 
dles” (2:03) [LeBill, BMI-Skelton] 


RIVERBOAT SOUL BAND (Mercury 
72870) 

Catch A Falling Star (2:25) [Marvin, 
ASCAP-Vance, Pockriss] Perry Como 
will have a hard time recognizing this 
reworking of his years-back hit. Done 
up in funky, sock-it-to-me style, it’ll 
be right up there in chart competition. 
Flip: “Mess Up” (2:34) [G-Clef, 
ASCAP-Farrar] 


MISTER JIM & THE RHYTHM MA- 
CHINE (Date 1611) 

Mrs. Robinson (2:46) [Charing Cross, 
BMI-Simon] Instrumental version of 
the #1 Simon & Garfunkel song fea- 
tures a Ramsey Lewis styling that 
should capture spinoff showings on 
many pop stations and gain favor with 
middle-of-the-road deejays. Flip: “Car- 
nival” (2:19) [April, Horizpic, ASCAP- 
Hamlisch] Perky theme from “The 
Swimmer.” 


MUSIC COMBINATION (American 
Music Makers 0016) 

Crystal (2:32) [Jillbem, BMI-Knight, 
Neiman] Attractive group vocals with 
a gentle rock feel and delightful cho- 
rale backing could establish a sales 
foothold for this outing from the Music 
Combination. Nice change-of-pace 
track that could pick up top 40 ex- 
posure. Flip: “Holding on for Dear 
Love” (2:37) [Same credits.] 


TOMMY FAIA & TRUE BLUE 
FACTS (A & M 945) 

Rain, Rain, Rain, Rain (2:29) [Chap- 
pel, ASCAP-Haber] Pounding, melodic 
rocker that could bring national atten- 
tion to the True Blue Facts. A group 
to watch. Flip: “The Boy I Left Be- 
hind” (2:28) [For-Church, BMI- For- 
syth, McGinnis] 


DAUGHTERS OF ALBION (Fontana 
1619) 

Well Wired (3:05) [Skyhill, BMI- 
Dempsey, Luff] Well done fast-flowing 
stand with catchy instrumental effects 
could establish the Daughters of 
Albion as hitmakers. One to watch. 
Flip: “Story Of Sad” (2:49) [Same 
credits.] 


I 


MARILYN MAYE (RCA Victor 9560) 
Montage from “How Sweet It Is” 
(2:32) [Nat’l. Gen., ASCAP-Webb] 1 
Always an artist with built in easy-*- 
listening acceptance, Marilyn Maye 
has an especially strong release with 
this Jim Webb composition. Mixture?! 
of novelty lyric and straight ballad' 
material could spread into the top 
forty market too. Flip: “On to Some- 
thing New” (2:32) [Helios, BMI-ijp 
Ogerman, English] Bright easybeat | 
type of ballad with less cuteness and4^ 
more listening power. 




I 


THREE DEGREES (Warner Bros.' I 
7198) 

Contact (2:30) [Zig Zag, Anerclasa 
BMI-Barrett, Collins] Smooth vocal 
performance with a strong underlying" 
rhythm highlights this one from thet 
Three Degrees. Certainly worth a few V 
spins from deejays. Flip: “No, No, Not[]^ 
Again” [Gil BMI-Weiss, Pockriss] 'K 


TIMI YURO (Liberty 56049) 
Something Bad On My Mind (2:53)|! 
[Francis, Day & Hunter, ASCAP-l 
Reed, Mason] Solid reentry into the] 
pop field after a lengthy absence isi 
accomplished by Timi Yuro on a throb- 3 
bing, slow paced ballad with bombshell 3 
production to kick off top 40 responses. ' 
Likely to explode. Flip: “Wrong”,i 
(2:26) [Sure-Fire, BMI-Yuro, Staed- 
ler] 


UPSETTERS (ABC 11081) 

Tossin’ & Turnin’ (1:54) [Viva, Har-"l 
vard, BMI-Adamo, Rene] Punching I 
out the beat with a definite accent on, 
dance-fan reaction, the Upsetters pour I 


on the fuel in a blazing revival ofg 
“Tossin’ & Turnin’ ” that could bring,® 


them r&b breakout and a pop response.! 
Flip: “Always in the Wrong Place at 
the Wrong Time” (3:40) [Double 
Diamond, BMI-Gilmore, White, Ma-_ 
dara] 


DUANE EDDY (Reprise 0690) 

The Satin Hours (2:42) [Richbare, 
BMI-Adpt: Glasser, Page] Retitled 
and popped up a bit, this rendering of 
Mozart’s melody (used in “Elvira 
Madigan”) comes in for special atten- 
tion with the movie theme competi- 
tion. Delightful pairing of “twangy 
guitar” and misty strains. Flip: “Niki 
Hoeky” (2:27) [Novalene, BMI-Vegas, 
Vegas, Ford] 


JACK BEDIENT & CHESSMAN (Co 
lumbia 44565) 

The Pleasure Of You (2:33) [Viva/ 
Blackwood, BMI - Fuller, Puckett] 
Jerry Fuller, who cuts the Union Gap, 
produced this debut session by the 
Chessman. Strong ballad with over- 
powering arrangement in the Gap 
tradition could go the same chart 
route. Flip: “It’s Over” (2:53) [Acuff- 
Rose, BMI-Orbison, Dees] 


SAM BAKER (Sound Stage 7 2613) 
Cornin’ To Bring You Some Soul 
(3:00) [Cape Ann, BMI-Whitworth, 
Baker, Miller] This down-home blues 
number gets down to the nitty-gritty 
and could mean big things for Sam 
Baker. Good dance number. Flip: “I 
Can’t Break Away” (2:22) [Same 
credits.] 


ROGER WASHINGTON (Eagle 103) 
You’re Gonna Want Me (2:28) Roger 
Washington puts a whole lot of soul 
into this talking blues number and 
could talk himself onto a whole lot of 
R&B turntables. A sleeper. Flip: 
“Take It Slow” (2:25) 


BEST OF FRIENDS (Laurie 3450) 
Melodies (2:29) [Novia/S&J, ASCAP- 
Dee] Strong circus feel to this well 
done ditty could give the Best Of 
Friends an edge in the tight chart 
race. Top 40 jocks should take to it. 
Flip: “All The World Is Mine” (2:02) 
[Novia, S&J, ASCAP-Shaffer] 


THIRD BOOTH (Independence 86) 

I Need Love (2:17) [Golden Voice/ 
Bunker Hill, BMI-Clore] The Third 
Booth comes on with a no-punches- 
pulled rocker from the Buckinghams 
school. Danceable and listenable item 
could prove to be a summer vunner. 
Flip: “Mysteries” (1:40) [Same 

credits.] 


14 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 



OHiRANTEE 

m ONE RECOm UMITEO 

Guarantees citizens of the United States first class product at all times and 
to their independent producers world wide release of products selected. 


One in five 
of first fifty 
records released 
inU.K. 
made Top 10. 


RELEASES 


PAGE ONE REOORDSlIMirED 

71 /75 New Oxford Street, 

London W.C.I, Eng. 

Distributed by 

Bell Records Limited, New York. 


sh Box — June 15, 1968 


15 





THE DELLS 

WEAR IT ON 
OUR FACE 

CADET 5599 


ETTA JAMES 

I GOT 
YOU BABE 

CADET 5606 


LITTLE MILTON 

AT THE DARK 
END DF 
THE STREET 

CHECKER 1203 


SOULFUL STRINGS 

THE DOCK 
OF THE BAY 

CADET 5607 


GENE CHANDLER 

RIVER OF TEARS 

CHECKER 1199 


CHESS 

RECORDS 


CqshBox Radio Jtciive 


A survey of key radio stations in all important markets throughout the country to determine by percentage of those 
reporting which releases are being added to station play lists this week for the first time and also the degree of cow J 
centration combining previous reports. Percentage figures on left indicate how many of the stations reporting 
week have added the following titles to their play list for the first time. Percentage figures on right irKlude total 
from left plus the percentage title received in prior week or weeks. ■ 


TALLY COMPLETED JUNE 5, 1968— COVERS PRECEDING WEEK 


% OF STATIONS 

ADDING TITLES TO TITLE ARTIST LABEL 

PROG. SCHED. 

THIS WEEK 


52% 

50% 

49% 

45% 

42% 

36% 

34% 

32% 

31% 

30% 

28% 

27% 

24% 

23% 

22% 

21 % 

20 % 

18% 

17% 

16% 

15% 

13% 

12 % 

11 % 

10 % 


Lady Will Power — Gary Puckett & Union Gap — Columbia 

Somethings You Never Get Used To — 

Diana Ross & Supremes — Motown 

D. W. Washburn — Monkees — Colgems 

Jumpin' Jack Flash — Rolling Stones — London 

Let Yourself Go — Elvis Presley — RCA 

Eyes Of A New York Woman — B. J. Thomas — Scepter 

Grazin' In The Grass — Hugh Masekela — UNI 

The Story Of Rock & Roll — Turtles — White Whale 

Hurdy Gurdy Man — Donovan — Epic 

Here Come De Judge — Shorty Long — Soul 

People Sure Get Funny — Arthur Conley — Atco 

Eleanor Rigby — Ray Charles — ABC 

Here Come De Judge — The Magistrates — MGM 

With Pen in Hand — Billy Vera — Atlantic 

Baby You Come Rollin' Across My Mind — 

Peppermint Trolly Co. — Acta 

Folsom Prison Blues — Johnny Cash — Columbia 

The Horse — Cliff Nobles & Co. — Phil L.A. Of Soul 

Your Time Hasn't Come Yet — Elvis Presley — RCA 

It's Nice To Be With You — Monkees — Colgems 

Lovin' Season — Gene & Debbe — TRX 

Safe In My Garden- — Mamas & Papas — DunhIII 

He Gives Me Love — Lesley Gore — Mercury 

Lover's Holiday — Peggy Scott & Jo Jo Bensen — SSS Int'l 

Stone Soul Picnic — 5th Dimension — Soul City 

Young Boy — Barbara Greene — Renee 


TOTAL % OF -a 
STATIONS TO HAVE 
ADDED TITLES TO 
PROG. SCHED. A 
TO DATE 


1 

97% i 

89% 

J 

49% 

95% I 

42% ^ 

58% 

69% * 

32% 

i 

31% 


30% 

28% 

42% 

24% 

23% 


64% 


33% ^ 

99% 

18 % 

17% 

41% 

92% 

13% 

20% 

97% 

18% 


LESS THAN 10% — BUT MORE THAN 5% 


Total % To Date 


Let Me Be Lonely — 
Dionne Warwick — Scepter 


37% 


Mrs Bluebird — Eternities — 
Tower 

OiUllllllllllllllllllllllliyilllUlllllllllUlllW 


9% 


Sky Pilot — Eric Burdon & 
Animals — MGM 


50% 


Sometimes You Just Can't Win — 
Mouse & The Traps — 

Fraternity 36 % 


Sally Had A Party — Flavor — 
Columbia 8% 

Yes Sir, That's My Baby — 

Julius Wechter & 

Baja Marimba Band — A&M 22% 


i nn I 

Cash Box — June 15, 1963 


16 




A Musical Event: 
The 4 Seasons 

Saturday's Father 40542 
Featuring the "sound" of Frankie Valli 

She wakes them in the early light 
They're going to go away 
She dresses them in party clothes 
She ties their hair in colored bows 
Today is father's day. 

Fie said he'll be there right on time 
Fie'll be there come what may 
Fie'll take them to a puppet show 
The little one can't wait to go 
Today is father's day. 

See him always smiling, full of games to pit 
Fun to have a daddy every Saturday. 

Fie brings them home by suppertime 
To where he used to stay 
And so they kiss him on the cheek 
She sees him off, but they don't speak 
Today was father's day. 

Reprinted by permission of 
Gavadima-Genius (ASCAP) 

Written by B. Gaudio & J. Hoimes 
Arranged & Directed by Bob Gaudio 
Produced by Bob Crewe 



/t/ ™ //// \\\S 

//// \\\\ /// / 1 \ m 

//// 1 nv\n/j 1 u\ArrriiiiiL mmm 

CoshBox Sure Shots 

TTHT! Vi\\\ TTT'^TTTnxmTr 

ww [ liti \\\\ //// V\\\ //// 

Xrotw \v\\ //y vCTw 

The Cosh Box "Sure Shots" highlight records which reports from 
nation indicate ore oiready beginning to sell quantity or else give 

retoil dealers throughout the 
every indication of doing so. 

D. W. WASHBURN 

Monkees 

• 


PEOPLE SURE ACT FUNNY 

Arthur Conley 

• 


THE STORY OF ROCK & ROLL 

Turtles 

White Whale 

LET YOURSELF GO 

Elvis Presley 

RCA 

ELEANOR RIGBY 

Ray Charles 

• 

ABC 

irs NICE TO BE WITH YOU 

Monkees 


HURDY GURDY MAN 

Donovan 


YOUR TIME HASNT COME YET BABY 

Elvis Presley 

RCA 

HERE COMES DE JUDGE 

Pigmeat Markham 


LOVIN' SEASON 

Gene & Debbe 

TRX 

WHISKEY ON A SUNDAY 

Irish Rovers 



SHIRELLES JOIN BLUE ROCK— 
Blue Rock rolled along last week with 
the signing of the Snirelles and ap- 
pointment of 25 independent distribu- 
tors for national coverage of releases 
from the Mercury r&b subsidiary. The 
label has kicked off its talent depart- 
ment roster with the inking of Junior 
Wells and the Shirelles, both of whom 
will have singles released shortly. At 
the contract table, the Shirelles were 
joined for signing ceremonies by B.iR.’s 
national promotion manager Boo Fraz- 
ier (2nd from left), product manager 
Abe Chayet (center), and the group’s 
producer Randy Irwin of Dav-Mar 
Productions. Individually, the girls are 
Doris Kenner (left), Beverly Lee and 
Micki Harris with Shirley Alston 
seated. Abe Chayet also noted that 
Blue Rock had lined up 25 distributors 
which will carry the first two singles 
being released. The firms are; All 
State in Chicago, Seaway of Cleve- 
land, Empire in New York, Apex- 
Martin in Newark, Philadelphia’s Uni- 
versal, Schwartz Bros, for Washing- 
ton, D.C., Southland in Atlanta, Cam- 


pus of Miami, Gold Record in Buffalo, 
Roberts of St. Louis, Cincinnati’s 
Supreme, Music Merchants in Detroit, 
Music City in Nashville, Bertos of 
Charlotte, Seaboard in East Hartford, 
John O’Brien in Milwaukee, Denver’s 
Action, Heilicher Bros, in Minneapolis, 
California Distribs in Los Angeles, 
Huffine in Seattle, B&K of Dallas, 
H. R. Basford in San Francisco, Bos- 
ton’s Disc, Delta in New Orleans and 
Memphis-Delta of Memphis. 


Ho Studio LP 

BEVERLY HILLS— Don Ho comple- 
ted his latest Reprise album last week, 
“Live At The (locoanut Grove” — ^but 
in a Hollywood recording studio. 

Ho’s recent (May 7) engagement at 
the Cocoanut Grove was marred by the 
non-arrival of some instruments and 
his own sound system and the studio 
session was held to do a few pick-ups. 

Reprise recorded Ho’s live perform- 
ance at various times during his SRO 
two- week engagement. 


Bell Inks Indie Deals, 

NEW YORK — Several new produc- 
tion and distribution deals between 
Bell Records and indie producers were 
announced last week by label president 
Larry Uttal. 

Acuff-Rose Music’s Wesley Rose will 
produce C&W product for the “Bell 
Country Series” logo. First artist 
under the new pact will be Redd 
Stewart, whom Rose will cut in the 
next few weeks. 

Producer Wes Farrell’s Coral Rock 
firm will cut a new instrumental group. 
Central Park, Joe Gottfried Produc- 
tions will wax the Sweet Wine group 
and Van McCoy will cut Chris Bartley 
and other artists. In addition. Bell will 
distribute McCoy’s Vando Records. 

Lincoln Chase of Links Inc. Creative 
Productions has already completed 
sessions for a soon-due single by 
Shirley Ellis (of “Name Game” and 
“Nitty Gritty” fame) and Top Talent 
producer Si Siman is readying the first 
Ronnie Self sides. In a distribution/ 
production pact with Mona-Lee Rec- 


Tetra Deep Purple Rights 

BEVERLY HILLS— The recording 
rights for the U.S., Canada, and Japan 
to a new English rock group called 
Deep Purple have been acquired by 
Tetragrammaton Records, it has been 
announced by Arthur Mogul, president 
of the label. 

ITie group, currently popular in 
England and on the Continent, has 
also been signed by E.M.I., who will 
retain world rights aside from the 
U.S., Canada, and Japan. 

Initial single and LP, “Deep Pur- 
ple,” produced by English indie pro- 
ducer Derek Lawrence, will be re- 
leased by Tetragrammaton within a 
month. Deep Purple also plans an 
American tour in early September. 

Tetragrammaton is highly pleased 
with the signing; the diskery reports 
that Deep Purple was one of the most 
sought-after English groups to appear 
in years. Deep Purple was formed by 
John Coletta, a 35-year-old English 
advertising director, who became a 
millionaire in the advertising business, 
and reportedly invested a half million 
dollars in promoting the act abroad. 


To Record Mel Carter 

ords. Bell will distribute that label’s 
entries supervised by Mrs. Lee Apos- 
toleris. 

Uttal remarked that “the agree- 
ments we maintain with independent 
producers are based on a careful re- 
view of all material submitted to us, 
plus the active scouting that we do 
ourselves. The success of Bell Records 
is based on our ability to attract and 
satisfy the top independent producers 
— our sole source of product. The art 
of promotion and sales is our contri- 
bution to a successful record.” 

Carter Signs With Bell 

Singer Mel Carter has signed a rec- 
ording contract with Bell Records. 
The artist’s previous chart singles in- 
clude “Hold Me, Thrill Me,” “My 
Heart Sings,” “Love Is All We Need,” 
“Band Of Gold,” and “You, You, You” 
on Liberty. 

A former gospel singer with the 
Robert Anderson Singers, Carter led 
his own pop group, the Carvetts, for 
two years before beginning his suc- 
cessful solo career. He has played such 
top nightspots as the Flamingo, Ciro’s 
and the Cocoanut Grove, and major 
TV shows including Ed Sullivan, Joey 
Bishop, Merv Griffin, and Dating 
Game. 


Personal Managers 
Elect Bash Prexy 

LOS ANGELES— The Conference of 
Personal Managers has elected Sher- 
win (Bash as its new president, an- 
nounced outgoing president Bill Loeb. 
Elected with Bash were Kal Ross, 1st 
vice president; Bill Weems, 2nd vice 
president; Mimi Weber, treasurer and 
Ken Raphael, secretary. Installation 
of the officers will take place at the 
(Conference’s Annual Awards Dinner 
on June 5, at the Beverly Hills Hotel. 
Entertainer Of The Year and Man Of 
The Year presentations will also be 
made. 

Bash, partnered with Mace Neufeld 
in NRB Associates, manages Herb 
Alpert and the TJB, Don Adams, Don 
Knotts, Buck Henry, Corbett Monica 
and other personalities. 


iF you are reading 
someone else ’s copy oi 

Cash Box 

why not maii this coupon 

today i 


CASH BOX 
1780 BROADWAY ^ 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 10019 

Enclosed find my check. 

□ $25 for a full year (52 weeks) subscription (United 
States, Canada, Mexico) 

□ $45 for a full year (Airmail United States, Canada 

Mexico) 

□ $55 for a full year (Airmail other countries) 

Q $35 for a full year (Steamer mail other countries) 


(Check One) 


I AM A 

DEALER 

ONE STOP . . . 

DISTRIB 

RACK JOBBER 
PUBLISHER . . . 
RECORD CO. . 
DISK JOCKEY 
COIN FIRM .. 
OTHER 


NAME . . 
FIRM ... 
ADDRESS 


CITY STATE 


ZIP# 


Be Sure To Check Business Classification Above! 


18 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 



WeYe smock /n the 
m/dcf/e of o so//dh/t/ 


There s fantost/c o/rp/oy 
and so/es hoppen/ng 
/n Denver Seott/e, 
Ph/7ode/ph/o ond Ch/cogo/ 

Seo/yourc/ty 
w/th o k/ss. 

Smock/ 

I A PRODUCT OF 

I LI8ERTV records 




#56037 


IV LEWIS S TUE PLAYSaVS 

Produced by Snuff Garrett 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


19 




CARNEGIE BALL PREMIERE-JUNE 7 
+ THE ED SULLIVAN SHOW-JUNE 9 
+ POWERHOUSE MERCHANDISING 
FROM HERE ON IN COMBINE TO MAKE 
THE KASENETZ-KATZ SINGING ORCHESTRAL CIRCUS 
THE ALBUM OF THE YEAR ACROSS THE NATION. 8 
SUPER SELLING GROUPS...46 SINGERS 
AND MUSICIANS...JOIN TOGETHER TO 
CREATE THE FIRST ROCK SYMPHONY 
AN INCREDIBLE, SPECTACULAR EVENT 
ALREADY SEEN AND APPLAUDED BY 
MILLIONS ON NATIONWIDE TV. 




Cash Box — June 15, 











tECORDINi 


&UOOAH 


/:L 


Printed In U4X 


Lt.Garcia’s Magic Music Box/Thc Tcri Nelson Group/1989 Musical Marching Zoo 
J.C.W. Rat Finks/St.Louis Invisible Marching Band 

Simon Says (In Concert) • We Can Work It Out • You' ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelinfi • Mrs. Green • Latin ShAko • Y«><5t<»rrfAv 














Featuring 

their 

first 

hit 

single 

“DOWN 

TENNESSEE 



“ON BUDOAH RECORDS OF COURSE’ 


Outc/oor Summer Concert 
Series Set for Hamptons 

NEW YORK — ^Vacationers on the East 
End of Long Island will enjoy music 
under the stars this summer at the 
Bridgehampton Race Circuit in Bridge- 
hampton. In addition to its announced 
schedule of automobile competitions, 
The Race Circuit will be the scene of 
the first of an annual summer scries 
of live in person concerts featuring 
popular artists of the recording world. 

Presented by Bridgehampton >Music, 
which has Now York offices at 55 Jane 
Street, the concerts mil take place 
Saturday night starting July 6th and 
ending August 31st. Talent for the 
scries is being booked by College En- 
tertainment Agency. 

A stage is under construction on the 
Race Circuit’s gently sloping infield, 
and following the same successful pat- 
tern set by the Sheep Meadow Con- 
certs in New York’s Central Park, 
.‘<cating \vill be “on the ground." Tick- 
ets are priced at $2.50. 


NARAS f/ects Governors 

HOLLYWOOD — Voting members of 
NARAS, the awards association, havo 
elected fourteen new governors, and 
re-elected seven incumbents, to two- 
year terms on the Board of Govern- 
ors, according to Irv Townsend, presi- 
dent of the Los Angeles chapter. 

The newly elected governors are 
Anita Kerr, Ralph Carmichael, Jerry 
Moss, Jim Webb, Dick Bogert, Dave 
Welchman, Herb Ellis, Harry Betts, 
Leonard Feather, Woody Woodward, 
Gary Owens, Tommy Smothers, Harry 
Clehanoff and Ed Lustgarten. Those 
re-elected are Tommy Leonetti, Sid 
Feller, Johnny Mandel, Earl Palmer, 
Tommy Oliver, Bob Myers and Irv 
Townsend. 

The governors-elcct held their first 
meeting at the Century Plaza Hotel 
Wednesday (5), with an equal num- 
ber of incumbents wlio have another 
year in office. 


Kerr Moves HQ 

NEW YORK — Indie producer George 
Kerr has opened offices at 1697 Broad- 
way, to house his two production firms, 
Bay-Wes and Tra-San, and his newly 
activated publishing companies, Flot- 
eca and Bay Wes. 

Kerr, a one-time member of An- 
thony and the Imperials, was moti- 
vated to enter the production field by 
“the Motown sound," and went to De- 
troit where he met and was introduced 
to the business by Motown prexy, 
Berry Gordy, Jr. Leaving the motor 
city, he returned to New York, where 
a close friend, song^v^ite^ Gerald Har- 
ris, introduced him to Linda Jones, his 
first act. 

Among Kerr’s successes are Linda 
Jones' “Hypnotized,” “Love Explo- 
sion,” by Troy Keys and “Looking 
Over Your Shoulder” and “I’ll Be 
Sweeter Tomorrow,” both by the 
O’Jays. Currently in release is the first 
side by former Supreme Florence Bal- 
lard, “Doesn’t Matter How I Say It." 


Pete Adds Two Pubberies 

HOLLYWOOD— PeU* Records has an- 
nounced the formation of two asso- 
ciated publishing firms, according to 
Chris Petersen head of the Petersen 
Co. ASCAP compositions will go to the 
newly formed Pete Music, while BMI 
music will be handled through a divi- 
sion of the parent firm, a film and TV 
commercial producer. 


Cg^]|MK Piatier Spinner Palter 


T\yo members of the Federal Com- 
munications Commission have advo- 
cated stilFeiiing the rules on radio 
and TV license renewals. FCC com- 
missioners Kenneth A. Cox and Nich- 
olas Johnson revealed the results of 
a controversial research study in 
which they concluded the FCC should 
require broadcasters to meet mini- 
mum programing standards before 
their licenses are renewed. Furtlier- 
more, Cox and Johnson suggested the 
existing network of local broadcast- 
ing stations may not be needed. Local 
stations arc intended to preserve com- 
munity expression, they feel, hut 
broadcasters arc skimping on local 
programing while the FCC remains 
uncommitted on the issue. The full 
commission did not sanction the study. 
Its conclusions arc expected to draw 
fire from the broadcasting industry, 
which was upset when the project be- 
gan in April. However, Congressmen 
and others who believe that the FCC 
hasn't been strict enough with broad- 
casters may make increased demands 
for change. “Radio is now some 45 
years old,” says Cox. “Surely it should 
strive to be . . . something more than 
a juke box, a ball park and a news 
ticker." It seems that the "vast waste- 
land” issue has been revived, and 
once again it raises the delicate ques- 
tion of the relationship between pri- 
vate broadcasting and the govern- 
ment. 

Singer-composer-conductor Buddy 
Greco, singer Susan Barrett, and the 
Family Album, which combines mu- 
sic and satirical wit, have been set 
to appear in the third in a TV series 
of 12 “Broadcasters' Specials," each 
entitled “A Very Special Occasion.” 
Following introductory scenes in Palm 
Beach, the program will be taped in 
color at River Ranch Acres, a dude 
ranch near Orlando, Fla., by Henry 
JafFe Enterprises. Dan Lounsbery is 
producer; Walter Miller is director; 
Milton DeLugg is music director; and 
JafFe is executive producer. 

At its annual meeting on May 26, 
the American Federation of Televi- 
sion and Radio Artists (AFTRA) 
named KDKA-Pittsburgh's Ed King 
Pittsburgh’s Outstanding Radio Per- 
sonality. King is a commentator, 
writer, producer, and host of the 
nightly “Party IJne” proCTam. An- 
other honor for King was the citation 
of one of his special KDKA broad- 
casts, "What Frightens You?" as the 
outstanding radio program produced 
in Pittsburgh in 1967. Buzz Aston 
and Bill Hinds, two KDKA personal- 
ities of the 1940’s, were also honored, 
becoming the second recipients of the 
Donald B. Hirsch Memorial Award. 
The first person to receive the Hirsch 
Award was KDKA's Ed Schaughcncy, 
in 1967. Broadcast at midnight last 
Halloween, “What Frightens You?” 
demonstrates that “YOU frighten 
you!” Recently, King’s “America Fam- 
ily Album” won the Freedom Founda- 
tion Award, and bis “Scrapbook In 
Sound — April 1942" received the first 
place radio award in the Ohio State 
competition. 

WMAQ-Cliicago took second and 
third place at the Illinois Associated 
Press Radio-TV Awards Banquet on 
May 25. In the documentary cate- 
gory. WMAQ’s news special, “Death 
In The Sky,” won third place. Pro- 
duced and written by WMAQ news- 
man Harry Mantel, the program at- 
tempted to not only clinically report 
an air collision hut to analytically 
prove that the tragedy could have 
been averted through installation of 
anti-collision devices and the exclu- 
sion of small planes from general 
airports. "Death In The Sky” con- 
cerned last year’s collision of a jet- 
liner and a small private plane in 
the mountainous region of western 
North Carolina. Second place honors 


in the special events category went 
to WMAQ’s documentary, “John F. 
Kennedy: A Tribute To A Man,” 
which was first broadcast on the fourth 
anniversary of the assassination. 
The program told the story of the 
late President within the context of 
the music and legend of “Camclot” 
Walter Grisham, manager of news op- 
erations for NBC Chicago, accepted 
the awards for WMAQ. 



PICKETING PROMO MAN PUSHES 
PEOPLE: Joe Maimone, Capitol Rec- 
ords local promo man, was a one-man 
picket line recently at the WMCA- 
New York studios. He was protesting 
the outlet's not spinning Capitol's 
ri.sing chart single. “I Love You,” by 
the People. WMCA submitted to 
Maimonc's demands, as is evinced by 
deejay Joe O'Brien's gesture of sur- 
render (r.). Deejoy Ed Baer (I.) and 
music director Joe Bogart seriously 
survey Maimonc’s signs. 

SPUTTERS: WlP-Philadelphia air 
personality Tom Brown joined the cast 
of the Metropolitan Opera Company 
in its presentation of “’Tosca” on May 
30 at the Philadelphia Civic Center. 

VITAL STATISTICS: Jim Druckcr, 
originally with WINS-New York, is 
now holding down the 7 P.M. to mid- 
night slot on WSCR-Scranton, Pa. He 
will appear as a stand-in and an extra 
in the film, “The Molly McGuires," 
which stars Richard Harris, Scan 
Connery, and Samantha ^gar. . . . 
Jerry Janes, who signed WTFM-FM- 
Lake Success, N. Y., on the air when 
it began broadcasting in 1961, has re- 
sumed duties ns program director 
there. . . - Howie Newman, formerly 
a part time deejay at WPAC-Pat- 
chogue, N. Y.. and WTHE-Mi'ncola. 
N. Y., now hosts the 9 A.M. to 3 P.M. 

segment at WBAZ-Kingston, N. Y 

Joe Kelly has announced his resigna- 
tion, effective June 16, as operation 
manager and program director of 
WQXI-Atlanta . . . John Randolph has 
been named assistant program director 
of WAKY-Louisville. He cotinues as 
music director and air personality at 
the outlet. . . . Dick Summer, an air 
personality at WBZ-Boston, will han- 
dle the Monday-Sahirday 6 A.M. to 
to A.M. segment at WNEW-FM- 
New York starting on July 1. . . . 
Scotty Andrews, morning drive time 
deejay at WHIH-Norfolk, has been 
promoted to program director of the 
outlet . . . Gene Loving, who has 
been appointed promotion director at 
WGH-Newport News. Va., reports 
that I.arry O’Brien, air personality at 
the station, has been appointed music 
director. . . . KNX-FM-Los Angeles 
began midiiplioalcd stereo program- 
ming on Mav 20 under tbe direction 
of Scott O'Neil, who has been assign- 
ed the post of producer-host at the 
outlet. . . . Robert Taylor has been 
designated music director of WVNJ- 
Newark, N. J. . . - Bobby Mitchell, 
formerly afternoon drive deejay at 
WICE-Provtdence, R. I., under the air 
name of “Frank Smith,” has joined 
WRKO-Boston as a deejay. 


Bios lor 
Dee Jays 


Merrilee Rush 



Morrtleo Rush, who sings and plays 
the organ with her back up group, the 
Turnabouts, has rushed up tho charts' 
with her first Bell Records single, "An- 
gel Of The Morning,” which is number* 

9 this week. Paul Revere and tho 
Raiders arc Merrilee and tho Tum- 
nhouts’ personal managers. Morrilco 
studied classical piano for ton ycarR.y 
and she now writes songs when timo 
permits. She enjoys horseback riding 
and loves animals, and her menagerie* ^ 
includes an Old English Sheepdog, 
three cats, an articulate Mynah bin!, 
and a parrot named Barney. The Turn- 
abouts are Danny, drums; Terry, bass; 
Carl, ^itar; and Neil, sax. Danny in- 
vests his time and money in replacing y 
broken drum equipment and playing 
pool. Terry has a passion for 8:^orts 
cars and plans to buy his own helicop- * 
ter. Carl, who sings in addition to play- , 
ing the guitar, sang in the Babtist 
Church choir when he was a youngster 
in Miami, Oklahoma. Neil, the founder 
and leader of the Turnabouts, is quite 
business-oriented. He is the proud 
owner of a 260cc Bultaco motorcycle. 
Merrileo and tho Turnabouts have , 
mado numerous TV appearances, and a 
running part in a TV series for Mor- 
rilee is being put together. ^ 


I 


Joni Mitchell 



Joni Mitchell was born on Novcm- . 
jer 7, 1943, in McLeod, Alberta, Can- 
ida. She attended public schools in 
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and, intend-'' 
ng to become a commercial artist, sho 
•nrolled in the Alberta College of Art 
n Calgary. After mastering some 
jkelelc chords and a few traditional 
tallads, she got her first job in a cofTce- 
louse called the Depression. Joni dis- .. 
'overed she enjoyed singing more than . 
jainting, and travelled to the Mariposa | 
?olk Festival in Ontario, a three-day** 
rip east on the Canadian Pacific. On ^ 
he way sho wrote her first song, a 
dues ^ne called “Day After Day, 
vhich was timed to the clacking of the ^ 
■ailroad wheels on steel rails. Slie has 
low written over €0 songs. Joni has ^ 
vorked in Toronto coffeehouses and 
letroit clubs. When she came to New 
fork, she was discovered and signed ■* * 
.y Andy Wickham of Reprise Records. ^ 


26 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 




KASENETZ-KATZ SINGING ORCHESTRAL CIRCUS * AN ORIGINAL CAST RECORDING 

BDS-5020 



INCLUDED IN EVERY ALBUM— INDIVIDUAL STAMP SHEETS 
OF THE GREATEST CONGLOMERATION OF MUSICAL TALENT 
SINCE BACH GAVE WAY TO ROCK!!! 



RECORDS 


“ON BUDDAH RECORDS OF COURSE” 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


27 









BMI Certificates For 1967 Performances Well Done 



Eecording stars and publishing 
figures basked in a warm glow of 
satisfaction as they received their spe- 
cial awards from BMI in the recent 
celebration held at the Hotel Pierre 
in New York. The annual banquet’s 
writer-publisher awards, based on a 


new logging standard, were delivered 
before an audience of some 400 win- 
ners and guests. Among the winners 
shown receiving, displaying or dis- 
cussing the citations are : Berry 
Gordy, Jr. and Diana Ross of the Su- 
premes receiving Jobete’s prize (one 


of eight) from Theodora Zavin, vp in 
charge of writer & publisher adminis- 
tration for BMI; Herbert Rehbein, 
Hal Fein of Roosevelt Music, Bert 
Kaempfert, and Charles Singleton 
representing the publisher and song- 
writing teams that took six certifi- 


cates ; Robert Casper, Mr. & Mrs. 
Lenny Hodes representing Maclen, the 
Beatles’ publisher which won four 
awards; and Mrs. Zavin giving Satur- 
day’s Larry Weiss and Bob Crewe a 
certificate with BMI president Ed- 
ward Kramer looking on at left. 



Photos from the left show Phil 
Walden and Mrs. Otis Redding receiv- 
ing an award from BMI’s president 
Edward Kramer; Kramer and Mrs. 


Zavin awarding a certificate to John 
D. Loudermilk and Wesley Rose; a 
gathering of Justin Bradshaw, BMI’s 
vp in charge of broadcaster relations. 


MPA’s executive secretary Leonard 
Feist, Leon Brettler of Painted Desert 
Music and Tree head Jack Stapp; and 
Atlantic Records’ Jerry Wexler with 


Picturetone Music’s Phil Kahl, King 
Curtis who provided the music for the 
evening’s festivities, and BMI veep 
Russ Sanjek. 



Happy Goday at left picks up a spe- 
cial citation for Unart Music’s “You 
Only Live Twice” by John Barry & 
Leslie Bricusse. Also at the podium 
are U.A.’s Murray Deutch talking to 


Edward Kramer (with back to cam- 
era) ; Mr. & Mrs. Charlie Koppleman 
and Mr. & Mrs. Don Rubin with 
awards are fianked by Kramer and 
former BMI head Bob Sour; the 


presentation team of Kramer and 
Zavin go to work again with A1 Gal- 
lico, and his publishing house’s team 
Glen Sutton and Billy Sherrill; and 


Neil Diamond (right), winner of 
three awards, confers with Bill 
Downer of Champion Music and Sal 
Chiantia (center) of MCA. 


LELAN ROGERS 
IS ALIYE AND WELL 

IN HOUSTON 

GHILDREM 


Mills Music Adds Four New Staffers 


NEW YORK— Mills Music has ap- 
pointed four new members to its staff, 
it has been announced by Alan L. 
Shulman, vice president of the firm. 

Kevin Norris has joined the educa- 
tional department, with responsibility 
to contribute to the promotion of 
Mills’ extensive catalog of educational 
publications (scores, textbooks, and 
other teaching aids). Norris, an hon- 
ors graduate of the American Conser- 
vatory, is an active, published com- 
poser and also had five years’ experi- 
ence as a teacher of music theory. 

Gary R. Meyers has been appointed 
production manager of printed prod- 
uct. In this capacity he is responsible 
for the production of all of Mills’ 
printed materials. Meyers has been a 
free-lance consultant in graphic arts, 
and for the past four years he was art 


director and production manager of 
Argyle Publishing Corp. 

Harvey L. Snyder has been ap- 
pointed advertising manager, respon- 
sible for advertising, public relations 
and sales promotion of Mills’ catalog 
of popular and serious music and edu- 
cational materials. Snyder previously 
"erved in a similar capacity in Mer- 
cury Records’ classical division, was 
executive editor of Columbia Record 
Club publications, and public relations 
assistant for the League of New York 
Theatres. He holds a music degree 
from Columbia College. 

Amanda Schuster, formerly with 
^iTercury and Decca Records, has also 
joined Mills as assistant to Snyder, 
Meyers and Norris. All of the above 
appointees report to Robert Silveimian, 
director of publications. 


28 


Ccsh Box — June 15, 1968 






. r 



Marilyn Maye 

Montage from How Sweet It Is 

her new Victor single ^9560 

Mr. Jim Webb 


hottest song writer in the country 
(Up, Up and Away, By the Time I Get 
to Phoenix, McArthur Park), hot enough? 

Monster 

a modest description of what this will be 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


90 




























TOSCANINI 

Mendekseho SYMPHONY No. 4 (“OAIiAU") 
W*W OVERTURES: DER FREiSCttUTZ 
EURYANTHE-08ER0N 
MBC STMPHOKf (»CH€Sm 


Handel 

The Six Organ Concertos 

Of.r 

CarlWeinrich 

The Arthur Fiedler Sinfoniettax^ 

ICuArthur Fiedler KiyrrcK 

. 9- '**WM < _ Nrv &kAI. 

k t CoJteloefvr ewottM 




TOSCANINI 

ELGAR: Enigma Yamlios» 
RESPIGHI: Feste Rimutne 

NBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Sjm^hoBy No. 6 

(OM ll«. I) 
Sltv««cB»»es 
Nbs. 2 irfS 


CaajacW 


liemtOA 


The Art of 

1 AWRENCE TOBETT 


-Barlton* 


DOWLAND v-t- 

“Lachrimae or SeavenTeares^’ 
and Fonr^oea Other Dances 
Eitgeae Malier-Dombott, Lato 
Vida & gamba Qittatet 




VIC/VlCS-1341 (e) 


CAL/CAS-2238 


LM/LSC-7052 


VIC/VICS-1344 (e) 


BEETHOVEN: The Five Middle Quarters 

Opus 59, Nos, 1-3 (Rasumovsky) ♦ , 

Opu.s 74 (Harp) * Opus 95 i , Vk w 

THE GUARNERI QUARTET S 

Steinhaidl Daliey Soyer-Cdio Tice 
ls( Violin iind Vioim . , Viola 


CAL/CAS-2239 


UM/LSC-3016 


VCM/VCS*6415 


VIC/VlCS-1340 (e) 


C. RE. BACH v@ 

Double Concerto in F for “ 

Two Harpsichords and Orch, 

Concerto in B-Flat for Cello and Orcb. 

CtKfav Leonhardt and Alan Curfc, Harpsichord 
Angelica May, Cefio 
COLLEGIUM AUREUM 


Rimsky- Korsakoff; 
Symphony No. 2 ("Antar") 


Miaskovsky: Symphony No. 21 







ill 






















mai Siatisiics 


A 


DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT TITLES ON THE CASH BOX TOP 100 THIS WEEK 


* New To The Top 100 
#1 

MRS. ROBINSON (4:00) 

Simon & Garfunkel-Columbia 44511 
51 West 52 Street, NYC. 

PROD; Simon-Garfunkei c/o Mort Lewis 
75 East 55 Street, NYC. 

Halee c/o Columbia 

PUB: Charing Cross BMI 40 E. 54 St. NYC. 
WRITER: P. Simon FLIP: Old Friends/Bookends 

#2 

THIS GUY’S IN LOVE WITH YOU (3:55) 

Herb Alpert-A&M 929 

1416 La Brea, Hollywood, Calif. 

PROD: Herb Alpert & Jerry Moss c/o A&M 
PUB: Blue Seas ASCAP & Jac ASCAP 
c/o Fred E. Ahlert 15 E. 48 St., NYC. 

WRITERS: David-Bacharach ARR: Bacharach 
FLIP: A Quiet Tear 

#3 

MAC ARTHUR PARK (7:20) 

Richard Harris-Dunhill 4134 
1330 Ave. Of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD: Canopy 9255 Sunset Blvd., L.A., Cal. 

PUB: Canopy ASCAP (same address) 

WRITER: Jimmy Webb ARR: Jimmy Webb 
FLIP: Didn’t We 

#4 

MONY MONY (2:45) 

Tommy James & The Shondells-Roulette 7008 
1631 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Kasenetz-Katz 200 W. 57 St., NYC. 

PUB: Patricia BMI 1631 Bway, NYC. 

WRITERS: B. Bloom-R. Cordell-B. Gentry-T. James 
FLIP: One Two Three And I Fell 

#5 

YUMMY YUMMY YUMMY (2:18) 

Ohio Express-Buddah 38 
1650 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Kasenetz-Katz 200 W. 57 St., NYC. 

PUB: TM BMI 1619 Bway, NYC. 

WRITERS: A. Resnick-J. Levine 
ARR: Jimmy Calvert FLIP: "Zig Zag" 

#6 

TIGHTEN UP (2:38) 

Archie Bell-Atlantic 2478 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Al. J. F. Prod. 

PUB; Cotillion BMI 1841 Bway, NYC. 

Orellia BMI 4406 Reed Rd., Houston, Texas 
WRITERS; Billy Buttier-Archie Bell 
FLIP: Dog Eat Dog 


YOUR TIME HASN'T COME YET, BABY 

ELVIS PRESLEY RCA 

Elvis Presley Music, Inc. 

LET YOURSELF GO 

ELVIS PRESLEY RCA 

Elvis Presley Music, Inc. 

SUMMERTIME BLUES 

BLUE CHEER Philips 

Rumbalero Music, Inc. 
Elvis Presley Music, Inc. 

WONDER BOY 

KINKS REPRISE 

Noma Music, Inc. 
HiCount Music 

LOVE IS KIND 

SEEKERS CAPITOL 

Noma Music, Inc. 
Jumito Music 

SKY PILOT 

ERIC BURDON & ANIMALS MGM 

Slamina Music, Inc. 
Sea Lark Music 

GONE 

TIMOTHY CARR HOT BISCUIT 

Hill & Range Songs, Inc. 

Dallas 

CRYING IN THE CHAPEL 

STAPLE SINGERS EPIC 

Valley Publishers, Inc. 

RUBY BABY - 

MITCH RIDER DYNOVOICE 

Tiger Music, Inc. 

PLEASE STAY 

DAVE CLARK FIVE EPIC 

Anne-Rachel Music, Inc. 

U. S. Songs 
Walden 
Blue Seas 

NIGHT OWL 

HOWARD TATE VERVE 

Rumbalero Music, Inc. 
Ragmar Music, Inc. 

THE BED 

WALTER JACKSON EPIC 

EDDIE RABBITT DATE 

KARON RONDELL COLUMBIA 

Noma Music, Inc. 
S-P-R Music, Corn. 

THINK ABOUT IT 

YARDBYRDS EPIC 

Noma Music, Inc. 
Inquiry Music, Inc. 

TWEEDLE DEE DEE 

WILLIE BOBO VERVE 

Progressive Music Pub. Co., Inc. 

OH WHAT IT SEEMED TO BE 

JIMMY ROSELLI U.A. 

Anne-Rachel Music 

DO I LOVE YOU 

MAGIC RING MUSIC FAaORY 

Hill & Range Songs, Inc. 
Mother Bertha Music, Inc. 

I'M BLUE 

SWEET INSPIRATIONS ATLANTIC 

Progressive Music Pub. Co. Inc. 

Placid Music, Inc. 

I DON'T WANT TO SET 
THE WORLD ON FIRE 

FRANKIE LAINE ABC 

Bennie Benjamin Music, Inc. 

THE ABERBACH GROUP 
241 West 72 Street, New York, N. Y. 


#7 

THINK (2:15) Aretha Franklin-Atlantic 2518 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Jerry Wexler c/o Atlantic 

PUB: Fourteenth Hour BMI c/o Ted White 

1721 Field, Detroit, Michigan. 

WRITERS: A. Franklin-T, White 
FLIP: You Send Me 


#8 

ANGEL OF THE MORNING (2:58) 

Merrilee Rush-Bell 705 
1776 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Tommy Cogbill & Chips Moman 
827 Thomas St., Memphis, Tenn. 

PUD: Blackwood BMI 1650 Bway, NYC. 
WRITER: Chip Taylor 
FLIP: Reap What You Sow 

#1 

THE GOOD, THE BAD, THE UGLY (2:43) 
Hugo Montenegro-RCA 9423 
155 East 24 Street, NYC 
PROD: Neely Plumb c/o RCA 
PUB: Unart DM I c/o United Artists 
729 7th Ave., NYC. 

WRITER: Morricone ARR: H. Montenegro 
FLIP; March With Hope 


#10 

A BEAUTIFUL MORNING (2:32) 

The Rascals-Atlantic 2493 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: The Rascals c/o Slacsar 
PUB: Slacsar BMI 444 Madison Ave., NYC. 
WRITERS: F. Cavaliere-E. Drigati 
ARR: Arif Mardin FLIP: Rainy Day 

#11 

MASTER JACK (2:50) 

Four Jacks & A Jill-RCA 9473 
155 East 24 Street, NYC. 

PUB; Milene ASCAP 

2510 Franklin Road, Nashville, Tenn. 

WRITER; Marks FLIP; I Looked Back 


#12 

I COULD NEVER LOVE ANOTHER (3:19) 

Temptations-Gordy 7072 

2457 Woodward Ave^ Detroit, Mich. 

PROD: Norman Whitfield c/o Gordy 
PUB; Jobete BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: Whitfield-Strong-Penzabene 
FLIP: Gonna Give Her All The Love I’ve Got 


#13 

REACH OUT OF THE DARKNESS (2:59) 

Friend And Lover-Verve/Forecast 5069 
1350 Ave. of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD: Joe South & Bill Lowery 
P.O. Box 9687 Atlanta, Georgia. 

PUD: Lowery BMI (same address) 

WRITER: Post FLIP: Time On Your Side 

#14 

LIKE TO GET TO KNOW YOU (3:06) 

Spanky & Our Gang-Mercury 72799 
34 E. Wacker Drive, Chicago, III. 

PROD; Bob Dorough 28-12 41 Ave., L.I.C., N.Y. 

Stuart Scharf c/o Bob Dorough 

PUB: Takya ASCAP 190 Waverly Place, NYC. 

WRITER: S. Scharf 

FLIP: Three Ways From Tomorrow 

#19 

THE HORSE (2:25) 

Cliff Nobles & Co.-Phil L.A. of Soul 313 
919 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

PROD: Jesse James c/o Jamie Guyden 
(same address) 

PUB; Dandelion BMI (same address) 

James Boy BMI Norristown, Pa. 

WRITER: J. James ARR: Bobby Martin 
FLIP: Love Is AH Right 

#18 

LOOK OF LOVE (3:03) 

Sergio Mendes & Brasil ’ 66 -A 81 M 924 
1416 La Brea, LA., Calif. 

PROD: Herb Alpert c/o A&M 

PUB: Colgems ASCAP 

7033 Sunset Blvd., H’wood, Calif. 

WRITERS: D. Bachrach-H. David 
ARR: Dave Grusin FLIP: Like A Lover 

#17 

AIN’T NOTHING LIKE THE REAL THING (2:14) 

Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell-Tamla 54163 
2457 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. 

PROD: Ashford-Simpson c/o Tamla 
PUB; Jobete BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: Ashford-Simpson 
FLIP: Little Ole Boy, Little Ole Girl 

#18 

A MAN WITHOUT LOVE (3:20) 

Engelbert Humperdinck-Parrot 40027 
539 West 25 Street, NYC. 

PROD: Peter Sullivan 
Decca House, London, England. 

PUB: Leeds ASCAP c/o MCA 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

WRITERS: Panzeri-Pace-Livraghi-Mason 
FLIP: Call on Me 

#19 

I LOVE YOU (4:37) People-Capitol 2078 
1750 N. Vine, H’wood, Calif. 

PROD: MIkel Hunter, c/o Capitol 
PUB: Mainstay BMI 101 W. 55 St., NYC. 

WRITER: Chris White 

FLIP: Somebody Tell Me My Name 

#20 

CHOO CHOO TRAIN (2:46) Box Tops-Mala 12005 
1776 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Dan Penn, 827 Thomas St, Memphis, Tenn. 
PUB: Ruler BMI P.O. Box 2025, Florence, Ala. 

Mulj BMI c/o David Briggs 
Asby Dr., Franklin, Tenn. 

WRITERS: Fritts-Hinton FLIP: Fields of Clover 


#21 

LICKING STICK-LICKING STICK (Part 1) (2:50) 

James Brown-King 6166 

1540 Drewster Ave., Cinn., Ohio. 

PROD: James Brown 850 7th Ave., NYC. 

PUB: Toccoa BMI 1501 Bway, NYC. 

Lois BMI 1540 Brewster Ave., Cinn., Ohio. 
WRITERS; J. Brown-A. Ellis-D. Byrd 
FLIP; Licking Stick-Licking Stick (Part 2) 

#22 

HOW’D WE EVER GET THIS WAY (2:29) 

Andy Kim-Steed 707 

c/o Jeff Barry 300 E. 74 St., NYC. 

PROD: Jeff Barry (same address) 

PUB: Unart BMI 799 7th Ave., NYC. 

WRITERS: J. Barry-A. Kim 

ARR: Dean Christofer 

FLIP: Are You Ever Coming Home 

#23 

TIME FOR LIVIN’ (2:43) 

Association-Warner Bros. 7195 
4000 Warner Dlvd., Burbank, Calif. 

PROD: Bones Howe c/o Binder/Howe 
8833 Sunset Blvd. Suite 410, L.A., Cal. 

PUB: Tamerlane BMI 
6290 Sunset Blvd., L.A. Calif. 

WRITERS; Dick & Don Addrisi 
FLIP; Birthday Morning 

#24 

TIP TOE THRU THE TULIPS (1:48) 

Tiny Tim-Reprise 0679 

4000 Warner Blvd., Burbank, Calif. 

PROD: Richard Perry c/o Reprise 

PUD: Witmark ASCAP 488 Madison Av., NYC. 

WRITERS: Dubin-Burk FLIP: Fill Your Heart 

#25 

UNITED (2:47) Peaches & Herb-Date 1603 
51 West 52nd Street, NYC. 

PROD: Gamble-Huff 250 S. Broad St, Phila., Pa. 
PUB: Razor Sharp BMI c/o Kenneth Gamble 
5412 Osage Ave., Phila., Pa. 

WRITERS: Gamble-Huff 

ARR: Richard Rome FLIP: Thank You 

#26 

DELILAH (3:20) Tom Jones-Parrot 40029 
539 West 25 Street, NYC. 

PROD; Peter Sullivan c/o Decca House, London, Eng. 
PUB: Donna BMI 101 West 55 Street NYC. 
WRITERS: Les Reed-Barry Mason 
ARR: Les Reed FLIP: Smile 

#27 

NEVER GIVE YOU UP (2:56) 

Jerry Butler-Mercury 72798 
35 E. Wacker Drive, Chicago, III. 

PROD: Gamble Huff 

250 S. Broad St, Phila, Pa. 

PUB: Parabut BMI c/o Ensign 
1501 Broadway, NYC. 

WRITERS; Gamble-Huff-Butler 
ARR; Bobby Martin FLIP: Beside You 

#28 

JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH (2:42) 

Rolling Stones-London 908 
539 West 25th Street NYC. 

PROD: Jimmy Milier c/o Island Records 
155 Oxford St London Wl, England. 

PUB: Gideon BMI c/o Allen Klein 
Warwick Hotel, NYC. 

WRITERS: Mick Jaegger-Keith Richards 
FLIP: Child Of The Moon 

#29 

INDIAN LAKE (2:40) Cowsills-MGM 13944 
1350 Ave. of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD; Wes Farrell, 39 W. 55 St, NYC. 

PUB; Pocket Full of Tunes BMI 
39 W. 55 St., NYC. 

WRITER: Romeo ARR: Tony Romeo 
FLIP: Newspaper Blanket 

#30 

JELLY JUNGLE (2:12) 

Lemon Pipers-Buddah 41 

1650 Dway, NYC. 

PROD: Paul Leka c/o Kama Sutra (same address) 

PUB: Kama Sutra BMI (same address) 

WRITERS; P. Leka-S. Pinz 

ARR: P. Leka FLIP: Shoe Shine Boy 

#31 

LOVE IS ALL AROUND (2:57) Troggs-Smash 1607 
35 East Wacker Drive. Chicago, III. 

PROD- Page One. London, England. 

PUD Dick lames BMI 1780 Bway. NYC. 

WRITER- R. Presley FLIP: When Will The Rain Come 

#32 

HONEY (3:58) 

Bobby Goldsboro-United Artists 50283 
729 Seventh Ave.. NYC. 

PROD Dob Montgomery & Bobby Goldsboro 
S06 17th Ave. S.. Nashville, Tenn. 

PUB: Russell-Cason ASCAP 

312 17th Ave. S.. Nashville. Tenn. 

WRITER; B. Russell ARR; Don Tweedy 
FLIP: Danny 


#35 

MY GIRL HEY GIRL (2:33) 

Bobby Vee-Liberty 56033 
6290 Sunset Blvd., H'wood, Calif. 

PROD: Dallas Smith c/o Liberty 
PUB: (May Girl) Jobete BMI 
2457 Woodward Ave., Det. Mich. 

(Hey Girl) Screen Gems/Columbia DMi 
711 5th Ave., NYC. 

WRITERS: (My Girl) Wm. Roblnson-Ronald White’ 
(Hey Girl) Jerry Goffin-Carole King 
ARR; Lincoln Mayorga 

FLIP: Just Keep It Up And See What Happens 
#36 

SHOO-BE-DOO-BE-DOO-DA-DAY (2:44) 

Stevie Wonder-Tamla 54165 
2457 Woodward Ave., Detroit Mich. 

PROD: H. Cosby c/o Tamla 
PUB: Jobete BMI (same address) 

WRITERS; Cosby-Moy-Wonder 

FLIP: Why Don’t You Lead Me To Love 


#37 

LADY WILL POWER (2:38) 

Gary Puckett & Union Gap-Columbia 44547 
51 West 52nd Street NYC. 

PROD: Jerry Fuller c/o Columbia 
PUD: Viva BMI 

1800 N. Argyle Suite 200, H’wood, Calif. 
WRITER: J. Fuller ARR: Al Capps 
FLIP: Daylight Stranger 


#38 

I WANNA LIVE (2:42) 

Glen Campbell-Capitol 2146 
1750 N. Vine, Hollywood, Calif. 
PROD: Al De Lory c/o Capitol 
PUB; Wind Ward Side BMI 
Old Hickory Blvd., Drentwood, Calif. 
WRITER: John D. Laudermilk 
ARR: Al De Lory 
FLIP: That’s All That Matters 


#39 

SOME THINGS YOU NEVER GET USED TO (2:23) 

Diana Ross & The Supremes-Motown 1126 

2457 Woodward Ave., Detroit Mich. 

PROD: Ashford & Simpson c/o Motown 
PUB; Jobete BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: N. Ashford-V. Simpson 
FLIP: You’ve Been So Wonderful To Me 

#40 

STONED SOUL PICNIC (3:23) 

5th Dimension-Soul City 766 
6920 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 

PROD: Bones Howe c/o Dinder/Howe 
8833 Sunset Blvd. Suite 410, L.A., Cal. 

PUB: Tuna Fish BMI 

c/o Darovick Koneck & Bomser 555 Mad. Ave., NYC. 

WRITER: Laura Nyro 

ARR; R. Pohiman-B. Alcivar-B. Holman 

FLIP; The Sailboat Song 

#41 

DO YOU KNOW THE WAY TO SAN JOSE (2:50) 
Dionne Warwick-Scepter 12216 
254 West 54 Street, NYC. 

PROD: Bacharach-David 

c/o Fred Ahlert Jr., 15 E. 48 St, NYC, 

PUB; Jac ASCAP & Blue Seas ASCAP 
(same address) 

WRITERS: Bacharach-David 

ARR; Burt Dacharach FLIP: Let Me Be Lonely 

#42 

TESTER LOVE (2:16) 

Smokey Robinson & Miracles-Tamla 54167 
2457 Woodward Ave. Detroit Michigan. 

PROD; Smokey c/o Tamla 
PUB; Jobete BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: Robinson-Cleveland 
F_^P: Much Better Off 

#43 

IF YOU DON’T WANT MY LOVE (2:29) 

Robert John-Columbia 44435 
51 West 52 Street, NYC. 

PROD: David Rubinson c/o Columbia 
PUB: Bornwin BMI 300 W. 55 St, NYC 
WRITERS; M. Gately-R. Pedrick-L. David 
ARR: Charlie Calello FLIP: Don’t 

#44 

YOU DON’T KNOW WHAT YOU MEAN TO ME (2:30) 
Sam & Dave-Atlantic 2517 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Isaac Hayes & David Porter c/o Stax 
926 E. McLemore, Memphis, Tenn. 

PUD: East BMI, 926 E. McLemore, Memphis, Tenn. 
Cotillion BMI, 1841 Bway, NYC. 

WRITERS: Eddie Floyd-Steve Cropper 
FLIP; This Is Your World 

#45 

I’LL NEVER DO YOU WRONG (3:03) 

Joe Tex-Dial 4076 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Buddy Killen c/o Dial 

PUB: Tree BMI 905 16 Av S., Nashville, Tenn. 

WRITER: Joe Tex FLIP: Wooden Spoon 


■i 


4 






•f 

I 


1 


4 

a 


1 


V 


#33 

SHE’S A HEART BREAKER (2:59) 

Gene Pitney-Musicor 1306 
240 W. 55 St, NYC. 

PROD; Charlie Foxx c/o Musicor 
PUB; Catalogue BMI 240 W. 55 St., NYC. 

Cee & Eye BMI 

c/o Ginsberg & Hack 608 5th Ave., NYC. 

WRITERS; Charlie Foxx-Jerry Williams 
ARR: Teacho Wilchire-C. Foxx 
FLIP: Conauistador 

#34 

COWBOYS TO GIRLS (2:37) Intruders-Gamble 214 

1650 Broadway. NYC. 

PROD: Gamble-Huff c/o Razor Sharp 

PUB; Razor Sharp BMI 250 S. Broad St.. Phila, Pa. 

WRITERS; K. Gamble-L Huff 

ARR: Bobby Martin FLIP; Turn The Hands Of Time 


#48 

HERE COMES THE JUDGE (2:33) 

Shorty Long-Soul 35044 

2457 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

PROD: Shorty Long & B.J. c/o Soul 
PUB: Jobete BMI (same address) 1 

WRITERS: Brown-de Passe-Long I 

FLIP: Sing What You Wanna 

#47* 

D. W. WASHBURN (2:46) 

The Monkees-Colgems 1023 
711 Fifth Ave., NYC. 

PROD: The Monkees c/o Colgems 

PUB: Columbia/Screen Gems BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: Leiber-Stoller 

ARR; Shorty Rogers 

FLIP: It’s Nice To Be With You 


32 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 





l/ifol Siatisiics 


I 

Jt 

DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT TITLES ON THE CASH BOX TOP 100 THIS WEEK 


* New To The Top 100 

#48 

IF I WERE A CARPENTER (2:45) 

4 Tops-Motown 1124 

2457 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

PROD: Holland & Dozier e/o Motown 
PUB: Robbins ASCAP 1350 6th Are., NYC. 
WRITER: Hardin aiP: Wonderful Baby 

#48 

SAFE IN MY GARDEN (3:10) 

Mamas & Papas-Dunhill 4125 

449 So. Beverly Dr., Bev. Hills, Calif. 

PROD: Lou Adler 

PUB: Wingate ASCAP & Honest John ASCAP 
449 So. Beverly Dr., Bev. Hills, Calif. 

8833 Sunset Blvd. 

WRITER: John Phillips 
FLIP: Too Late 

#50 

I WILL ALWAYS THINK ABOUT YOU (2:22) 
New Colony Six-Mercury 72775 
35 East Wacker Drive, Chicago, III. 

PROD: Sentar Records 

1448 S. Michigan Aye.. Chicago. III. 

PUB: New Colony BM1 c/o Sentar 
WRITERS: R. RIca-L. Kummel 
aiP: Hold Mo With Your Eyes 


#51 

(YOU KEEP ME) HANGIN' ON (2:45) 

Joe Simon-Sound Stage 7 — ^2608 
530 W. Main, Hendersonville, Tenn. 

PROD: J. R. Enterprises 

2127 Chickering Rd., Nashville, Tenn. 

PUB: Garpax BMI P.O. Box 669, H’wood, Calif. 
Alanbo BMI P.O. Bx 6024 Nashville, Tenn. 
WRITERS: B. MIze-l. Allen 
ARR: Chips Moman aiP: Long Hot Summer 


#52 

SKY PILOT (Part 1] (2:55) 

Eric Burdon & Animals-MGM 4537 
1350 Ave. of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD: Tom Wilson 361 Waverly Av., Bklyn, NY. 
PUB: Slamina BMI 241 W. 72 St, NYC. 

Sealark BMI 25 W. 56 St, NYC. 

WRITERS: Burdon-Briggs-Weider-Jenkins-McCulloch 
ARR: Vic Briggs FLIP: Sky Pilot (Complete Version) 


#53 

THE UNICORN (3:18) 

The Irish Rovars-Decea 82254 
445 Park Ave., NYC. 

PROD: Charles Bud Dant c/o Dacca 
PUB: Hollis BMI 10 Columbus Circle. NYC 
WRITER: Shel Sllverstein 
FLIP: Black Velvet Band 


#54 

SHE'S LOOKING GOOD (2i15l 
Wilson Pickett-AUantie 2504 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Tom Dowd & Tommy Cogblll c/o Atlantic 
PUB: Veytig BMI 855 Treat Av. San Francisco, C<>l. 
WRITER: Roger Collins FLIP: We’ve Got To Have Lo\ e 


#55 

HERE I AM BABY (2:46) 

Marvelettes-Tamia 54166 

2457 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

PROD: Smokey c/o Tamla 

PUB: Jobete BMI (same address) 

WRITER: William Robinson 

FLIP: Keep Off — No Trespassing 


#56 

BRING A LimE LOVIN’ (2:23) 

Los Bravos-Parrot 3020 
539 W. 25 St. NYC. 

PROD: Alain M’ilhaud LIbertad 24, Madrid 4 Spain 
PUB: Miller ASCAP 1350 Ave. of the Americas, NYC. 
WRITERS: Harry Vanda-George Young 
ARR: Jean Bouchety FLIP: Make It Last 


#57 

IT SHOULD HAVE BEEN ME (2:59) 
Gladys Knight & The Pips-Soul 35045 
2457 Woodward Ave., Detroit Mich. 
PROD: N. Whitfield c/o Soul 
PUB: Jobete BMI (same address) 
WRITERS: Whitfield-Stevenson 
FLIP: You Don't Love Me No More 


#58' 

TAKE TIME TO KNOW HER (2:55) 

Percy SIfedge-Atlantie 2490 
1841 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Quinn Ivy & Marlin Greene 
102 E. 2nd St, Sheffield, Ala. 

PUB: Al Galileo BMI 101 W 55 St., NYC. 

WRITER: Steve Davis 

ELIP: It’s All Wrong But It's Alright 


HEADQUARTERS OF 
OUTSTANOrNG MUSIC PUBLISHERS 

1650 

BROADWAY 

A Few Fine Offices Available Oct. 1 


Agent on Premises 

The DILLIARD Corp. 

PLaza 7-4400 


#59 

BACK IN LOVE AGAIN (2:21) 
Buckinghams-Columbia 44533 
51 West 52 St, NYC. 

PROD: Jimmy Wisner c/o Columbia 
PUB: BuckIng-EI BMI c/o Joel Carlins 
7 S. Dearborn, Chicago, III. 

WRITER: N. Grebb ARR: Andrews-Grebb 
FLIP: You Misunderstand Me 

#50 

GRAZING IN THE GRASS (2:25) 

Hugh Masekela-UNI 55066 
8255 Sunset Blvd., L.A., Calif. 

PROD: Stewart Levine c/o Chisa 
PUB: Chisa BMi 

1601 Queens Rd., Hoilywood, Calif. 

WRITER: P. Hou 

FLIP: Bajabula Bonke (The Healing Song) 

#61 

SOUL SERENADE (2:15) 

Willie Mitchell-Hi 2140 
539 West 25 Street NYC. 

PROD: Willie Mitchell 
306 Poplar, Memphis, Tenn. 

PUB: Kilynn BMI, 392 Central Park W., NYC. 
WRITERS: Ousley-Dixon 
FLIP: Mercy. Mercy, Mercy 

#62 

SLEEPY JOE (2:40) 

Herman's Hermits-MGM 13934 
1350 Ave. of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD: Mickie Most 101 Dean St, London, Eng. 
PUB: Hermits BMI 444 Madison Ave., NYC. 
WRITER Carter FLIP: Just One Girl 

#63 

HERE COMES THE JUDGE (2:45) 

The Magistrates-MGM 13946 
1350 Ave. of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD: Gross-Freda 

408 Tanforan Rd., Cherry Hiil, N.J. 

PUB: Hastings Music BMI 
1350 Ave., of the Americas, NYC. 

Sreeby BMI c/o Gross-Freda 
WRITERS: J. Gross-M. Freda 
ARR: Gross-Freda FLIP: Girl 

#64 

UNWIND (3:10) Ray Stevens-Monument 1048 
530 W. Main St, Hendersonville, Tenn. 

PROD: Ray Stevens & Fred Foster c/o Monument 
PUB; Ahab BMI 114 Lincoln Ct, Nashville, Tenn. 
WRITERS: R. Stevens ARR: R. sevens 
FLIP; For He's A Jelly Good Fellow 

#65 

LOVE IN EVERY ROOM (2:30) 

Paul Mauriat-Philips 40530 
35 E. Wacker Drive, Chicago, ill. 

PUB: Northern ASCAP c/o MCA 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

WRITERS: J. Chaumelle-B. Kesslair-C. Francolf 
FLIP: The English Nightingale 

#66 

APOLOGIZE (2:02) Ed Ames-RCA 9517 
155 East 24 Street NYC. 

PROD: Jim Fogelsong c/o RCA 
PUB: Stone Canyon BMI 
1800 N. Argyle St, L.A. Calif. 

WRITERS: ^rdon-Grlffin 
ARR: Perry Botkin. Jr. 

FLIP: The Wind will Change Tomorrow 
(Cuando Sail De Cuba) 

#67 

DOES YOUR MAMA KNOW ABOUT ME (2dn) 
Bobby Taylor & The Vancouvers-Gerdy 7069 
2457 Woodward Ave., Detroit Mich. 

PROD: B. Gordy Jr. c/o Gordy 

PUB: Stein-Van Stock ASCAP (same address) 

WRITERS: Baird-Chong FLIP: Fading Away 

#68 

BROOKLYN ROADS (3:26) 

Neil Diamond-UNI 55065 
8255 Sunset Blvd., L.A., Calif. 

PROD: Chip Taylor 

c/o April Blackwood 1650 Bway, NYC. 

ftiB: stonebridge BMI 

c/o Fred Weintraub 211 E. 57 St., NYC. 

WRITER; Neil Diamond 

ArR: Artie Schroek FLIP: Holiday Inn Blues 

#69* 

PEOPLE SURE ACT FUNNY (2:10) 

Arthur Conley-Atco 6586 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD; Tom Dowd c/o Atco 
PUB; Bob-Dan BMI 29 W. 125 St., NYC. 
WRITERS: Titus Turner-James McDougal 
FLIP: Burning Fire 

#70 

PICTURES OF MATCH STICK MEN (2:59) 

The Status Guo-Cadet Concept 7001 
320 E. 21 Street Chicago, III. 

PROD: John Schroeder c/o Pye Records 
Great Cumberland PI., London, Eng. 

PUB: Northern ASCAP c/o MCA 
Universal Studios, Universal City, Cal. 

WRITER: Francis Rossi 

FLIP: Gentleman Joe's Sidewalk Cafe 

#71* 

THE STORY OF ROCK & ROLL (2:40) 

The Turtles-White Whale 237 
8961 Sunset Blvd., L.A., Calif. 

PROD; Chip Douglas for Douglas 
Hatlelid Foundation c/o White Whale 
PUB: Rock Music BMI c/o Harry Fox 
460 Park Ave., NYC. 

WRITER: Nilsson FLIP: Can't You Hear The Cows 

#72 

I GOT YOU BABE (2:25) Etta James-Cadet 5606 
320 E. 21 Street Chicago, III. 

PROD: Rick Hall P.O. Box 2238 

603 E. Avalon, Muscle Shoals, Alabama. 

PUB; Cotillion BMI 1841 Bway, NYC. 

Chrismarc BMI c/o S. Bono 
7715 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

WRITER: S. Bono ARR: R. Hall 

FLIP: I Worship The Ground You Walk On 


#73 

MOUNTAIN OF LOVE (2:16) Ronnie Dove-Diamond 244 
1650 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Phil Kahl c/o Diamond 
PUB: Wren BMI 31 West 54 St., NYC. 

WRITER: H. Dorman ARR: Bill Justis 

FLIP: Never Gonna Cry (The Way I'll Cry Tonight) 


#74 

BABY YOU COME ROLLIN' ACROSS MY MIND (2:24) 
Peppermint Trolley Co.-Acta 815 

6565 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 

PROD: Dan Dalton 6357 Selma Av., H’wood, Cal. 
PUB: Bresnahan BMI 6357 Selma Av., H’wood, Cal. 
WRITER: Jesse Lee Kincaid ARR: D. Dalton 
FLIP: 9 O’clock Businessman 


#87* 

HERE COMES THE JUDGE (2:40) \ 

Pigmeat Markham-Chess 2049 v 

320 E. 21 St, Chicago, III. 

PROD: Gene Barge, c/o Chess 
PUB: Arc BMI 1619 Bway, NYC. 

WRITERS: Alen-Astor-Markham-Harvey 
FLIP: The Trial 

# 88 * 

LOVIN’ SEASON (2:40) Gene & Debbie-TRX 5010 
2510 Franklin Rd., Nashville, Tenn. *■ 

PROD: Don Gant c/o TRX , 

PUB: Acuff Rose BMI (same address) L 

WRITER: G. Thomas 
FLIP; Love Will Give Us Wings 


#75* 

LET YOURSELF GO (2:56) Elvis Presley-RCA 9547 

155 East 24 Street, NYC. 

PUB; Elvis Presley BMI 1619 Bway, NYC 
WRITER: Byers 

FLIP; Your Time Hasn’t Come Yet Baby 


#76 

IT’S OVER (2:58) Eddy Arnold-RCA 9525 
155 East 24th Street NYC. 

PROD: Chet Atkins c/o RCA Victor 
800 17th Ave. S., Nashville, Tenn. 

PUB: Honey Comb ASCAP 
9220 Sunset Blvd., L.A., Calif. 

WRITER: Rodgers ARR: Bill Walker 
FLIP: No Matter Whose Baby You Are 


#77* 

ELEANOR RIGBY (2:56) Ray Charles-ABC 11090 

1330 Ave. of the Americas, NYC 

PROD: Tangerine Records 

2107 W. Washington Blvd., L.A., Calif. 

PUB: Maclen BMI 1780 Bway, NYC. 

WRITERS: J. Lennon-P. McCartney 
FLIP: Understanding 


#78 

FOLSOM PRISON BLUES (2:46) 

Johnny Cash-Columbia 44513 
51 West 52nd Street NYC. 

PROD: Bob Johnston c/o Columbia 

PUB: Hi-Lo BMI 639 Madison Av. Memphis, Tenn. 

WRITER: Johnny Cash FLIP: The Folk Singer 


#79* 

IT’S NICE TO BE WITH YOU (2:51) 

The Monkees-Colgems 1023 
711 Fifth Ave., NYC. 

PROD: The Monkees c/o Colgems 
PUB: Columbia/Screen Gems BMI (same address) 
WRITER: Goldstein ARR: Shorty Rogers 
FLIP; D. W. Washburn 


#80* 

HURDY GURDY MAN (3:15) 
Donovan-Epic 10345 
51 West 52nd Street NYC. 

PROD: Micki Most 

101 Dean St., London, Eng. 

PUB: Peer Int’l BMI 1619 Bway, NYC 
WRITER: D. Leitch FLIP: Teen Angel 


#81 

COMPETITION AIN’T NOTHING (2:25) 

Little Carl Carlton-Back Beat 588 
2809 Erastus St., Houston, Texas. 

PROD: Webb & Hiram 

467 Algonquin St., Detroit, Mich. 

PUB: Don BMI 2809 Erastus St, Houston, Tex. 
WRITERS: Wm. Webb-Louise Hiram 
ARR: Wm. Webb FLIP: Three Way Love 


#82- 

LOVER’S HOLIDAY (2:34) 

Peggy Scott & Jo Jo Bensen-SSS Int’l 736 
1650 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Huey P. Meaux 

c/o Shelby Singleton, 1650 Bway, NYC. 

PUB: Crazy Cajun BMI 

2315 Portsmouth, Houston, Texas 

WRITERS: Thomas-McRee-Thomas 

FLIP: Here With Me 


#83* 

YOUR TIME HASN’T COME YET, BABY (1:49) 
Elvis Presley-RCA 9547 
155 East 24th Street, NYC. 

PUB: Elvis Presley BMI 1619 Bway, NYC. 
WRITERS: Hirschhorn-Casha 
FLIP: Let Yourself Go 


#84 

FACE IT GIRL, IFS OVER (3:09) 

Nancy Wilson-Capitol 2136 
1750 N. Vine, L.A. Caiif. 

PROD: David Cavanaugh c/o Capitol 
PUB: Richard Irwin ASCAP 1650 Bway, NYC. 
WRITERS: Frank Stanton-Andy Badale 
ARR: H. B. Bamum FLIP: The End Of Our Love 


#85 

HERE COMES THE JUDGE (2:17) 

Buena Vistas-Marquee 443 

13200 W. Warren Ave., Dearborn, Mich. 

PROD: Carl Cisco c/o Tincal 

PUB: Tincal BMI 

22821 Hayden Rd. Farmington, Mich. 
Chetkay BMI c/o Marquee 
WRITERS: R. Sherae-Nick Ameno 
ARR: Mike Terry FLIP: Big Red 


#86 

EYES OF A NEW YORK WOMAN (2:50) 

B. J. Thomas-Scepter 12219 
254 West 54th Street, NYC. 

PROD; Chips Moman 

827 Thomas St., Memphis, Tenn. 

PUB: Press BMI 905 16th Ave. So. Nashville, Tenn. 

WRITER: M. James 

FLIP: I May Never Get To Heaven 


#89* 

(THE PUPPET SONG) WHISKEY ON A SUNDAY (2:38) 

Irish Rovers-Decca 32333 

445 Park Ave., NYC 

PROD: Charles Bud Dant c/o Decca 

PUB: Essex ASCAP 10 Columbus Circle, NYC. 

WRITER: Glin Hughes 

FLIP: The Orange & The Green 


#90 

AIN’T NOTHIN BUT A HOUSE PARTY (2:35) ^ 

Show Stoppers-Heritage 800 

c/o MGM 1350 Ave. of the Americas, NYC. 

PROD: D. Sharah for Jerry Ross Prod. 

1855 Broadway, NYC. 

PUB: Dandelion BMI 919 N. Broad St., Phila., Pa. 

Clairlyn BMI c/o Irving B. Weinroth <’4 

1203 Gainsboro Rd., Bala Cynwyd, 

Montgomery County, Pa. 

FLIP: What Can A Man Do -V 

#91* 

AMERICA IS MY HOME Part I (3:15) 

James Brown-King 12413 

1540 Brewster Ave., Cinn., Ohio 

PROD: James Brown 850 7th Ave., NYC. 

PUB: Dynatone BMI 
1540 Brewster Ave., Cinn., Ohio 
Writers: J. Brown-H. Moore 
FLIP: America Is My Home Part II 

#92* 

SWEET MEMORIES (2:30) -4 

Andy Williams-Columbia 44527 
51 West 52nd Street, NYC. 

PROD: Nick De Caro c/o Coiumbia 

PUB; Acuff Rose BMI 

2510 Franklin Rd., Nashville, Tenn. 

WRITER: M. Newberry ARR: Nick De Caro 
FLIP: You Are Where Everything Is 


#93* yt 

YES SIR, THAT’S MY BABY (2:09) 

Baja Marimba Band-A & M 937 i 

1416 La Brea, H’Wood, Calif. 

PROD: Allen Stanton & Herb Alpert c/o A & M 
PUB: Bourne ASCAP 136 W. 52 St., NYC. 

WRITERS: G. Kahn-W. Donaldson 
ARR: Julius Weehter FLIP: Brasilia 


#94> 

LET ME BE LONELY (3:35) 

Dionne Warwick-Scepter 12216 

254 West 54th Street, NYC. 

PROD: Bacharach & David . 

c/o Fred E. Ahlert Jr., 15 E. 48th St., NYC. '' 

PUB: Jac ASCAP & Blue Seas ASCAP 

15 East 48th Street, NYC. i 

WRITERS: Bacharach-David ARR: Bacharach 

FLIP: Do You Know The Way To San Jose 

#95* 

YOU’RE GOOD FOR ME (3:01) 

Lou Rawls-Capitol 2172 4 

1750 N. Vine, H’wood, Calif. 

PROD: Dave Axelrod c/o Capitol 

PUB: Metric BMI 1556 N. La Brea, H’wood, Cal. 

WRITERS: Mack David-Larry Collins 
FLIP: Soul Serenade 


#96* 

WITH PEN IN HAND (3:32) 

Billy Vera-Atlantic 2526 
1841 Broadway, NYC. 

PROD: Chip Taylor 51 W. 52 St, NYC. 

PUB: UNART BMI c/o United Artists 
729 7th Ave., NYC 

WRITER: Bobby Goldsboro K 

ARR: Arif Mardin FLIP: Good Morning Blues 

#97 

2 -f 2 s T (2:49) Bob Seger-Capltol 2143 
1750 N. Vine, Hollywood, Calif. 

PROD: Wayne Shuier c/o Capitoi 

PUB: Gear ASCAP 575 Madison Ave., NYC. 

WRITER; B. Seger FLIP: Death Row « 

#98 . 

RANDY (2:23) The Happenings-B.T. Puppy 540 
c/o Jubilee 1790 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: The Tokens 1697 Bway, NYC. ' 

PUB: Bright Tunes BMI 1 Hanson PI., Bklyn, N.Y. 

WRITERS: D. Libert-R. Miranda 

ARR: Jimmy Wisner 

FLIP: Love Song Of Mommy & Daddy 

#99* ^ 

SEALED WITH A KISS (2:22) 

Gary Lewis-Liberty 56037 ^ 

6920 Sunset Blvd., L.A. Calif. 

PROD: Snuff Garrett 

6922 Hollywood Blvd., H’wood, Calif. 

PUB: Post ASCAP c/o Metric 
1560 N. La Brea, H’wood, Calif. 

WRITERS: Peter Udell-Gary Geld 
ARR: Al Capps FLIP: Sara Jane 


# 100 * 

YOU GOT STYLE (2:05) Jon & Robin-Abnak 130 

825 Olive Street, Dallas, Texas 
PROD: Abnak (same address) 

PUB: Unart c/o United Artists BMI 
729 Seventh Ave., NYC. 

WRITERS: J. Barry-A. Kim 
FLIP: Thursday Morning 


34 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 



Consumer Electronic Saks 
Show General 1st Qtr Slide 


WASHINGTON— Total U.S. sales of 
consumer electronic products, includ- 
ing domestic-label and foreign-label 
imports, for the first quarter of 1968 
have been released by the Electronic 
Industries Association. The EIA report 
reflects the size of the U.S. market in 
units for television receivers, radios 
and phonos for the first three months 
of 1968, along with comparisons for 
the same period in 1967. 

Total sales of television receivers 
for the first quarter reached 2,796,047 
units in 1968 vs. 3,032,966 in 1967. U.S. 
sales of domestically produced units 
accounted for 2,486,157 of total units 
for the January^March 1968 period. 
Foreign-label imports for the three 
months amounted to 108,945 units, 
down from the 211,310 television re- 
ceivers sold by foreign makers under 
their own brand names in the same 
period of 1967. 

U.S. -brand television receiver im- 
ports totaled 200,972 in the first 1968 
quarter, compared with 157,994 in the 
same 1967 months. 

Radio Sales Down 

Factory sales of U.S. home radios 
in the first quarter of 1968 added up 
to 6,224,007 units, of which 1,445,579 
were domestically produced. In last 
year’s first quarter, the total was 
6,380,468 and the domestically pro- 

Musicor Inks 
Winterhalter 

NEW YORK — Musicor Records presi- 
dent Art Talmadge announced the 
pacting of Hugo Winterhalter to the 
label on a long-term, exclusive basis. 

Winterhalter, long associated with 
such names as Perry Como, Mario 
Lanza, Frank Sinatra, Doris Day, etc., 
was responsible for aiding Eddie 
Fisher to reap 18 straight hits during 
his stay with RCA. 

Winterhalter’s first album for Musi- 
cor is being slated for immediate re- 
lease. A two record set, featuring 
Winterhalter fronting over 70 musi- 
cians in a program of all time movie 
greats from “Gone With The Wind” 
right up to today’s “To Sir With Love” 
and “Camelot,” the LP will retail for 
the low price of $5.79. Musicor’s suc- 
cess with a similar low-priced 2 LP set 
from Gene Pitney has prompted the 
move. Another LP is planned for early 
fall release teaming Winterhalter with 
pianist Eddie Heywood. An earlier 
teaming of the pair resulted in the 
million-selling “Canadian Sunset.” 

“It’s my firm conviction that Hugo 
Winterhalter, who has been able to 
bridge the gap between his early work 
with the big bands, through the 40’s 
and 50’s pop vocalist era, right up to 
today’s market, will provide for Musi- 
cor a new dimension to add to a grow- 
ing group of successful recording art- 
ists,” said Talmadge. 



BIG BROTHERS — Ernie Altschuler 
(right), division vice president and 
executive vp of pop A&R for RCA 
Victor Records, joins the Brotherhood 
in a massive handshake of congratula- 
tions upon the team’s signing to his 
label. The young West Coast group 
had just concluded a press confer- 
ence appearance in Hollywood when 
the above photo was taken. 


duced portion of the total was 1,843,- 
991 units. 

Foreign label imports of home ra- 
dios dipped slightly, from 3,758,011 in 
the first three months of 1967, to 3,- 
577,164 in the same 1968 period. 
Domestic-label imports, however, in- 
creased from 778,466 in the earlier 
period to 1,201,264 in the first three 
months of 1968, or from 12 per cent 
to 19 per cent of the market. 

Auto Radios Up 

Auto radios appear to be having a 
good year. First-quarter 1968 total 
U.S. sales rose to 2,903,959 in contrast 
to the 2,295,381 total for the first 
1967 quarter. While foreign-label im- 
ports had much to do with the in- 
crease (rising from 143,706 in 1967 
to 401,291 in 1968), U.S. production 
soared from 2,151,675 units to 2,502,- 
668 in 1968. 

The total U.S. radio market, there- 
fore, showed a clear increase of a 
little over five per cent in first-quarter 
comparisons, from 8,675,849 units to 
9,127,966 units. While factory sales of 
U.S.-produced models declined from 
3,995,666 units in the first three 
months of 1967 to 3,948,247 in the 
same 1967 period, domestic-label im- 
ports increased substantially to 1,201,- 
264 units in this year’s first quarter, 
froim 778,466 at the same time in 
1967. Foreign-label radio imports 
edged up slightly to 3,978,455 from 
3,901,717 the previous year. 

Softer Phono Market 

The U.S. phonograph market was a 
little softer at the beginning of this 
year than last: Total phonograph sales 
of 1,354,594 in 1968 lagged behind the 
1,638,730 registered in the first quarter 
of 1967, despite a domestic-label im- 
port increase to 256,088 units from 
89,264 in the earlier period. The over- 
all drop is accounted for by the decline 
in foreign-label imports (from 413,772 
to 151,008) and in U.S. production 
(from 1,135,694 to 947,498). 


CRDC Makes Three 
Nat'l Promo Shifts 

HOLLYWOOD— Ken Mansfield, Capi- 
tol Records Distributing Corp. nation- 
al promotion manager, has announced 
several organizational changes. 

Ronnie Granger has been named 
field promotion manager and will be 
responsible for all field promotion per- 
sonnel. With CRDC since 1965, Grang- 
er has served as district promotion 
man and, most recently, as single sales 
manager. 

A1 Coury moves into the newly 
created position of artist relations 
manager. During his ten-year tenure 
with Capitol, A1 has been a sales rep, 
district sales promo rep, and district 
promotion man in Boston. 

Buck Stapleton will become radio/ 
TV services manager. In thirteen 
years with Capitol, Stapleton has also 
served in various sales and promotion 
capacities, in addition to being an 
assistant producer. 

All three will report directly to 
Mansfield. 


Peter & Gordon In U.S. 

For Concerts, Promo 

HOLLYWOOD — Capitol has released 
a new single by British duo Peter and 
Gordon, “You’ve Had Better Times” 
b/w “Sipping My Wine,” to coincide 
with the pairs arrival in the U.S. for 
concert dates, press conferences and 
TV guest shots. Both sides were pro- 
duced by the boys and written by 
Gordon. 

TV spots already set are the Mike 
Douglas Show, the Dick Cavett Show, 
the Woody Woodbury Show and the 
Steve Allen Show. 

Following a brief stay here, the 
pair will leave for the Philippines for 
four concert appearances commencing 
June 15th. 


Abramson To Head 
E. Coast Sales 
For Mercury 

CHICAGO — Mercury Records has 
named Jules Abramson East Coast 
district sales manager, it was an- 
nounced by Irwin Steinberg, executive 
vice president of the label. 

Abramson, who has served as man- 
ager of the firm’s Merrec distrib in 
Philadelphia since it’s opening four 
years ago, replaces Abe Chayet, who 
recently was named product manager 
for Blue iRock, Mercury’s new R&B 
label. Prior to joining Merrec, Abram- 
son, a native of Philadelphia, served as 
a Phillips salesman for four years 
with Chips Distributing. The 36-year- 
old Temple University graduate lives 
with his wife, Lillian, and three chil- 
dren, Ronald, Susan and Jill. 

Taking over for Abramson in Phila- 
delphia is Mario IDaulerio, who has 
been a salesman at the Merrec branch 
for four years. Prior to joining Mer- 
cury, Daulerio, 35, served four years 
as a salesman for Universal Distribu- 
tors and seven years as branch man- 
ager of the King Records branch, both 
in Philly. Daulerio and his wife, Isabel, 
have four children, Mario Jr., Theresa 
Ann, James and Maria. 



Jules Abramson 


New Duties For 
Bakkemo At WB 

BEVERLY HILLS— Warner Bros.- 
Seven Arts Records national promo- 
tion manager Bill Casady announced 
the appointment of Clyde Bakkemo to 
the post of national pro'motion, special 
projects. 

For the last two years Bakkemo has 
handled promotional responsibilities 
for the L.A. market area, and will 
continue in that position, as well as 
taking on special assignments under 
the direction of Casady. He will con- 
tinue to operate out of the company’s 
Burbank home offices. 


Bly-‘Classical Gas’ Tour 

HOLLYWOOD — Viva Records v.p. 
Mel Bly has embarked on a nationwide 
tour on behalf of “Classical Gas,” the 
new Midnight String Quartet single. 
Group was voted the No. 1 new instru- 
mental group in the 1967 Cash Box 
year-end poll. “Classical Gas” is the 
Midnight String Quartet’s first single 
designed for good music and top 40 
stations. Bly will be co-ordinating with 
distributors in promotion and mer- 
chandising efforts. 


Power winds Up U.S. Tour 

NEW YORK — Grant Smith & the 
Power, recently signed to a writing/ 
production deal with the Big 3 (Rob- 
bins-Feist-Miller), have just completed 
their first U.S. tour. The Canadian 
pop group headlined a 3-week stand 
at Trudy Hellei’’s in New York and 
followed with dates at Alphonso’s and 
the Echo Loung, both in the Boston 
area, and the Glenn Park Casino in 
Buffalo. The Toronto-based act is now 
preparing for a summer tour of Can- 
adian rock spots. 


Moseley To Direct 

ABC Singles Promo •* 

NEW YORK — Ron Moseley has joined 
ABC Records as director of national 
singles promotion for the label and 
its subsids. Moseley will report to Otis ^ 
Smith, director of singles sales. 

Moseley most recently handled na-.„. 
tional promotion for Loma Records 
and special projects for Warner Broth- ^ 
ers and Reprise. From 1966-67 he did 
national promotion for MGM. Moseley 
has been responsible for breaking such 
hits as Linda Jones’ “Hypnotized,” 
“Pata Pata” by Miriam Makeba,** 
“Look At Granny Run Run” and 
“Ain’t Nobody Home” by Howard Tate 
and Spyder Turner’s “Stand By Me.” 



Ron Moseley 


Orpheum Offers 
Tst LP Release 

NEW YORK — Orpheum Records has.^ 
unveiled its first album release. The 
release consists of fourteen albums, 
most of them in the jazz, and classical 
fields. ^ 

Highlighting the release are five 
reissue jazz albums, the first sets 
Orpheum’s Jazz Legend series. These 
LP’s which have not been available 
for over five years, are: “The Great 
Muggsy Spanier,” “The Great New 
Orleans Rhythm Kings,” “The Great n: 
Jelly Roll Morton,” “The Great Bix 
Beiderbecke” and “The Great Louis -i 
Armstrong.” All five albums are pack- 
aged in new double-fold jackets and 
available in electronic stereo. 

Orpheum’s classical series bows with 
four albums by renowned opera sing- 
ers. These sets, all re-channelled for 
stereo, are: “The Great Enrico Caru- 
so,” “The Great Feodor Chaliapin,” 
“The Great Beniamino Gigli” and “The 
Great Kirsten Flagstand.” 

Five newly-packaged LP’s round 
out Orpheum’s first album release. 
Three of them are in the classical 
series: “An Anthology Of Guitar 
Music, The Sixteenth Century,” by ^ 
Charles Byrd; and Volumes 1 and 2 of 
“18th Century Flute Duets,” by Jean- 
Pierre Rampal and Julius Baker. 

Orpheum’s Specialty series makes -< 
its debut with a humorous album, 
“Peter Ustinov At Grand Prix Of 
Gibraltar” and an album of electronic 
music, “Son Nova 1988.” 

Outside of the U.S., Orpheum will ^ 
be represented by London Records In- 
ternational. ■* 

Orpheum has signed Phyllis Mc- 
Guire, the Plum Beach Incident, 
Richard Kiley, the Harlem Children’s 
Chonis and a Baltimore rock group. 



36 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 









ORPHEUS 

Ascending again with a simultaneous 
hit single from their phenomenal 
first album, currently climbing the charts. 

IVe never seen 
(oue like this 

K-13947 




JAMES BROWN and THE FABULOUS FLAMES 


The Instrumental Smash 











CORDS 




3 Special Concerts Set For Newport 


NEW YORK — Festival Field, a thirty 
acre plot on the outskirts of Newport, 
Rhode Island that seats 18,000 people, 
will again be the cite of the Newport 
Jazz Festival (July 4-7) and the New- 
port Folk Festival (July 23-28) and 
also, this year, of three special one- 
night performances by Harry Bela- 
fonte (July 20), Andy Williams 
(August 3) and Herb Alpert and the 
Tijuana Brass (August 10). George 
Wein is the producer of the festivals 
and of the three special concerts. 

Jazz Festival 

Highlight of the Jazz Festival will 
be the “Schlitz Salute To Big Bands” 
Friday evening, July 5. The evening 
will encompass over thirty years of 
big band history and will bring to- 
gether Count Basie, Duke Ellington, 
and Woody Herman and their ever- 
green orchestras. Dizzy Gillespie will 
reassemble his big band for the oc- 
casion. Special guests will include 
Charlie Barnet, Tex Beneke, Benny 
Carter, Erskine Hawkins, and Jack 
Leonard. Also, producer Wein has in- 
vited the winners of big band com- 
petitions at Notre Dame and M.I.T. 
to participate. The afternoon sessions 
will have the accent on big bands as 
well. Trumpeter Clark Terry will 
showcase his aggregation Friday 
afternoon, and Sunday, July 7, Ray 
Charles will have an afternoon all 
to himself. 

Closing out the Festival on Sunday 


'MUSIC BORN TO LIVE' 


THE BAJA MARIMBA BAND 
"YES SIR THAT'S MY BABY' 


A&M 


AL HIRT 

"UNFORGETTABLE" 

"SMILE" 

"IMAGINATION" 

RCA Victor 

PETULA CLARK 
"ETERNALLY" 

"ANSWER ME MY LOVE" 

GUY MARKS Warner-7 Arts 

"LITTLE SHOEMAKER" 

"OBJECT OF MY AFFECTION" 
"CARELESS" 

ABC Paramount 

WES MONTGOMERY 

"WILLOW WEEP FOR ME" 

Verve 

AL HIRT 

"BYE BYE BLUES" 

RCA Victor 

JOHN GARY 
"YOU AND I" 

RCA Victor 

JACKIE GLEASON 

"LOVE YOUR MAGIC SPELL" 

Capitol 

ED AMES 

"30 DAYS HATH SEPTEMBER" 

RCA Victor 

BUDDY MERRILL 
"ARMENS THEME" 

Accent 

DAVE BRUBECK 

"THESE FOOLISH THINGS" 

CHET ATKINS Columbia 

"WHEN YOU WISH 
UPON A STAR" 

RCA Victor 

LYN ROMAN 

"A LITTLE BIT OF SUNSHINE" 

Dot 

DON GIBSON 

"A MAIDEN'S PRAYER" 

RCA Victor 

BONNIE GUITAR 

"A MAIDEN'S PRAYER" 

Dot 

BILLY VAUGHN 

"RAINBOWS AND ROSES" 

Dot 

BOB CARROLL 

"IN THE CAUSE OF FREEDOM" 

Murbo 

T^*E PATRIOTS 

‘WHAT A DRAG IT IS" 
"BLANKETS AND CANDLES" 

Murbo 

BOURNE CO. 

MUSIC PUBLISHERS 
136 West 52 Street 
N. Y. C., N. Y. 10019 
(212) Cl 7-5500 


evening, July 7, will be the Don Ellis 
Orchestra. Combining elements of 
rock. Eastern music, modern classical 
music, folk music, and straight blow- 
ing jazz, this band was a hit at both 
the Monterey and Newport Festivals 
last year. 

The Jazz Festival will open on 
Thursday evening, July 4, with Nina 
Simone and Trio, the Cannonball 
Adderly Quintet, the Count Basie Or- 
chestra, the Gary Burton Quartet, 
Jim Hall, Barney Kessel, and the 
Mongo Santamaria Septet. 

Appearing on Friday afternoon, 
July 5, with the Clark Terry Big 
Band will be Rufus Harley, the Elvin 
Jones Trio and the Archie Shepp 
Quintet. 

Saturday afternoon, July 6, will 
spotlight Duke Ellington with Johnny 
Hodges and Benny Carter, the Mon- 
tego Joe Septet, the Tal Farlow 
Quartet, Sonny Criss, and Vi Redd. 

Saturday evening will showcase 
Dionne Warwick (who is making her 
Newport debut this year), Duke 
Ellington and Orchestra, the Hugh 
Masekela Quintet, the Alex Welsh 
Band and guests Ruby Braff, Bud 
Freeman, Pee Wee Russell and Joe 
Venuti, and award winners of the 
Notre Dame Jazz Festival. 

In addition to the Don Ellis Or- 
chestra, the closing Sunday evening 
show will include Ramsey Lewis, the 
Wes Montgomery Quintet, special 
guest Flip Wilson, the Horace Silver 
(Quintet, Roland Kirk, the Sound Of 
Feeling, and award winners of the 
Montreux Jazz Festival. 

Folk Festival 

Among the artists set for the Folk 
Festival are several who are making 
their first appearances at Newport 
this year. Tim Buckley, John Hart- 
ford, Taj Mahal and Janis Ian will 
all bow at the Fest on July 28. 

July 28 will also spotlight the re- 
union of the Junior Wells-Buddy Guy 
Blues Band, and later in the day, a 
tribute to the late Woody Guthrie 
which will unite tha Almanac Singers 
including Pete Seeger, Alan Lomax, 
Bess Hawes along with Judy Collins, 
Jack Elliott and Woody’s son, Arlo. 

In an attempt to free pei’formers 
from the restrictions of time and for- 
mat usually found on festival pro- 
grams, the directors of the Newport 
Folk Festival have decided to try an 
evening program which the per- 
formers will control themselves ac- 
cording to the mood of the moment. 

On Thursday evening, July 25, Jim 
Kweskin of Jug Band fame will bring 
together several of the younger per- 
formers on the folk scene today and 
let them do whatever they choose to 
do at the moment either in song or in- 
strumentally. His hope is that the re- 
laxed, party-like atmosphere will pro- 
duce more exciting and honest per- 
formances than those that usually 
occur in concert form. 

Among those participating will be 
members of the Kweskin Jug Band, 
Mel Lyman and his “Family” from 
Fort Hill in Boston, Eric Von 
Schmidt, Richie Havens, Mike Cooney, 
Sandy Bull, Taj Mahal, and members 
of the Kaleidoscope from the west 
coast. 

On July 27, a varied program will 
be presented. It will include such art- 
ists as Roy AcufF, the Smoky Moun- 
tain Boys, George Hamilton IV, Ralph 
Stanley, Ken Threadgill, Jack Elliot 
and B. B. King. 

Daytime events at the Folk Festival 
include a Children’s Day on July 24, 
a Hootenanny on July 25, workshops 
on July 26 and July 27, and on July 
28, a concert of religious music in the 
morning and a concert of contem- 
porary music in the afternoon. In- 
cluded in the Children’s day program 
of song, dance and drama will be the 
Bread and Puppet Theatre, Jim 
Kweskin, Taj Mahal, Sam Hinton, 
Bernice Reagon, Henry Crowdog, an 
American Indian, and Allannis Obom- 
sawin, from Canada. 

The July 28 concert of contem- 
porary music will showcase Tim 
Buckley, John Hartford, Taj Mahal, 
Judy (5ollins, Frank Proffitt, Jr. and 
others. 


FOCUS ON jazz 


iiiiiiiM mi HiiiiiiuiiiiiiiininDiiPiiiiyin 


mg' 


ODE TO 52nd STREET— KENNY 
BURRELL (Cadet 798)-^ This is an 
album of high level music, much be- 
yond the average release. On it, the 
guitar of Burrell is heard to its best 
advantage and much of the success of 
the album should also be credited to 
Richard Evans, who collaborated on 
most of the compositions, arranged 
the music, and conducted the orchestra 
that accompanied Kenny’ guitar. One 
side of the album is devoted to an 
extended work, “Suite For Guitar 
And Orchestra”, a four part inte- 
grated work that is much less formal 
than the title suggests. The flip side 
is made up of five selections, three 
of which are originals. Dizzy Gil- 
lespie’s “Con Alma”, and Dmitri Tiom- 
kin’s beautiful “Wild Is The Wind”. 
Each successive Kenny Burrell album 
gives evidence of his continuing ma- 
turity as a complete musician and on 
this new Cadet album, in the company 
of a large orchestra using brass, 
strings and woodwinds, he gives a very 
impressive performance. 


NEW YORK-1208 MILES — JAY 
McSHANN ORCHESTRA (Decca 
79236) — This is another in the Jazz 
Heritage Series that was introduced 
about eight months ago, vintage ma- 
terial from the vaults at Decca that 
are rich with precious music. These 
sides are from the years 1941-1943, 
and the 1208 miles that are mentioned 
in the title of this album allude to 
the distance from New York to Kansas 
City, whence the band originated. Sig- 
nificant in this release is the work of 
Charlie Parker and the singing of 
Walter Brown and A1 Hibbler. Mc- 
Shann’s band was very much in the 
tradition of the jump style and, while 
the band wasn’t that well known out- 
side of its own territory, when it 
journeyed East the band made a con- 
siderable reputation for itself. The 
sound on the disc is remarkably good 
considering that these fourteen tracks 
were recorded over a quarter of a 
century ago. For all who concern 
themselves with the historical aspect 
of jazz, particularly in the big band 
realm, this Decca Jazz Heritage re- 
lease should be an important part of 
a record library. 


“ . . . AND HIS MOTHER CALLED 
HIM BILL” — DUKE ELLINGTON 
ORCHESTRA (Victor 3906) It’s just 
a year and a week since Billy Stray- 
horn passed away and the release of 
this new Ellington album is a fitting 
memorial to Sweet Pea on the first 
anniversary of his death. All twelve 
compositoins are originals by Stray- 
horn and I doubt if an album was ever 
recorded with more love and tender- 
ness than was this one. Recorded in 
the Fall of 1967, the album features 
the regular Ellington orchestra, plus 
Clark Terry on fiugelhorn. The span of 


FEGAI 


It’s been some time since I’ve done 
a recap on some of the latest jazz re- 
leases, so here are a few comments 
about a handful of albums that have 
crossed my turntable, each one worthy 
of “The MF Stamp Of Good Listen- 


years covers “Rain Check” from 1941. 
to “Blood Count”, Billy Strayhom’s' 
last composition, written in a hospital 
for a Carnegie Hall concert in 1%7. 
Included on this album is “Rock Skip- 
pin’ At The Blue Note”, previously 
only available in this country on a 
Columbia extended play recording, and. 
an Ellington piano solo of “I^tus Q 
Blossom”, of which Duke says, “ThatJI 


is what he most liked to hear me | 


play.” Duke Ellington albums are al 
ways welcome arrivals, but this one 
is especially so. 


GEORGE VAN EPS’ SEVEN- 
STRING GUITAR (Capitol 2783)—, 
About a dozen years ago, George Van 
Eps recorded an album for Columbia 
titled, “Mellow Guitar”. It was the 
kind of album that sold quietly, but 
steadily, and, to the best of my knowl- 
edge, is still available. It was the 
kind of album that all of Van Eps’ 
fellow guitarists knew about and own- 
ed, as one would own a primer. Then 
there was a hiatus of nine years when 
George practically stopped playing, 
let alone recording. In 1966 he did 
an album for Capitol called, “My 
Guitar”, which drew great acclaim 
from the critics. This new Van Eps 
album, played on a seven-string guitar, 
the kind of instrument that he has 
been playing since 1940, is an absolute i 
joy to the ear and it epitomizes the 
essence of taste in music. In the com- 
pany of marimba and drums, Van Eps 
explores twelve selections, practically 
all from the standard bag and all 
played with consummate artistry. His 
lean attack makes him the master of 
understatement, and in his economy 
what good notes he plays! Playing ind 
company of a marimba, the voicing is! 
beautiful and shows Van Eps cif to/ 
his best advantage. This is the kind 
of rare album that, unless one listens 
attentively, could be regarded as a 
moderately ordinary one. But with 
great things, isn’t it often thus ? 


NATURAL SOUL— NAT ADDER- 
LEY (Milestone 9009) — These sides 
were recorded in 1963, presumably for 
release on the Riverside label, defunct 
not long after these were done. With 
the advent of the Milestone label, 
some of the better things that were 
in the can, have begun to be released 
on the new label. The date was super- 
vised by Orrin Keepnews, presently 
at the helm of the Milestone label. 
Nat’s coronet is heard here in the com- j 
pany of Junior Mance, Bob Cranshaw, 
Mickey Roker and Jim Hall or Kenny 
Burrell. All eight tunes are originals 
hy Adderley, whose composer credits 
include such hits as “Work Song”, 
“Jive Samba” and “Sermonette. For 
most of his professional career Nat 
Adderley has been a member of his 
brother’s group. The Cannonball Ad- , 
derley Quintet. The consequence of 
such an arrangement is that, as a 
sideman, very often the impact of a 
player’s talent is diminished. Well, if 
anyone has any doubt about Nat Ad- 
derley’s credentials as a top flight 
player, this album, albeit five years 
old, should clear that situation up. 


N.Y. Jazz Festival Set 

NEW YORK— The Third Annual 
New York Jazz Festival has been set 
for the weekend of Aug. 17 and 18 
at Downing Stadium on Randall’s 
Island according to an announcement 
by Festival producer Teddy Powell. 

The 35,000 seat stadium will be the 
scene for Sat. night, Aug. 17 appear- 
ances by Ray Charles, Miles Davis, 
Dizzy Gillespie, Ahmad Jamal, Eddie 
Harris, comedian Slappy White, 
Shirley Scott, Stanley Turrentine and 
blues singer Jimmy Witherspoon. 

Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masekela, 
Arthur Prysock, Mongo Santamaria, 
comedian Dick Gregory, Lou Donald- 
son, Brother Jack McDuff and Jimmy 
Witherspoon will be the attractions 
on Sunday night, Aug. 18. 

WLIB-FM’s Billy Taylor & Del 
Shields and WHAT’s (Phil.) Sid 
Marks will share M. C. chores. 


Shankar & Newport Plan 
Boston Indian Concerts ) 

NEW YORK — Sitarist Ravi Shankar j 
has assembled an array of Indian I 
classical musicians for a musical event I 
called “Festival From India,” which I 
Festival Productions, producers of the I 
Newport Festivals, will present at the f 
War Memorial Auditorium in Boston j 
on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 2 and 3. < 
In addition to the sitar, sarod, and 
tabla, many new instruments will be 
introduced such as the one hundred 
and sixteen string santoor and the 
veena, ancient forerunner of the sitar. 
Music presented will combine the 
classical sound of North Indian Hin- 
dustani music associated with Shan- , 
kar and the Carnatic musical tradi- 
tion of South India and will involve j 
about a dozen musicians in addition ■ 
to Ravi Shankar, Alla Rakha, Shankar 
Ghosh, and Ali Akbar Khan. 


40 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 



Eiclusive Monagcmenf: 


Noshville 4 . Tenne$$ee 
CYpffsi 7 5366 


in the most powerful performance of 


is career on mgm 

RECORDS 


MGM Records is a division of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. 



New York Is A Motown Summer Festival 


NEW YORK— Martha Reeves & the 
Vandellas’ Copacabana opening last 
week (6) kicked off a summer which 
will find virtually every top Motown 
act appearing in the N.Y. area. The 
Vandellas become the fourth Motown 


Wrighf Appointed To Date, 
Ode, Immediate Promo Post 

NEW YORK— Don Wright has been 
named promotion manager for the 
eastern region for Date, Ode, and 
Immediate Records, according to an 
announcement by Bruce Hinton, man- 
ager of sales and promotion for the 
three labels. 

In his new position, Wright will be 
responsible to Hinton for the promo- 
tion of the Date, Ode, and Immediate 
product in the eastern United States. 
He will be based in New York. 

This recent appointment brings the 
Date field force to its full complement 
of men, consisting of Marshall Blon- 
stein (western region), Don Burt 
(southern region), and Jim McHugh, 
who was recently appointed to the 
midwest region. 

Coming with many strong creden- 
tials to his new position, Wright was 
formerly national promotion manager 
for Twentieth Century Fox Records, 
and prior to this, he was regional 
promotion manager for Kapp Records. 



Don Wright 


group to play the usually adult-ori- 
ented nightspot (others were the Su- 
premes, Four Tops and Temptations), 
and Gladys Knight & the Pips will be- 
come the fifth when they open there 
on July 11 for a two-week stand. 

Other Motown acts set for New 
York appearances include the Su- 
premes and Stevie Wonder, at Forest 
Hills Music Festival on Aug. 3; the 
Four Tops and Marvin Gaye, also 
Forest Hills, on Aug. 24; the Tempta- 
tions, who do a week, July 15-21, at 
Westbury Music Fair, and two weeks 
Aug. 29-Sept. 11, at the Copa; Smokey 
RoWnson & the Miracles, Aug. 19 at 
Westbury; and Bobby Taylor & the 
Vancouvers, newest Motown chart 
group, who play the Apollo June 21- 
27. In addition to their Copa stint, 
Gladys Knight will also do a night at 
Westbury on July 29. 


StandelTs Lead Solos 
In New Tower Contract 

BEVERLY HILLS— Dick Dodd, lead 
singer of Tower’s Standells, has sign- 
ed a new recording contract with 
Green Grass Productions, who turned 
out the group hits. Tower will also re- 
lease the Dodd dates. 

Concurrent with the new contract. 
Tower will launch a large scale pro- 
motion for the one-time Mouseketeer, 
including an 18-city tour for p.a.’s and 
TV shots, as well as cocktail recep- 
tions and luncheons with local press 
and d.j.’s. Hugh Dallas, Tower’s na- 
tional sales manager and Dave Fox, 
their national promotion director are 
coordinating the campaign which will 
also include a merchandising build-up 
utilizing poster, mailers and contests. 

The signing was worked out by Ray 
Harris, Green Grass exec and Bud 
Frazier of Tower. A previously re- 
corded single featuring Dodd with the 
Standells is being set for release in 
the later part of June. 


SILVER 



Have a taste 

Silver Apples marry time to space through sound, and transport 
you to the realm of total musical experience. 



Play twice 
before listening! 


KS3502 


Full color souvenir 
poster enclosed 



a Otvision ot Universaf Cify Records, /nc. 


Top 50 In 


R&B Locations 


1 THINK 

Aretha Franklin (Atlantic 2518) 1 


2 AIN'T NOTHING LIKE 
THE REAL THING 

Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell 

(Tamla 54163) 2 


3 NEVER GIVE YOU UP 

Jerry Butler (Mercury 72798) 4 


4 the horse 

ClifF Nobles (Phil-La-Of-Soul 313) 8 


5 I COULD NEVER LOVE 
ANOTHER 

Temptations (Gordy 7072) 


6 TESTER LOVE 

Miracles (Tamla 54167) 10 


7 TIGHTEN UP 

Archie Bell (Atlantic 2478) 5 


8 I PROMISE TO WAIT 
MY LOVE 

Martha & Vandellas (Gordy 7070) 7 


9 LICKING STICK — LICKING 
STICK (PART I) 

James Brown 8i Famous Flames 

(King 6166) 13 


10 SHOO-BE-DOO-BE-DOO. 

DA-DAY 

Stevie Wonder (Tamla 54165) 6 


11 (YOU KEEP ME) HANGIN' ON 

Joe Simon (Sound Stage 7-2608) 12 


12 LOVER'S HOLIDAY 

Peggy Scott & Jo Jo Benson 

(SSS International 736) 14 


13 I'LL NEVER DO YOU WRONG 

Joe Tex (Dial 4076) 15 


14 COWBOYS TO GIRLS 

Intruders (Gamble (214) 9 


15 FACE IT GIRL IT'S OVER 

Nancy Wilson (Capitol 2136) 18 


16 PAYING THE COST TO BE 
THE BOSS 

B. B. King (Blues Way 61015) 11 


17 UNITED 

Peaches & Herb (Date 1603) 19 


18 the happy song 

Otis Redding (Volt 163) 16 


19 IT SHOULD HAVE BEEN ME 

Gladys Knight & The Pips (Soul 35045) 21 


20 YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT 
YOU MEAN TO ME 

Sam & Dave (Atlantic 2517) 22 


21 STONED SOUL PICNIC 

5th Dimension (Soul Sity 766) 32 


22 SAVE YOUR LOVE FOR ME 

Bobby Bland (Duke 435) 25 


23 I CAN REMEMBER 

James & Bobby Purify (Bell 721) 24 


24 I GOT YOU BABE 

Etta James (Cadet 5606) 23 


25 HERE COME DA JUDGE 

Buena Vistas (Marquee 443) 29 


26 the doctor 

Mary Wells (Jubilee 5621) 2 


27 HERE I AM BABY 

Marveletts (Tamla 54166) 3 


28 LISTEN HERE 

Eddie Harris (Atlantic 2487) 2 


29 GRAZING IN THE GRASS 

Hugh Masekela (UNI 55066) 


30 take time to know her 

Percy Sledge (Atlantic 2490) 2 


31 I WISH I KNEW 

Solomon Burke (Atlantic 2507) 2 


32 LET ME BE LONLEY 

Dionne Warwick (Scepter 12216) 


33 AMERICA IS MY HOME 

James Brown (King 6112) 


34 SUGAR DON'T TAKE AWAY 
MY CANDY 

Jive Five (Musicor 1305) 


35 UNDERSTANDING 

Ray Charles (ABC 11090) 


36 SOMETHING YOU NEVER 
GET USED TO 

Diana Ross & The Supremes 
(Motown 1126) 


37 A PLACE 

Precisions (Drew 1005) 


38 WHY (The King of Love Is Deoc 

Nina Simone (RCA Victor 9532) ' 


39 LOOK OVER YOUR SHOULDER 

O'Jays Bell 704 •< 


40 here comes the judge 

Shorty Long (Soul 35044) 


41 HITCH IT TO THE HORSE 

Fantastic Johnny C. 

(Phil La of Soul 315) 


42 I'M SORRY 

Delfonics (Philly Groove 151) 


43 COMPETITION AIN'T 
NOTHING 

Little Carl Carlton (Back Beat 588) 


44 YOUNG BOY 

Barbara Green (Renee 5001) 


45 BE YOUNG BE FOOLISH BE 
HAPPY 

Tams (ABC 11066) 


46 here comes the judge 

Pigmeat Markham (Chess 2049) 


47 I'VE GOT TO HAVE YOU 

Fantastic Four (Ric Tic 139) 


48 I'M GETTING ALONG 
ALRIGHT 

Raelets (Tangerine 984) 


49 I'VE GOT TO HOLD ON 

Ohio Players (Compass 7018) 


50 YOURS UNTIL TOMORROW 

Vivian Reed (Epic 10319) 


42 


Cash Box — June 15, 19< 


new ao Yoe foucwa 




WITH A"HDNEY”OF A NEW HIT- 


THAT’S new! 


UA 50318 

United Artists 

Entertainment from 
Transamenca Corporation 






HOLLYWOOD; CONSUMER MAGS REVISITED 


ughBoic Record RambUnys 


NYC: SOMETHING NEW UNDER THE SUN 


It was inevitable, with the expand- 
ing dimensions of rock, that someone 
would couple the wealth of electronic 
oscillation to the power of the best 
that goes on and on. 

Though electric breakthroughs have 
become commonplace with the devel- 
opment of classical schemes and elec- 
tric rock groups, psychedeliphiles, new 
blues and all the experimenters at en- 
gineering boards, amplifiers, etc.; it 
was (and is) the Silver Apples who 
can be credited with debuting the mar- 
riage of pure electronics with purely 
primitive rhythm for a brand new 
sound. 

Speaking of new things, this past 
weekend marked the premiere of the 
world’s first rock symphony, a 46-man 


NEW YORK 

Something new from Jimmy Wisner 
is his appearance as an artist with the 
theme from “The Swimmer.” At the 
session, he conducted and produced 
along with playing the piano. His own 
recording for Columbia was preceded 
by his first chore for the label, produc- 
ing the new Buckingham’s single 
“Back In Love Again,” which is cur- 
rently No. 59 on the Top 100. . . . Step- 
penwolf made its first east coast ap- 
pearance at the Fillmore East the past 
weekend, and is now playing Steve 
Paul’s Scene. The Dunhill act will be 
followed shortly by Arthur Brown, 
who is said to be concenti’ating more 
on music than the fiaming headpieces, 
masks, makeup, costumes and other 
paraphernalia that was more remarked 
upon in his recent NY appearances. . . . 

Although most of the credit for the 
current “Here Comes the Judge” furor 
is the result of Rowan & Martin’s 
“Laugh In” popularity, the phrase 
originated with comedy star Pigmeat 
Markham’s years old courtroom com- 
edly act. Slated for a show at the 
Blues Festival on Randall’s Island 
(July 21), Markham has a Chess single 
of “Here Comes the Judge” already 
starting to show results that put him 
in the sales running (No. 87) with the 
Magistrates (MGM), Shorty Long 
(Soul) and the Buena Vistas (Mar- 
quee) who are already in the top 100 
running. . . . The Young Savages now 
doing a two-week stand at the Attic 


Kasenetz-Katz Singing Orchestral Cir- 
cus. Bowing at Carnegie Hall, the en- 
semble spotted on Ed Sullivan’s pro- 
gram (9), and has since begun work- 
ing on a road tour. The core of the 
K.K.S.O.C. is a conglomerate of the 
Ohio Express, 1910 Fruitgum Compa- 
ny, and the Music Explosion; other 
members of the cast feature Lt. Gar- 
cia’s Magical Music Box, the Teri 
Nelson Group, and the St. Louis In- 
visible Marching Band. Both innova- 
vations are heralded by LP’s just on 
the market. Silver Apples can be heard 
on Kapp’s LP and a single (“Oscilla- 
ticns/Whirly Bird”); and the “orig- 
inal cast” album for the Kasenetz-Katz 
Singing Orchestral Circus has just 
come out on the Buddah label. 


Pigmeat Markham Reg Wilson 

in Lodi, N.J. following a tour that 
covered several colleges and showspots 
in New England. They also appeared 
on the Jerry Blavatt (Phila.) and Peter 
Martin (N.Y.) tv shows plugging their 
current Roulette side, “Sitting on a 
Plane.” . . . Melanie (Safka) to play 
the “Cousin” Bruce Morrow special 
(15) and tape a Joe Franklin Show 
while in the city. She’s currently mak- 
ing promotional appearances for her 
second Columbia single “Garden in 
the City” and “Why Didn’t My Mother 
Tell Me” both sides of which are now 
beginning to get action in several mar- 
kets across the country. . . . Reg Wil- 
son has just signed to United Artists, 
is now at Jilly’s for an engagement to 
run indefinitely. His first UA release 
is the “Allegro for Macarthur Park.” 
. . . . Marriage note: Elayne Belotz, 
administrator with CBS Records’ re- 
viewer services, wed to Stefan Barrall 
May 29. 

(Continued on page 48) 


In the mid-forties there was hardly 
more than a handful of consumer mags 
dedicated to glorifying the pop music 
scene. Downbeat, of course. And Met- 
ronome. The bibles of the big band age. 
There was also Dave Dexter’s Music 
and Rhythm, backed substantially by 
John H. Hammond. And Bob Thiele’s 
Jazz Magazine. 

The youngsters who edited those 
periodicals have since grown into mid- 
ale aged corporate giants in our indus- 
try. During the war years they were 
articulate and persuasive authors. We 
were certain, for example, that if Dave 
Dexter wasn’t there when “Pinetop 
Smith spit blood,” he was, at least, 
in the next room. We were in general 
agreement with Hammond wnen he 
suggested that “Bessie Smith was the 
greatest artist American jazz has ever 
produced.’ And nodded knowingly 
when George Frazier forecast “Nick’s 
is a small place but there are those of 
us who love it . . . and those of us, who 
in days to come will be stabbed . . . 
with a genuinely heartbreaking nostal- 
gia.” 

Hammond is now with Columbia 
Records. Dexter with Capitol. Thiele 
with Impulse (ABC). Milt Gabler, who 
ran a little jazz record shop on 52nd 
Street (and occasionally wrote book- 
lets on artists such as Jimmie Noone) 
is now a Decca exec. George Avakian, 
another “jazz hot” prophet, is yet an- 
other major label producer. Critic 
Leonard l eather has been involved in 
the production of several disk antholo- 
gies. A more recent Downbeat editor. 
Jack Tracy, now produces for Liberty. 

Almost twenty-five years after there 
are at least a hundred consumer mags 
covering contemporary music. The two 
most concinnate, it seems to us, are 
Crawdaddy, a slick format mag pub- 
lished monthly out of N.Y. and Rolling 
Stone, Jann Wenner’s San Francisco 
based bi-monthly. No small measure of 
Roiling Stone’s success is due to col- 
umnist pop-jazz dean Ralph J. Gleason 
Who contributes eloquent observations 
to each printing. Unlike G. Frazier 
(currently represented in Esquire) 
Gleason has managed to bridge the 
gaps between Goodman, Gillespie and 
Grateful Dead. He is always authorita- 
tive, usually opinionated. And most 
always right. 

The current (June 22) issue of Roll- 
ing Stone is particularly worthwhile 
because of a special report on the Los 
Angeles scene by Jerry Hopkins who 
has come up with a most definitive 
study of what’s happening here and 
now. We strongly suggest you pick 
up a copy at your local newsstand. 
And, as a preview, here are a few 
random quotes: 

“They come to L.A. to hang out, to 
organize new groups and audition at 
the Troubadour on Monday nights, to 


hole up in a canyon and write songs, 
to gig at non-union clubs for a per- 
centage of the door or merely for a 
chance to be seen. They figure if they 
are within walking or driving distance 
of a studio or pressing plant ... it is 
easier to get heard, get signed, get 
rich. Which is true (in a limited sense), 
for more acts are “discovered” or “cre- 
ated” in L.A. and more records are cut 
in L.A. than in almost all other cities 
of the world combined.” 

“Los Angeles is a strange town, 
seeming at times as if were made in 
Japan and shipped here in small parts, 
then assembled by a committee of 
capricious drunks. But it has a pull, 
an attraction that may often (if not 
always) be related to — but somehow 
a little stronger than — the record 
company and the money it represents.” 

“Los Angeles is home, today, for 
everyone from Ray Charles to Herb 
Alpert; from Tim Buckley to Don 
Ellis ; from Phil Spector to Lou Rawls ; 
from Glen Campbell to Taj Mahal; 
from Johnny Rivers to Nancy Sinatra; 
from Lee Michaels to Chad and Jere- 
my, and from Nilsson to Elvis Pres- 
ley.” 

“It is where the Rolling Stones came 
to record once upon a time and where 
the Jefferson Airplane records now. . . . 



Weston & Belafonte Herb Alpert 


It is the headquarters for the Cham- 
bers Bros., the Turtles, the Mamas and 
Papas, the Byrds, Paul Revere and the 
Raiders, Love, the Association, Canned 
Heat, the Ike and Tina Turner Revue, 
Steppenwolf, the Stone Poneys, the 
Doors, the Iron Butterfly, Clear Light 
and the United States of America.” 

Along with our grudging compliment 
(he writes too damn well) one minor 
correction to the Hopkins report — he 
suggests that Terry Melcher “has not 
yet, and probably never will, turn 
about and produce his mother.” The 
fact is that Melcher did just that 
about four years ago. A Doris Day LP 
which, incidentally, v.'as her last chart 
item. 

Add another coast label — Flick City 
Records at 6565 Sunset in Hollywood. 
We’d wild guess that the owner’s name 
is fictitious — he’s billed as Percival P. 
Pennypecker, who “has built an empire 
by manufacturing large economy size 
bras.” Initial releases feature John 
Dunn and Jimmy Ford. Related to 
Edsel? 







Who Are the Company Freaks? What Happens in Laurel Canyon? 


1 Who is the LSD Promotion Man? 

I 

In the latest issue of Rolling Stone, there is a special report on 
the Los Angeles music scene, who’s in, who’s out of it, what it is 
and what can or cannot be done about it. On sale now. Or send 
in your subscription, and we’ll send you the current issue free. 


Rolling Stone 

746 Brannan Street 

San Francisco, California 

94103 

Please enter my name for a 26 issue subscription to Rolling Stone. 
I am enclosing $5.00. Send me a free copy of the special report on 
the Los Angeles Scene. 


Name 

Address. 


City & State. 



ALSO IN THIS ISSUE: “The Missing Bob Dylan Album,” the complete 
story and a track-by-track review of a Dylan Album that will never be 
released; Mick dagger talks about the new Rolling Stones album and 
says that the Stones will go on tour again; plus the usual blistering record 
reviews, nasty letters and correspondence. Rolling Stone is the magazine of 
the rock and roll musician: John Lennon, Mick dagger, Janis Joplin, Paul 
McCartney, Grace Slick, the Grateful Dead, Mike Love, A1 Kooper, Mike 
Bloomfield all have subscriptions to ROLLING STONE. Why not you? 


44 


Cash Box — June 15, 1963 


1 





^Manufactured and distributed by RCA 


Lewis & Clarke 
Expedition 
is breaking 


Chain Around The Flowers” 

# 66-1022 


COLGEMS 


Cadet Ups Panes 
To Crown Veep 

LOS ANGELES — George Panos has 
been named vice president and general 
manager of Cadet Records’ low-priced 
subsid, Crown Records. Panos has been 
with the firm for seven years, previ- 
ously holding the post of national sales 
manager of Crown and Custom. Be- 
fore joining Cadet, he was West Coast 
sales manager for Ambassador Rec- 
ords. 



George Panos 


[D»m MOMIS 

Music In Action 


MOUNTAIN OF LOVE 
NEVER GONNA CRY 

Ronnie Dove Diamond 

FACE IT GIRL, IT'S OVER 

Nancy Wilson Capitol 

MR. SANDMAN 

Bert Kaempfert Decca 

THAT'S ALL RIGHT, YOU'RE 
IN LOVE 

YOU'RE MY LITTLE BABY 

The Furys Diamond 


MR. SANDMAN 
Sounds of Samaroo 


RCA 


I WON'T CRY IF YOU WALK 
AWAY 

I LOVE NO ONE BUT YOU 

The Violets Diamond 

ALL I DREAM 
I LIKE THE WAY IT FEELS 

Estelle Levitt mgm 

MAMAM 

Arthur Prysock Verve 

YOU MAY BE TOO MUCH FOR 
MEMPHIS, BABY 
Paul Hampton Dunhill 

I LOVE YOU TO LOVE ME 

Tony Gafo Capitol 

MORNING FIRE 
OZ LEE EAVES DROPS 

The Other Half Acta 



PHIL KAHL, Exec. Vice President 


Knighf Named To 
Columbia A&R Slot 

NEW YORK — Columbia Records has 
appointed Sonny Knight associate 
producer of west coast A&R, it has 
been reported by Jack Gold, vice presi- 
dent of A&R for the diskery. 



Sonny Knight 


Knight, in his new capacity, will be 
based in Hollywood and will be respon- 
sible to Gold. He will produce record- 
ings by Gordon Alexander, among 
other artists. 

Most recently head of the A&R de- 
partment for Mira Productions, Knight 
joins the Columbia staff with over 
twelve years of diversified experience 
in the music and recording industry. 
While working as an independent pro- 
ducer, Knight was responsible for 
recording the chart hit “Something’s 
Got a Hold on Me” by Don and Allene 
Cole. 

Knight has also worked as music 
director for several radio stations, in- 
cluding KENO in Las Vegas, KRIZ 
in Phoenix, and KTLN in Denver. 


Eaton, Wilson Added 
To Laurie Prod. Staff 

NEW YORK — Gene Schwartz, A&R 
man with Laurie Records, announced 
the addition of Joe Wilson and Walter 
Eaton of the Classics IV (recently 
charted with “Spooky”) to the pro- 
duction staff of the label. 

Eaton and Wilson, based out of 
Jacksonville, Fla., are currently comb- 
ing the Southeast for talent. 



CLASSIC OCCASION — Norman Ra- 
cusin, division vice president and gen- 
eral manager of RCA Records, mounts 
the podium to greet Eugene Ormandy 
and the Philadelphia Orchestra follow- 
ing the first recording made under a 
new long-term agreement with the 
label. This is the first RCA session for 
the Philadelphia Orchestra under mu- 
sical director Ormandy in 25 years, 
and it was the first time since 1960 
that they waxed in the ensemble’s 
home at the Philadelphia Academy of 
Music. Work to be featured on the 
first release under the new label con- 
tract is Tchaikovsky’s “Pathetique” 
Symphony (#6), which was the first 
recording made when Ormandy joined 
the Philadelphia Orchestra and RCA 
in 1936. 


Un-New Sound From West 
To Make Epic Premiere 

NEW YORK — A new San Francisco 
bay area group has blossomed with 
their own kind of “not new” sound. 
Simply called West, the team offers an 
approach that is called by spokesman 
Jon Sagen “basically lyric, warm and 
natural.” 

The reason behind turning to this 
anti-new music style was expressed by 
Sagen: “I think ‘pop/rock’ music is re- 
turning to a more lyric, warm trend, 
away from the loud crashing “psyche- 
delic/blues’ bag it has been in. None 
of us has ever been much interested in 
making a lot of noise or in playing 
loud.. Loudness always seems to 
trample feelings to a pulp, and feeling 
is most important to us. As for the 
blues, we seldom play them because we 
seldom have them.” 

Recently pacted to Epic Records, the 
West will be heard from with a single 
coupling “Just Like Tom Thumb’s 
Blues” with “Baby You Been On My 
Mind.” An album is also completed 
and will be unveiled at the label’s na- 
tional sales convention in Las Vegas 
next week. 

The team’s sound is derived from 
various influences. Lead guitarist Ron 
Cornelius and bassist Joe Davis have 
played together in rock and country 
bands; Mike Stewart, rhythm guitar, 
grew up playing and singing folk 
music; Drummer Lloyd Perata ap- 
peared with rock combos; Bob Claire, 
who plays several instruments and 
does the arrangements, worked in big 
bands and jazz groups before joining 
West; and Sagen played trombone and 
trumpet in Dixieland acts. 

According to Len Levy, Epic’s vp of 
sales and distribution, “the group does 
not have a new sound, but expresses 
feelings with a pleasant, melodic style. 
At a time when people in our industry 
are waiting for the next ‘new’ sound to 
appear, one thing remains constant — 
the ever present popularity of a lyric 
melody which is what the West is all 
about.” 

Levy also noted that the label is de- 
veloping extensive plans for promotion 
and exploitation on a national basis. 
These plans will be described at the 
sales meetings next week. 



NARAS Elects 5 

LOS ANGELES— The board of gover- 
nors of the L.A. chapter of NARAS, 
the awards association, elected the fol- 
lowing officers at their meeting last 
Wed. (9) : Irving Townsend, presi- 
dent; Stan Kenton, 1st vice president; 
Barry DeVorzon, 2nd vice president; 
Anita Kerr, secretary; Sid Feller, 
treasurer. 


Col LP Spurge 

(Continued from page 7) 

Other gold record winners shoiwing 
up as best-selling albums are Bob 
Dylan’s “John Wesley Harding” and 
“Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits.” Contem- 
porary rock groups are placing in the 
listings with albums by Moby Grape, 
The Electric Flag, Blood, Sweat and 
Tears, The Chambers, Gary Puckett 
and The Union Gap, and Spirit. Gary 
Puckett and The Union Gap have two 
albums charted in the Top 100, “Wom- 
an, Woman” and “Young Girl.” The 
label’s “Rock Machine” promo cam- 
paign launched earlier this year is 
credited with playing a major part 
in exposing Columbia’s roster of rock 
artists to consumers. 

In the popular-music field, Colum- 
bia’s strength is clearly in evidence by 
the continuing popularity of artists 
such as Andy Williams, whose latest 
Columbia album, “Honey,” is in the 
Top 100; Johnny Mathis, with his 
high-ranking LP “Love Is Blue”; Patti 
Page, with “Today My Way”; and 
Ray Conniff, with his Columbia LP’s 
“It Must Be Him” and “Honey” both 
included on the chart. 

The success of the label’s “Welcome 
to Columbia Country” promotion cam- 
paign is also being felt as Johnny 
Cash’s latest album, “Johnny Cash at 
Folsom Prison,” enters into the Top 
100 album category. 



WIN, PLACE, SHOW AND . . .—Of- 
fering a first prize of one color tv. 
Universal Distributors of Philadelphia'?' 
ran a window display contest in con- 
junction with A&M’s “Herb Alpert>'- 
Month.” Above are four of the lead- 
ing choices considered in the finals-^^ 
the one with two ladies being the 
grand prize 'winner. Top award winner 
was John Oros of Boscovs Records in 
Reading, Pa. Others in the running for^ 
the color tv, which wei’e in at the fi-"^ 
nals included: the Spruce Record Shop 
in Scranton, Pa. (2nd from top), Renn’^-i 
Records of Philadelphia, and (bottom 
photo) E. J. Korvette in Audubon, N.J.*^ 


AKS Talent Drive •!* 

ST. LOUIS — Ken Keene, president of 
AKS & Associates, has announced 
talent drive to recruit and promote St. 
Louis area talent. AKS has recentl.N T"' 
signed several St. Louis acts to per- 
sonal management contracts, among 
them singer-writer John Michaels and 
Cheshire Fountain. Also on the firm’s^^^ 
talent roster are Johnny Soul (Dome 
Records), Lee Rose (Paula), Narvel , 
Felts (Hi) and Bob & Sal (Pik). The-^ 
Rock Revival, set for their first Cana- ^ 
dian tour in Mid-July, are currently iii*^' 
label negotiations. 


46 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 








Liberty Sets June For Johnny Mann Promo 


LOS ANGELES — Liberty Records is 
saluting Johnny Mann on his i2th 
year with the label by naming June 
as Johnny Mann Month and launching 
an all out advertising and promotion 
campaign, according to the label’s gen- 
eral manager, Bud Dain. 

More than 1500 radio stations have 
agreed to participate in a special sa- 
lute scheduled for June 19, which has 
been designated Johnny Mann Day, 
and are being serviced with a special 
sampler LP, an open end interview and 
special radio station promos by Mann. 


Also scheduled for June 19 is a 
special appearance by Mann and the 
Johnny Mann Singers on the Joey 
Bishop Show, for which Mann is musi- 
cal director. The group will perform 
selections from their new set, “This 
Guy’s In Love With You,’’ skedded 
for June release. 

“The phenomenal response we have 
received from everyone, especially the 
radio stations, is but another indica- 
tion of why Johnny Mann has been 
such a giant in the record industry for 
the last 12 years,” said Liberty nation- 
al promotion manager Dennis Ganim. 



BUT IT’S SUNNY NOW— “Yesterday 
I Heard the Rain” composer Armando 
Manzanero is in New York on a visit 
to the RCA Victor headquarters which 
handle his recordings for international 
release. The Mexican singer-pianist- 
songviTiter also stopped by the Cash 
Box offices where he told of seeing 
Tony Bennett perform at the Copa, 
highlighting the show with his latest 
single of Mr. Manzanero’s song. The 
original “Esta Tarde Vi Llover” is in- 
cluded in his album: “Armando Man- 
zanero & His Songs.” With him in the 
photo above are Enrique Zamora, man- 
ager of RCA Mexicana’s international 
department; and (left) Hector Almide, 
Manzanero’s agent. 


McHugh To Channel 
As Sales Manager 

NEW YORK — The appointment of 
Joseph A. McHugh as sales manager 
of Channel Marketing, the tape cart 
and cassette manufacturers, has been 
announced by Ronald Obsgarten, pres- 
ident of the firm. 

McHugh comes to Channel after 
two-and-a-half years with TelePro 
Industries, where he was sales man- 
ager, and brings with him 19 years 
experience in the newspaper field. He 
will be headquartered at the firm’s 
New York Office. 

“We’re pleased to have Mr. McHugh 
on our sales team,” said Arnold Kami- 
ner, executive vice president of Chan- 
nel. “He is fully acquainted with our 
market and will be of great assistance 
to our growing list of customers.” 


Goff A Dad Again 

NEW YORK— Sam Goff, vp of Scep- 
ter Records, became a father for the 
second time when his wife, Mary Jane, 
gave birth to a boy, David Robert, at 
New York University Hospital on 
May 25. It’s the second boy for the 
couple. Older lad is Barry, aged 2. 


Surgery For Finley 

NEW YORK — Larry Finley, president 
of International Tape Cartridge Corp., 
was scheduled to undergo major sur- 


gery last Friday (7) at Cedars of 
Lebanon Hospital in Los Angeles. He 
was taken ill while on a visit to the 
city. 



WHISTLE STOPPING—Monkee Mike Nesmith was guest of honor at a recep- 
tion kicking off release of his “Wichita Train Whistle Sings” LP just sent out 
by Dot Records. In this set, Nesmith utilized 57 of Hollywood’s leading musi- 
cians, and had arrangements done by Shorty Rogers. Top photo shows Nesmith 
(center) with Dot veep & g.m. Dick Peirce (left) and Arnold Burk, Paramount 
Pictures’ v.p. in charge of music and president of Dot. Below: Nesmith is 
greeted by (1. to r.) Dot publicity director Norm Winter, ad merchandising 
head Jack Levy, promoman Bobby Applegate, sales director Ken Revercomb 
and Cash Box’ Hollywood rep Harvey Geller. 


Tetragrammaton Nantes 
Loddengaard To VP Post 

BEVERLY HILLS — Arthur Mogull, 
president of Tetragrammaton Rec- 
ords, has appointed Linda Lodden- 
gaard vice president in charge of busi- 
ness affairs for the label. Miss Lodden- 
gaard handled similar duties for Tet- 
ragrammaton’s parent company, The 
Campbell, Silver, Cosby Corp., though 
not in an executive capacity. 

Previous to her association with 
CSC, Miss Loddengaard functioned as 
general manager of Riverside Records. 


Peck Gives Fee To MPTPF 

LOS ANGELES — Film star Gregory 
Peck, set by London Records to nar- 
rate its “Lincoln Portrait” LP, will 
contribute his $1,000 fee to the Motion 
Picture and Television Relief Fund. 
George Bagnall, president of the Fund, 
stated: “At a time when the demands 
upon the MPTRF are the greatest in 
our history, we especially welcome 
such generous and thoughtful acts as 
this one of Gregory Peck’s. We sin- 
cerely hope it will set an example for 
other stars who are involved from time 
to time in similar activities.” 


RECORD RAMBLINGS 

(Continued from page 44) 

NEW YORK 

Kim Weston has been selected by Har- 
ry Belafonte to accompany him on his 
annual summer tour which will reach 
7 American and 4 Canadian cities this 
year. Beginning June 10 in Seattle, 
the concert tour will run through Aug. 
27. The unusual thing about his choice 
is that Belafonte usually selects a com- 
parative newcomer to join his show; 
but he signed Miss Weston after see- 
ing a recent performance in Detroit. 
She has just had a “This Is America” 
LP on MGM . . . Phil Kahl exuberant 
at E. H. Morris with the current out- 
burst of pubbery action on recordings 
by Ronnie Dove (“Mountain of Love”), 
Nancy Wilson (“Face It Girl, It’s 
Over”). Bert Kaempfert’s revival of 
“Mr. Sandman” and a series of other 
new action clickers. . . . Lionel Hamp- 
ton and orchestra have opened at the 
Riverboat in a show marking the 
nightspot’s 3d Anniversary. ... No 
blood relation, the Hampton Institute 
(Hampton, Va.) holds a centennial 
celebration highlighted by a three- 
concert jazz series (27-29) in coopera- 
tion with the Newport Jazz Festival. 
Dionne Warwick, Wes Montgomery, 
Cannonball Adderly, Thelonius Monk, 
Herbie Mann and Archie Shepp make 
up the Friday night bill. Saturday eve- 
ning features Nina Simone, Count 
Basie, Ramsey Lewis, Dizzy Gillespie, 
Jimmy Smith and Gary Burton. . . • 
Bobby Vinton receiving standing ova- 
tions at the Latin Quarter, he’ll be 
followed at the club by Brenda Lee. . . . 
Bobby Goldsboro, over 2 mil with 
“Honey,” to guest star on the new 
“Showcase ’68” show (18). . . . Four 
programs have been lined up to benefit 
Daytop Village, the State Island re- 
habilitation community for ex-narcotic 
addicts. At the site, Pete Seeger & 
Janis Ian will appear for the first night 
(14); jazz is spotlighted on the 15th 
with Billy Taylor, Thad Jones, Mel 
Lewis, Kenny Burrell and others ; Latin 
and rock are the key to the third date 
at Daytop emceed by Steve Paul; and 
a special benefit will be staged at the 
Village Gate with Duke Ellington, 
Clark Terry, David Amram, Art Farm- 
er, Jackie McClean, Donald Byrd, and 
more. . . . Richard Simon of MB Rec- 
ords is now putting together a show 
of MB/Downeast acts to play the 
wards at St. Alban’s Naval Hospital. 
He started the entertainment planning 
after a visit to the military hospital 
during the Memorial Day weekend; 
and has also urged that records be 
sent to the Red Cross there for the 
injured Vietnam vets. 


SESAC*s Myers To Continent f 

NEW YORK— W. F. Myers, director^ 
of international activities at SESAC..i.i* 
the licensing organization, is current- 
ly on an extended tour of Europe, vis- 
iting the firm’s reps, sub-publishers 
and music users in twelve countries on 
the continent. ^ 

Included in his itinerary are stops in 
Frankfurt, Munich, Lisbon, Madrid,^ 
Rome, Zurich, Stockholm, Paris and 
London. 


George Lindsey's First 
Capitol LP, New TV'er 
To Bow In Same Week 

LOS ANGELES — “Goober Sings,” the** 
first Capitol Records album by George 
Lindsey, co-star on the popular TVv' 
series, “The Andy Griffith Show,” for 
the past four years, will be released 
the same week in September that his 
new CBS-TV series, “Mayberry R.F. 
D.,” will debut. 

Both Capitol and CBS will join 
forces in sending Lindsey on a cross- 
country tour on which he will jointly » 
plug both the album and the series. ■ 
The tour is presently scheduled to 
start in late August and end up in 
New York for television appearances 
the week the new series premieres. 


CHICAGO ,, 

The fourth annual “Summer Of 
Stars” concert series, presented by 
Triangle Theatrical Productions’ 
Frank Fried, gets underway July 12-13 
with Ravi Shanker headlining a festi- 1 
val of Indian music in the Auditorium ^ 
Theater. Next will be Judy Collins and 
Arlo Guthrie in the Opera Hou^e 
19-20), followed by Jack Jones and 
comedian Pat Paulsen (7/27-28); The 
Four Seasons (8/2-3), Wilson Pickett 
and Mitch Ryder (8/9), The Associa- 
tion (8/10-11), Dionne Warwick and-<‘ 
Herbie Mann (8/16) and Harry Bela- 
fonte (8/21 thru 8/25) Mobie Rec- ^ 

ords prexy Jim Manning tells us The 
Iron Gate, who are propping for their 
first p.a. tour of the East, are making 
much headway with their label bow 
“Get Ready.” Deck’s reportedly hap- 
pening in Wis-Mich-Ill-Iowa-Neb-Co- 
lorado! . . . Sarah Vaughn and comedy 
team. The Times Square Two, come in 
June 17 for a two-weeker in Mister 
Kelly’s. . . . Summit’s Bud Stebbins is 
plugging the new Donovan deck “Hur- . 
dy Gurdy Man” (Epic), “Story Of 
Rock & Roll” by The Turtles (White 
Whale) and “Grazing In The Grass” 
by Hugh Masekela (Uni). . . . The 
Soulful Strings begin a month’s en- 
gagement in London House next week. 

. . . The Curtain Calls, who recently 
signed a Dot pact, opened in the Conti- 
nental Plaza’s Cantina Lounge. Also 
on the bill is femme duo The Livin’ 
Dolls. ... Nice to meet Steed hitmaker 
Andy Kim, who spent some time in Chi 
last week making the rounds with 
promo man Erwin Barg. He’s currently 
soaring with “How’d We Ever Get This y 
Way” and will soon have an album 
released. In fact, work on said album > 
necessitated postponement of his orig- 
inal trip here. . . . A1 Curtis of Ben | 
Arden Associates items that The 
Growin’ Concern (Mainstream) have a 
series of local p.a.’s lined up for them, 
climaxed by an appearance at the Int’l. 
Teen Princess Party. . . . The Cherry 
People (Heritage) will be feted by 
Metro Record Dist. at a cocktail party 
in the Continental Plaza Hotel on ■' 
Tuesday (11). . . . Promo man Deek 
Adkins (Summit) info’s that the new 
Hugh Masekela deck “Grazing In The 
Grass” (Uni) is enjoying heavy r&b 
programming here! . . . Topping the 
United Record Dist. plug list is the a 
Shorty Long version of “Here Comes 
The Judge” (Soul), Carl Carlton’s 
“Competition Ain’t Nothing” (Back 
Beat), “I Don’t Care” by Cookie Scott 
& The Shevelles (Orr) and “You Won’t 
Get Away” by Fran Oliver (BBS) .... 
wind’s Benson and Russell hosted 
1600 people to the local premiere of 
“The Odd Couple” at the United Art- 
ists Theater. 


48 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 



THE TOYS 

^‘SEALED WITH A KISS'^ 

THEIR BRAND NEW SMASH ON MUSICOR RECORDS 

A most unusual performance of a great song 



Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


Taient On Singe 


A 




BOBBY VINTON 


LATIN QUARTER, N. Y. — Bobby 
Vinton was in his element on opening 
night at the Latin Quarter. He sang 
and “Oh Yea’d” his way into the 
hearts of a packed, mostly tourist 
house, which couldn’t seem to get 
enough of the Kurly-headed Kid or his 
dreamy ballads. 

Vinton brightened the spirits of the 
highly involved opening night crowd. 
From his opening medley, served 
whilst touring the audience, to his 
show-closer, “Gotta Travel On,” his 
communication with his audience was 
almost tangible. 

His repertoire seemed to encompass 
every tune that’s ever decorated the 
Most Wanted list, ranging from the 
greenest of evergreens to the ripest of 
plums from current harvests (includ- 
ing a well-timed international smor- 
gasbord). The latter included a tour 
of European musicdom, with stopovers 
in Italy, France (“A Man And A 
Woman”), Poland (an unpronouncea- 
ble, but lively polka) and even a visit 
to Israel (“Hava Nagilah”). 


Naturally the bill was also spiced 
with a choice sampling from the vast 
reservoir of Vinton super-sellers, 
which included the well-remembered 
“Mr. Lonely,” “Roses Are Red” and 
“Blue Velvet,” among others. From 
the Broadway scene came another 
medley — featuring a dab of “George 
M” (“Over There” and “Give My Re- 
gards To Broadway”) and a dash of 
“How Now, Dow Jones” (“Step To 
The Rear”). 

One of the high points of a Vinton 
performance is his “Mama Don’t Al- 
low” routine, where he shows his ver- 
satility not only as a singer but as an 
accomplished musician as well. Be- 
tween vocal choruses Vinton switches 
from singer to trumpeter, from trum- 
peter to saxophonist and from saxo- 
phonist to clarinetist, and then back 
to his most recognized role as song 
stylist. 

One thing is certain about Vinton’s 
opening at the Latin Quarter — the 
fans who picked up their tabs at the 
end of the evening considered the 
money well spent. 


GORDON LIGHTFOOT— RAUN McKINNON 


BITTER END, N. Y. — Canadian 
singer / songwriter / guitarist Gordon 
Lightfoot came into New York last 
week to fulfill an engagement at the 
Bitter End nitery in Greenwich Vil- 
lage. We saw him on opening night, 
Wednesday (5). 

Lightfoot is one of the most talented 
contemporary songwriters around. His 
best songs (“Early Morning Rain,” 
“Steel Rail Blues,” “That’s What You 
Get For Loving Me” and “The Long 
River” are prime examples) have 
pure, folk-styled melodies and lyrics, 
and they move with a strong but 
graceful rhythm that has become one 
of his trademarks. 

The words “strong” and “graceful” 
may also be used to describe Light- 
foot as a performer. Both rugged and 
youthful, he sings and plays guitar 
(both six and twelve string) with 
finely controlled energy. Red Shea 


(lead guitar) and John Stockfish (bass 
guitar), both excellent musicians, 
blend the sounds of their instruments 
so tightly with Lightfoot’s that the 
total sound seems to be coming from 
one instrument. When Lightfoot, Shea 
and Stockfish perform a song like 
“Early Morning Rain,” the excitement 
can reach a pretty high level. 

Lightfoot may be heard on disks 
via his United Artists albums. 

Preceding Lightfoot on Wednesday 
night was another talented singer/ 
songwriter /guitarist, a young lady 
named Raun McKinnon, who records 
for Kapp Records. Miss McKinnon 
sings soft ballads and spirited blues 
with equal skill, and often intricate 
guitar work is very expert. Her songs, 
which, like Lightfoot’s, have a folk 
flavor, are well written, and she could 
develop into a writer of considerable 
stature. 



PEER-LESS — Jackie Paris and Ann 
Marie Morse have joined the roster of 
Peer-Southern Productions. Paris, pre- 
viously with ABC Records, has won 
Downbeat, Playboy and Metronome 
male vocalist awards. Miss Morse was 
a Canadian TV performer, and won 
the Toronto Telegram female vocalist 
poll three years straight before com- 
ing to the States to sing with the 
Maynard Ferguson and Kay Winding 
outfits. 

The pair will record singly and to- 
gether as vocalists, and Paris is slated 
for an LP as a guitar soloist. The pair 
is shown with P-S assistant profes- 
sional manager Del Serino (1), relax- 
ing after the contract signings. 


Columbia Adds Two 
To Hall oi Fame 

NEW YORK — Columbia Records has 
released two new records in its Hall 
of Fame series. 

“Lew Leslie’s Blackbirds of 1928,” 
(OL 6770), is the only available re- 
cording of the famous all-Negro musi- 
cal revues which fiourished in the 20 ’s, 
and this version, with 518 perform- 
ances, was the longest-running show 
of this type. The Jimmy McHugh- 
Dorothy Fields score, which introduced 
“I Can’t Give You Anything But Love” 
and “Diga Diga Do,” was recorded in 
1932 by Jack Kapp, then recording 
director at Brunswick, with only two 
members of the original cast, Adelaide 
Hall and Bill Robinson. Ethel Waters, 
the Mills Brothers, Cab Calloway, the 
Cecil Mack Choir and the orchestras 
of Duke Ellington and Don Redman 
were added on the date. 

“Ballads and Breakdowns of the 
Golden Era,” recorded by Columbia in 
the late 20’s and early 30’s, will be the 
first country album to be released as 
part of the Hall of Fame series. The 
album, literally a history of early 
country music, features the Skillet 
Dickers, the Tar Heel Rattlers and the 
Roane County Ramblers, among 
others. Emphasis is on banjo and 
fiddle, since the guitar was quite un- 
known in the mountains before the 
early 20 ’s. 


MARTHA REEVES & THE VANDELLAS 


COPACABANA, N. Y. — Some groups 
have to wait a long time for a shot at 
stardom, and when the chance comes 
they blow it. Gordy’s Martha Reeves 
& the Vandellas have waited for four 
long years, picking up 15 hits (includ- 
ing a few #1 songs) along the way, 
and when their chance came, they 
were more than ready. Their opening 
at the famed Copacabana was one of 
the most exciting events we’ve seen in 
a long time. 

Backed up by the Copa band (which 
sounded unusually good), augmented 
by a Motown-provided rhythm section, 
with the whole works under the direc- 
tion of Motown’s Maurice King, the 
group came on like a heat wave. 
Getting right into the thick of things 
with a medley of four of their hits, 
“I’m Ready For Love” (which started 
the Vandella’s rebirth last year), 
“Come And Get These Memories,” 
“Quicksand” and “Heat Wave,” 
Martha & co. followed up with a com- 
plete version of “Nowhere To Run.” 
Two more medleys showed the girls 
at their most professional, adult- 
pleasing form: “Love Makes Me Do 
Foolish Things” (a B side of a very 


minor hit which has become more 
popular than most of their big hits) '*<• 
smoothly blended into “L-O-V-E” and 
“Love Can Be A Moments Madness”; ^ 
“The Girl From Ipanema,” “Call Me” 
and “Look Of Love” seemed to be one 
song as Martha skillfully weaved the 
lyrics around the common music. ^,4 

The uptempo “My Baby Loves Me” 
set the stage for a nice bit of humor- ^ 
ous interchange between the girls to 
introduce “Honey Chile.” Martha took 
the solo spotlight for a haunting first 
chorus of “Our Day Will Come,” ac- 
companied by guitarist Dave Knight, 
and the song move uptempo as the 
group joined in for the last chorus. • 
Two spirituals, especially apt consider- 
ing the tragic events of the last few ^ 
days, were well received by the audi- 
ence. Because of the response, an extra 
song, “I Promise To Wait My Love” 
(groups recent chart item) was added 
to the set before Martha Reeves and 
the Vandellas wound up, to loud audi- 
ence participation, with “Dancing In ^ 
The Streets.” Audience gave the group 
a standing ovation, a tribute they well ^ 
deserved. 


JONI MITCHELL— HEDGE & DONNA ! 


THE TROUBADOUR, HOLLYWOOD 
~Joni Mitchell, a singer and a com- 
poser from Saskatchewan with long 
golden hair and a voice which can only 
be compared to those of Joan Baez 
and Judy Collins, enchanted an open- 
ing night audience with her poetry 
and the purity of her singing. 

Although she has been active for 
several years on the Canadian folk 
scene, this was Miss Mitchell’s local 
night club debut. 

Her repertoire includes songs from 
her recently released album on Re- 
prise, numbers such as “Nathan La 
Franeer,” “Marcie” and “I Had a 
King,” in addition to later composi- 
tions. 

Among her songs which have been 
adopted by other performers are 
“Michael From Mountains” and “Both 
Sides Now” (Judy Collins), “The 
Circle Game” (Ian and Sylvia) and 
“Chelsea Morning” and “Clouds” 
(Dave van Ronk) . 

Miss Mitchell’s writing is sensitive 
and delicate : each song is a short 
story, miniature novel or philosophi- 
cal observation set in graceful poetry 


and beautiful melodies. She frag- ^4 
ments words and images into multiple 
meanings, sneaking in literary word 
plays such as “Cart wheels turn to car 
wheels” and “Midway down the Mid- 
way.” 

Her voice surpasses the challenge of 
her lyrics, soaring through and ex- ■# 
ploring her fra^le words and melo- 
dies with incredible ease against the ’ 
subtle accompaniment of her acoustic 
guitar. Miss Mitchell is unquestion- 
ably a major artist. 

Also on the Troubadour bill were 
Hedge and Donna, a folk duo repre- 
sented by a recent album from Capitol. ^ 

Both sing well — original material 
and songs of singers such as Tim 
Buckley, and Nina Simone. 

Hedge plays acoustic 12-string gui- 
tar, an instrument which causes him 
occasional tuning difficulties. Donna 
plays tambourine. They are backed by 
an electric bass guitar and a conga 
player. 

Most of their vocal efforts are of- 
fered with tight dual voicings, though 
both also demonstrated impressive 
solo ability during their set. 




N. Y. UNDERGROUND 


FILMORE EAST, N. Y. — MOBY 
GRAPE, FUGS, GARY BURTON 
QUARTET. Columbia artist’s Moby 
Grape headlined 4 shows at the East 
Village theatre last weekend. They 
presented a polished act, with none of 
the usual delays for ‘tuning up.’ Dur- 
ing the hour they were on, not one 
member of the group acknowledged 
the audience. They were, except for 
some fine singing, completely silent. 
Although it would be nice to know 
what songs were being performed, the 
lack of info did not seriously detract 
from an excellent performance. The 
Fugs, now with Reprise, also are a 
strong act, and their vulgarity did not 
bother the audience. They augmented 
their regular act with extra studio 
musicians, but a pseudo-conductor 
managed to keep the show flowing 
smoothly. RCA’s Gary Burton jazz/ 
rock group was reviewed recently. 


CAFE AU GO GO, N.Y. 

CANNED HEAT 

Liberty’s Canned Heat opened the 
newly redecorated & restyled Cafe Au 
Go Go for a week’s run. The room has 
excellent instrumental acoustics, but ^ 
the kinks have not been worked out of 
the mike system. The new ‘Cafe-in- ' - 
the-round’ set-up did not add or de- 
tract from the performance of Canned 
Heat. With ex-Blood, Sweat & Tears 
organist A1 Kooper sitting in, the 
group managed to squeeze 4 songs in- 
to their hour show. Canned Heat is ^ 
one of the best jazz-based blues 
groups around, but they did not really 
get warmed up until the last two num- 
bers. Then they were excellent. Their 
closing song, “Fried Hockey Boogie,” ** 
showed the group as individuals, as 
each member, including Keeper, took 
a solo. They’re all good, and so is 
Canned Heat. 


50 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 



“In this difficult day, in this difficult time 
for the United States, it is perhaps well to 
ask what kind of nation we are, what direction 
we want to move in. 

. . . You can be filled with bitterness, and hatred 
and a desire for revenge. We can move in that 
direction as a country-and greater polarization: 
black people amongst black, white amongst white, 
filled with hatred toward one another. Or we can 
make an effort, as Martin Luther King did, to 
understand and to comprehend and replace that 
violence, that stain of bloodshed that has spread 
across our land, with an effort to understand, 
compassion and love.” 

Robert F. Kennedy 

on the death of Martin Luther King 


it’s the 

summer smash! 
take a ride with 

THE PEPPERMINT TROllEV COMPANY 


on 



Acta Records, distributed nationally by Dot Records, a division of Paramount Pictures Corporation, 1507 North Vine Street, Hollywood, California 90028 


52 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 



1 BOOKENDS 

Simon & Garfunkel (Columbia KCS 9529) 1 

2 THE BEAT OF THE BRASS 

Herb Alpert & Tijuana Brass (A&M-SP 4146) 2 

3 THE GRADUATE 

Original Soundtrack (Columbia OS 3180) 3 

4 THE BIRDS THE BEES & 

THE MONKEES 

(Colgems C0M/C03 109) 4 

5 HONEY 

Bobby Goldsboro (United Artists UAS 6642) 6 

6 PARSLEY, SAGE, ROSEMARY & 

THYME 

Simon & Garfunkel (Columbia CL 2563/CS 9363) 5 

LOOK AROUND 

Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66 (A&M SP 4137) 9 

A TRAMP SHINING 

Richard Harris (Dunhill DS 50032) 17 

GOD BLESS TINY TIM 

(Reprise RS 6292) 20 

10 DISRAELI GEARS 

Cream (Atco 232/3D 232) 10 

11 PAPAS & MAMAS 

(Dunhill DS 50031) 11 

12 BIRTHDAY 

The Association (Warner Bros. /Seven Arts W3 1733) 7 

13 THE GOOD, THE BAD, 

AND THE UGLY 

Original Soundtrack (United Artists UAL 4172/UAS 5172) 8 

14 WOW 

Moby Grape (Columbia CXS 3) 14 

15 MUSIC FROM FISTFUL OF 
DOLLARS ETC. 

Hugo Montenegro (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3927) 12 

I WISH IT WOULD RAIN 

Temptations (Gordy GS 927) 23 

17 LADY SOUL 

Aretha Franklin (Atlantic 8167/SD 8167) 21 

1 8 BLOOMING HITS 

Paul Mauriat (Philips PHM 200-248/PH3 600-248) 15 

19 THE UNICORN 

Irish Rovers (Decca DL 4951 /DLS 74951) 13 

20 TO RUSSELL, MY BROTHER, 

WHOM I SLEPT WITH 

Bill Cosby (Warner Bros. /Seven Arts WS 1734) 16 

21 ARE YOU EXPERIENCED 

Jimi Hendrix Experience (Reprise R/RS 6261) 22 

22 BONNIE AND CLYDE 

(Warner Bros. /Seven Arts WS 1742) 18 

23 HEY, LITTLE ONE 

Glen Campbell (Capitol ST 2848) 26 

24 REFLECTIONS 

Diana Ross & The Supremes (Motown MS 665) 19 

25 SOUNDS OF SILENCE 

Simon & Garfunkel (Columbia CL 2469/CS 8269) 24 

26 WHO WILL ANSWER? 

Ed Ames (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3961) 25 

LOVE IS BLUE 

Johnny Mathis (Columbia CS 9637) 35 

28 GOIN' OUT OF MY HEAD 

Lettermen (Capitol ST 2865) 27 

29 THE DOCK OF THE BAY 

OHs Redding (Volt S-419) 28 

HONEY 

Andy Williams (Columbia CS 9662) 84 

31 A LONG TIME COMIN' 

Electric Flag (Columbia CS 9597) 31 

32 VALLEY OF THE DOLLS 

Dionne Warwick (Scepter SPS 568) 29 

YOUNG GIRL 

Gary Puckett & The Union Gap (Columbia CS 9664) 42 


30 

43 


34 TIGHTEN UP 

Archie Bell & The Drells (Atlantic CS 8181) 39 

35 A PORTRAIT OF RAY 

Ray Charles (Tangerine ABCS 625) 36 

36 STEVIE WONDER'S GREATEST 
HITS 

(Tamla TS 282) 37 

37 VINCEBUS ERUPTUM 

Blue Cheer (Philips PHM 200-264/PWS 600-264 33 

38 JUNGLE BOOK 

Original Soundtrack (Disneyland M/S 2948) 

39 DR. ZHIVAGO 

Original Soundtrack (MGM E/ES 6 ST) 

DEAN MARTIN'S GREATEST HITS 
VOL. 1 

(Reprise RS 6301) 65 

41 ONCE UPON A DREAM 

Rascals (Atlantic 8169/SD 8169) 34 

42 CAMELOT 

Original Soundtrack (Warner Bros. B/BS 1712) 47 

43 SOUND OF MUSIC 

Original Soundtrack (RCA Victor LOCD/LOSD 2005) 51 

44 DOWN HERE ON THE GROUND 

Wes Montgomery (A&M LP 3006) 44 

45 MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR 

Beatles (Capitol MAL/SMAL 2835) 40 

46 ROTARY CONNECTION 

(Cadet Concept LP/LPS 312) 38 

47 AXIS: BOLD AS LOVE 

Jimi Hendrix Experience (Reprise RS 6281) 32 

48 ELVIS' GOLD RECORDS VOL. 4 

(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3921) 46 

49 HONEY 

Ray Connitf (Columbia CS 9661) 54 

50 LIKE TO GET TO KNOW YOU 

Spanky & Our Gang (Mercury SR 61161) 50 

51 CRY LIKE A BABY 

Box Tops (Bell 6017) 55 

52 ELECTRIFYING EDDIE HARRIS 

(Atlantic (SD) 1495) 59 

53 JOHN WESLEY HARDING 

Bob Dylan (Columbia CL 2804/CS 9604) 52 

54 DIANA ROSS & THE SUPREMES 
GREATEST HITS 

(Motown M/MS 2-663) 57 

55 LOVE IS BLUE 

AI Martino (Capitol ST 2908) 61 

56 LETTERMEN . . . AND LIVE 

(Capitol T/ST 2758) 45 

57 GEORGE M! 

Original Broadway Cast (Columbia KOS 3200) 60 

58 THE BEAT GOES ON 

Vanilla Fudge (Atco 237/SO 237) 41 

59 LOVE IS ALL AROUND 

Troggs (Fontana SRF 67576) 56 

60 NANCY & LEE 

Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazlewood Reprise RS 6273) 49 

61 BY THE TIME I GET TO PHOENIX 

Glen Campbell (Capitol T/ST 2851) 62 

62 LOVE IS BLUE 

Claudine Longet (A&M SP 4142) 53 

63 FORTUOSITY 

Mills Bros. (Dot DLPS 25835) 58 

64 THE DOORS 

(Elektra EK 4007 EKS 7407) 69 

MAURIAT MAGIC 

Paul Mauriat (Philips 600-270) — 

66 ULTIMATE SPINACH 

(MGM SE 4518) 66 

67 I CAN'T STAND MYSELF 

James Brown (King 1030) 64 


68 

69 

70 

71 

• 

73 

74 

75 

• 

77 

78 

79 

• 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

• 

87 

• 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 
100 


CHILD IS FATHER TO THE MAN 

Blood, Sweat & Tears (Columbia CS9619) 72 

THERE IS 

Dells (Cadet LP/LPS 804) 74 

TANGO 

Mantovani (London PS 532) 71 

SMOKEY ROBINSON & THE 
MIRACLES GREATEST HITS VOL. 2 

(Tamla T/TS 280) 76 

THE PROMISE OF A FUTURE 

Hugh Masekela (UNI 73028) — 

EASY 

Nancy Wilson (Capitol ST 2909) 75 

HISTORY OF OTIS REDDING 

(Volt M/S 418) 63 

THE MIGHTY QUINN 

Manfred Mann (Mercury SR 61168) 82 

A NEW PLACE IN THE SUN 

Glen Campbell (Capitol ST 2907) — 

HERB ALPERT'S NINTH 

Herb Alpert & Tijuana Brass (A&M 134/SP 4134) 68 

HEAVY 

Iron Butterfly (Atco 227/SD 227) 73 

STEPPENWOLF 

(Dunhill D/S 50029) 87 

REALIZATION 

Johnny Rivers (Imperial LP 12372) — 

WE'RE ONLY IN IT FOR 
THE MONEY 

Mothers of Invention (Verve V65045) 70 

WOMAN, WOMAN 

Gary Puckett & The Union Gap 

(Columbia CL 2812/CS 9612) 83 

DAYS OF FUTURE PASSED 

The Moody Blues (Deram DE 16012/DES 18012) 88 

FLIGHTS OF FANTASY 

Ventures (Liberty LST 8055) 90 

TWAIN SHALL MEET 

Animals (MGM SE-4537) 86 

FEELIN BLUESY 

Gladys Knight & The Pips (Soul 707) 100 

LOVE IS BLUE 

Lawrence Welk (Ranwood RLP 8003) 85 

HELLO DUMMY 

Don Rick’es (Warner Bros. /Seven Arts WS 1745) — 

FEVER ZONE 

Tom Jones (Parrot PAS 71019) 93 

TODAY MY WAY 

Patti Page (Columbia CL 2761/CS 9561) 78 

FLIP WILSON YOU DEVIL YOU 

(Atlantic SC 8179) 81 

THE ROMANTIC WORLD OF 
EDDY ARNOLD 

(RCA Victor LSP 4009) 91 

JOHNNY CASH AT FOLSOM 
PRISON 

(Columbia CS 9639) 95 

JONI MITCHELL 

(Reprise RS 6293) 94 

WEDNESDAY MORNING, 3 A.M. 

Simon & Garfunkel (Columbia CL 2249/CS 9049) 97 

REACH OUT 

Burf Bacharach (A&M 131/SP 4131) 98 

LOVE THAT 

Bert Kaempfert (Decca 74986) 79 

SOUL COAXING 

Raymond Le Fevre & Orch. (4 Corners FCS 4244) 89 

LUMPY GRAVY 

Frank Zappa (Verve V/V6 8741) 92 

HORIZONTAL 

Bee Gees (Atco 233/SD 233) 77 


101 

SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEART'S 

CLUB BAND 

Beatles (Capitol T/TS 2653) 

102 

VANILLA FUDGE 

(Atco 224/SD 224) 

103 

1 HEAR A RHAPSODY 

Jerry Vale (Columbia CS 9634) 

104 

MR. FANTASY 

Traffic (United Artists UAL 6351 /UAS 6651) 

105 

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

(Columbia CS 9614) 

106 

LOVE RHAPSODIES 

Midnight String Quartet (Viva V-36013) 

107 

WE'RE A WINNER 

Impressions (ABC 635) 

108 

SPIRIT 

(Ode Z12 44003/Z12 44004) 

109 

CIRCLE GAME 

Tom Rush (Elektra EKS 74018) 

110 

DANCE TO THE MUSIC 

Sly & The Family Stone 
(Epic LN 24371 /BN 26371) 


1 1 1 YOU CAN'T BEAT PEOPLE UP AND HAVE 
THEM SAY I LOVE YOU 

Murray Roman (Tetragrammaton 101) 

112 AMOR 

Roger Williams (Kapp KS 3549) 

113 THE TIME HAS COME 
Chambers Bros. 

(Columbia CL 2722/CS 9522) 

114 DOCTOR DOLITTLE 
Original Soundtrack 

(20th Century-Fox DACS 5101) 

115 VIKKI 

Vikki Carr (Liberty LST-7548) 

116 IT MUST BE HIM 

Ray Conniff (Columbia 2795/C5 9595) 

117 I HAVE A DREAM 

Rev. Martin Luther K'ng Jr. 

(20th Century Fox TEs 3201) 

118 TEMPTATIONS GREATEST HITS 
(Gordy GM/GS 919) 

119 KNIGHTS ON BROADWAY 
King Richard's Fluegel Knights 
(MTA MTS 5008) 

120 MAN OF LA MANCHA 

Original Cast (Kapp KRl 5405/KRS 5505) 


121 IF YOU EVER LEAVE ME 

Jack Jones (RCA Victor LSP 3969) 

122 JUST TODAY 

Bobby Vee (Liberty LST 7554) 

123 VALLEY OF THE DOLLS 

Original Soundtrack 

(20th Century Fox DTCS 4196) 

124 PISCES, AQUARIUS, CAPRICORN 
& JONES TD. 

Monkees (Colgems COM/COS 104) 

125 A DAY IN THE LIFE 

Wes Montgomery (A&M 2001/SP3001) 

126 THE SEA 

San Sebastian Strings 
(Warner Bros. WS 1670) 

127 ALICE'S RESTAURANT 

Arlo Guthrie (Reprise R/RS 6267) 

128 4 TOPS GREATEST HITS 

(Motown M/MS 622) 

129 FRESH CREAM 

Cream (Atco 206/SD 206) 

130 JIMMY SMITH'S GREATEST HITS 

(Blue Note BST 89901) 


131 GOLDEN RAINBOW 

Original Cast (Calendar KOM/KOS 1001) 

132 BOOTS RANDOLPH'S SUNDAY SAX 

(Monument MPL/SLP 18092) 

133 THE EYES OF THE BEACON STREET UNION 

(MGM SE 4517) 

134 FAREWELL TO THE FIRST GOLDEN ERA 

Mamas & Papas 
(Dunhill D/DS 50025) 

135 BEE GEES 1ST 

(Atco 223/SD 223) 

136 TO EACH HIS OWN 

Frankie Laine (ABCS 628) 

137 THE LAST WALTZ 

Engelbert Humperdin'k 
(Parrot PA' 61015/PAS 71015) 

138 TELL MAMA 

Etta James Cadet LP/TPS 802) 

139 WILDFLOWERS 

Judy Collins (Elektra EKS 74012) 

140 THE FIRST EDITION 

(Reprise RS 6276) 


COMPILED BY CASH BOX FROM LEADING RETAIL OUTLETS , Indicates Strong Upward Move 




Masic JUbum inventory 


A check list of best selling pop albums other than those appearing on the CASH BOX Top 100 Album chart. Feature is designed to call wholesalers' & retailers' 
attention to key catalog, top steady selling IP's, as well as recent chart hits still going strong in sales. Information is supplied by manufacturers. This is a weekly, 
revolving list presented in alphabetical order. It is advised that this card be kept until the list returns to this alphabetical section. ; 

I 


MOTOWN 


NASHBORO 


The Supremes 

Meet The Supremes 

MLP606/S-606 

The Supremes 

Where Did Our Love Go 

MLP621/S-621 

Four Tops 

The Four Tops 

MLP622/S-622 

Various Artists 

Collection 16 Orig. Hits Vol. Ill 

MLP624/S-624 

The Supremes 

More Hits 

MLP627/S-627 

Various Artists 

Collection 16 Big Hits Vol. IV 

MLP633/S-633 

Four Tops 

Four Tops Second Album 

MLP634/S-634 

The Supremes 

Supremes At The Copa 

MLP636/S-636 

The Spinners 

Original Spinners 

MLP639/S-639 

The Supremes 

1 Hear A Symphony 

MLP643/S-643 

Four Tops 

On Top 

MLP647/S-647 

The Supremes 

Supremes A Go Go 

MLP649/S-649 

The Supremes 

Supremes Sing Holland, Dozier, Holland 

MLP650/S-650 

Various Artists 

Collection Of 16 Big Hits Vol. V 

MLP651/S-651 

Four Tops 

Live 

MLP654/S-654 

Various Artists 

Collection Of 16 Big Hits Vol. VI 

MLP655/S-655 

Four Tops 

Four Tops On Broadway 

MLP657/S-657 

The Supremes 

Supremes Sing Rodgers And Hart 

MLP659/S-659 

Four Tops 

Reach Out 

MLP660/S-660 

Various Artists 

Collection Of 16 Orig. Hits Vol. VII 

MLP661/S-661 

Four Tops 

Four Tops Greatest Hits 

MLP662/S-662 

The Supremes 

Supremes Greatest Hits 

MLP2-663/S2-663 

Various Artists 

Collection Of 16 Big Hits, Vol. VIII 

MLP666/S-666 

Marvin Gaye 

Marvin Gaye's Greatest Hits 

TM252/S-252 

The Marvelettes 

Marvelettes Greatest Hits 

TM253/S-253 

The Miracles 

Greatest Hits From The Beginning 

TM2-254/S-2-254 

Various Artists 

The Motortown Revue In Paris 

TM264/S-264 

The Miracles 

Going To A-Go-Go 

TM267/S-267 

Stevie Wonder 

Uptight 

TM268/S-268 

Marvin Gaye & 

Kim Weston 

Take Two 

TM270/S270 

The Miracles 

Away We A-Go-Go 

TM271/S271 

Stevie Wonder 

Down To Earth 

TM272/S-272 

Marvelettes 

The Marveletes 

TM274/S-274 

Isley Bros. 

Soul On The Rocks 

TM275/S-275 

The Miracles 

Make It Happen 

TM276/S-276 

Marvin Gaye/ 

Tammi Terrell 

United 

TM277/S-277 

Marvin Gaye 

Marvin Gaye’s Greatest Hits Vol. II 

TM278/S-278 

Stevie Wonder 

1 Was Made To Love Her 

TM279/S-279 

Temptations 

Meet The Temptations 

G0R911/S-911 

Temptations 

Temptations Sing Smokey 

Temptin’ Temptations 

G0R912/S-912 

Temptations 

G0R914/S-914 

Martha & Vandellas 

Greatest Hits 

G0R917/S-917 

Temptations 

Gettin’ Ready 

G0R918/S-918 

Temptations 

Greatest Hits 

G0R919/S-919 

Temptations 

Temptations Live 

G0R921/S-921 

Temptations 

With A Lot O’Soul 

GOR922/S-922 

San Remo Golden Strings 

Hungry For Love 

G0R923/S-923 

Temptations 

In a Mellow Mood 

GOR924/S-924 

Martha & Vandellas 

Live 

G0R925/S-925 

Jr. Walker & All Stars 

Shotgun 

SOUL701/S701 

Jr. Walker & All Stars 

Roadrunner 

SOUL703/S-703 

Jimmy Ruffin 

Top Ten 

SOUL704/S-704 

Jr. Walker & All Stars 

Live 

S0UL705/S-705 

Gladys Knight & Pips 

Everybody Needs Love 

SOUL706/S-706 

Abbey Tavern Singers 

We’re Off To Dublin In The Green 

VIP402-S-402 

Gene Pitney 

MUSICOR 

Greatest Hits 

M2102/ST3102 

George Jones 

We Found Heaven Here At "4033" 

M2106/ST3106 

George Jones 

Greatest Hits 

M2116/ST2116 

George Jones 

Walk Through This World 

M2119/ST3119 

The Platters 

Going Back To Detroit 

M2125/ST3125 

George Jones 

Hits By George 

M2128/ST3128 

Gene Pitney 

Golden Greats 

M2134/ST3134 

The Platters 

New Golden Hits 

M2141/ST3141 

Gene Pitney 

The Gene Pitney Story 

M2148/ST3148 

George Jones 

Songs Of Dallas Frazier 

M2149/ST3149 

Lou Stein & Orch 

B’way Goes Honky Tonk 

M2150/ST3150 

Sounds Spectacular 

Great Motion Picture Themes 

M2151/ST3151 

Various 

Quartet Of Soul Vol. 3 

M2152/ST3152 

Sounds Spectacular 

51 Viennese Waltzes 

M2153/ST3153 

Gene Pitney 

Pitney Espanol 

M2154/ST3154 

Gus Vali & Orch 

Music For Belly Dancers Vol. 3 

M2155/ST3155 

The Platters 

Sweet, Sweet Lovin’ 

M2156/ST3156 

Paul Tipp 

Songs From Birthday House 

M5000 

Paul Tipp 

Party Time 

M5003D 

Bobby Capo with 

Invitation To Love 

M4035/S6035 

Puento Orch 

Kako & Orch 

Live It Up 

M4036/S6036 

Orquesta Broadway 

Do Their Thing 

M4037/S6037 

Mark Weinstein & Orch 

Cuban Roots 

M4038/S6038 

Willie Rosario & Orch 

Too Much! 

M4039/S6039 

Dioris Valladares 

Con Pimienta 

M4040/S6040 

& Orch. 

Tito Rodriguez 

Instrumentals A La Tito 

M4041/S6041 

Inez & Charlie Foxx 

Come By Here 

M7000/S8000 

Tommy Hunt 

Tommy Hunt’s Greatest Hits 

M7001/S8001 

Inez & Charlie Foxx 

Greatest Hits 

M7002/S8002 

A! Hurricane 

Mi Saxophone 

M9001/S10001 

Roberto Martinez 

Con Los Reyes DeAlbuquerque 

M9002/S10002 

George Jones 

If My Heart Had Windows 

MS3158 

Melba Montgomery 

Melba Toast 

MS3113 

Floyd Tillman 

Dream On 

MS3157 


Rev. Morgan Babb 

The Essential Character Of The Church (Sermon) 

7059 

The Skylarks 

Good News 

7058 

Brother Joe May 

I’ve Been Dipped In Water 

7057 

Esther Ford 

Profile Of A Great Lady 

7056 

The Traveling Notes 

Just A Little More Faith 

7055 

Elder Jonathan Greer 

Showers Of Blessings (Organ Inst.) 

7054 

Brother Joe May 

The Best Of Brother Joe May 

7050 

Mme Edna Gallmon 

The Memorial Album 

7049 

Cooke 

The Consolers 

The Best Of The Consolers 

7048 

The Angelic Gospel 

The Best Of The Angelic Gospel Singers 

7047 

Singers 

Prof. Alex Bradford 

1 Must Tell Jesus 

7046 

The Original Fairfield 

Angels Watching Over Me 

7045 

Four 

Prof. Harold Boggs 

1 Believe 

7044 

The Brooklyn Allstars 

Jesus Loves Me 

7043 

Mme. Edna Gallmon 

At The Gate 

7041 

Cooke 

Brother Joe May 

That’s Enough 

7039 

The Consolers 

The Soul Of The Consolers 

7037 

The Traveling Notes 

The Sensational Sound Of The Traveling Notes 

7034 

The Swanee Quintet 

Songs That Lift The Soul 

7026 

The Consolers 

Waiting For My Child 

7016 

The Swanee Quintet 

The Anniversary Album 

7008 


NONESUCH 




The Baroque Trumpet H-71002 

Bach: Magnificat In D H-71011 

Symphonies No. 6, Morning, No. 7, Noon, No. 8, Evening/ J. Haydn H-71015 
Concerto For Two Horns And Strings In F Major/Vivaldi H-71018 

Four Concertos For Harpsichords & Orchestra/J. S. Bach H-71019 

Purcell Sonata For Trumpet H-71027 

Mozart Concerto For 2 Pianos H-71028 

Cantata No. 140, Cantata No. 57/ Bach H-71029 

Six Sonatas For Flute & Harpsichord/C.P.E. Bach H-71034 

Mozart: Coronation Mass H-71041 

Concerto For 3 Violins And Orchestra In D Major/J. S. Bach H-71057 
Baroque Music For Recorders H-71064 

Jazz Guitar Bach/J. S. Bach H-71069 

The Four Seasons/Vivaldi H-71070 

Military Fanfares, Marches & Choruses — Napoleon’s Time H-71075 
The Splendor Of Brass/Telemann H-71091 

Rite Of Spring/Four Etudes For Orch./I. Stravinsky H-71093 

D. Scarlatti: 16 Sonatas For Harpsichord H-71094 

Renaissance Music For Brass H-71111 

Lute Music/J. S. Bach H-71137 

Momente/Stockhaus:n H-71157 

Music For The Classic Guitar H-71161 

Silver Apples of The Moon/M. Subotnick H-71174 

Complete Harpsichord Concerti/Bach HE-73001 

Brandenburg Concertos/ Bach HB-73006 






J 




4 


Various Artists 

ORIGINAL SOUND 

Oldies But Goodies VOL 1 


LPS 8850 

Various Artists 

Oldies But Goodies VOL II 


LPS 8852 

Various Artists 

Oldies But Goodies VOL III 


LPS 8853 

Various Artists 

Oldies But Goodies VOL IV 


LPS 8854 

Various Artists 

Oldies But Goodies VOL V 


LPS 8855 

Various Artists 

Oldies But Goodies VOL VI 


LPS 8856 

Various Artists 

Oldies But Goodies VOL VII 


LPS 8857 

Various Artists 

Oldies But Goodies VOL VIII 


LPS 8858 

Preston Epps 

Bongo Bongo Bongo 


LPS 8851 

Stan Hoffman 

Love At Last 


LPS 8870 

Norma French 

Preston Enps 

Surfin Bongos 


LPS 8872 

Bongo Teens 

The Skyliners 

Since 1 Don’t Have You 


LPS 8873 

Hollywood 

Drums A-Go-Go 


LPS 8874 

Persuaders 

Various Artists 

Big Bad Boss Beat 


LPS 8871 

The Music Machine 

(Turn On) The Music Machine 


LPS 8875 

Dyke & The Blazers 

Funky Broadway 


LPS 8876 

Various Artists 

Oldies But Goodies Vol. IX 


LPS 8859 

The Loving Sisters 

PEACOCK 

God’s Lonesome Highway 

P LP 143 


The Dixie Hummingbirds Your Good Deeds 

P LP 144 


The Chariot Gospel 

Tell Him 

P LP 146 


Singers 

Rev. Cleophus Robinson 

Rev. Cleophus Robinson 

Haircut In The Wrong Barber Shop 
(Sermon) 

Good Gospel 

P LP 147 

P LP 150 


Antioch Missionary 

Baptist Church 

Choir In Concert 

Rev. Isaac Henkhis 

The Second Coming Of Christ (Sermon) 

Songbird 208 
Songbird 209 



54 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 



The No. 1 Instrumental Group of 1 967 
With Their First Single Smash of 1968 

A Fantastic 2:08 Version of 



i Viva Records, distributed nationatly by Dot Reoordsi a Oivisiofi of Paramount Pictures Corporation, 1507 North Vine Street, Hollywood, California 90028 





ashBox 



Aibum Reviews 




Pop Picks 



THE LOOK OF LOVE — Eydie Gorme — 
Columbia CS 9652 

Eydie Gorme is now with the RCA-dis- 
tributed Callender label, but Columbia still 
has some strong Gorme sides in the can, as 
evinced by this powerhouse LP. The lark has 
never been in better form as she runs through 
the chart-riding “The Look Of Love,” “What 
Makes Me Love Him,” (from “Apple Tree”), 
“Make The World Go Away” and seven other 
familiar songs. lEydie’s strong track record 
makes this a must album for all outlets. 



THE REAL PEARL — Pearl Bailey — Project 
3 PR 5022 SD 

Pearl Bailey, who is captivating audiences 
on Broadway in “Hello, Dolly!” recorded this 
album this year on her day off. Miss Bailey, 
of course, is one of the luminaries in the 
history of entertainment, and this LP serves 
as an appropriate document in that history. 
Singing with the ease that comes only with 
accomplished artistry. Miss Bailey delivers 
some of her famous asides in “Nobody,” gives 
a tender treatment of the lovely “The Color 
Of Rain,” and offers a fine reading of the 
inspirational song, “I Believe.” “The Real 
Pearl” is a rare pearl. 


QUIETLY WILD— Billy Vaughn— Dot DLP 
25857 

Here’s a new package of 11 instrumentals 
from Billy Vaughn, highlighted by two mil- 
lion sellers, “Theme From ‘Valley Of The 
Dolls’ ” and “Love Is Blue” and the Grammy- 
winning “Gentle On My Mind.” As the title 
implies, songs are done slightly uptempo with 
the famous Vaughn twin sax sound. Of special 
interest is “Solitude (Sonata For Harpsi- 
chord),” a hauntingly beautiful Vaughn orig- 
inal. Vaughn has a tremendous following and 
this is a must stock LP. 



LOVE AND OTHER CRIMES— Lee Hazle- 
wood — Reprise 6297 

Lee Hazlewood has enjoyed considerable 
success as producer /writer for Nancy Sinatra, 
and their duet LP, “Nancy & Lee” is cur- 
rently on the charts. Produced by Hazlewood 
in Paris, this new set should do much to 
spread his fame. The artist introduces 6 self- 
penned numbers including “Wait & See” and 
the title song, and comes over especially well 
on two standards, “The House Song” and 
“She’s Funny That Way.” Should enjoy good 
sales. 









RIDIN’ HIGH — Martha Reeves & Vandellas 
— Gordy 926 

Martha & the Vandellas have had consider- 
able singles success in the six years they’ve 
been together, but this album marks a new 
high in their career. Three singles, “Honey 
Chile,” “Love Bug,” and “I Promise To Wait 
My Love” are joined by strong renditions of 
“(There’s) Always Something There To Re- 
mind Me,” “To Sir, With Love,” and “I Say 
A Little Prayer” to create a package which 
should quickly rise up the charts. 


THE SAVAGE SEVEN — Original Motion 
Picture Score — Atco SD 33-245 

Cream’s recent chart single, “Anyone For 
Tennis,” kicks off this new soundtrack entry 
from the American International pic. Iron 
Butterfly, which has an LP of its own on the 
charts, contributes two songs (both also in- ^ 
eluded in their LP), “Iron Butterly Theme” 
and “Unconscious Power,” and newcomers 
Barbara Kelly & the Morning Good perform 
“Maria’s Theme” and “Ballad Of The Savage 
Seven.” Could be plenty of action on this set. -i'f 


WAKE UP . . . IT’S TOMORROW— Straw- 
berry Alarm Clock — UNI S 73025 , 

Two recent single clicks, “Tomorrow” and 
“iSit With The Guru” highlight this new set 
from the Strawberry Alarm Clock. The group 
continues to serve out pleasing pop psyche- ^ 
delia which should turn on their many fans. 
“Curse Of The Witches,” which runs almost 
seven minutes, and the three-part “Black But- 
ter, Past, Present And Future,” should pick 
up strong FM play. Good set to stock. 


ITALIAN BRASS — MUSICA PER CUORI 
GIOVANI (MUSIC FOR THE YOUNG AT . 
HEART)— Fiesta FLPS 1517 

Here’s a selection of pop melodies arranged 
for brass instruments with a bold Italian 
flavor. The sound is brisk, spirited, and fresh. 

The sunny tunes include “Tarantella,” “Quan- 
do Dico Che Ti Amo (When I Tell You That 
I Love You),” “iSorrento Blue,” and “Ciri- ^ 
biribin.” This set is already selling excellently 
in the Latin market in New York, and could A -> 
very well gain broader acceptance in middle- 
of-the-road circles. 


Pop Best Bets 



DEFINITION— Chrysalis— MGM SE 4547 
MGM has launched a big push for its new 
pop act, Chrysalis. This drive is likely to be 
rewarded by the sextet (one gal and five 
guys). The low-keyed rock on this album is 
bubbly, bright, and highly infectious. Top 
tracks include “What Will Become Of The 
Morning,” “April Grove,” “Baby, Let Me 
Show You Where I Live,” and “Summer In 
Your Savage Eyes.” Chrysalis could create 
plentiful excitement with this disk. 


QUICKSILVER MESSENGER SERVICE — 
Capitol ST 2904 

The Quicksilver Messenger Service, the 
beneficiary of a major push by Capitol, offers 
a powerful selection of rock material, which 
includes the quartet’s first Capitol single, 
“IDino’s Song.” Other tunes on the set in- 
clude “Pride Of Man,” “It’s Been Too Long,” 
and “The Fool.” Instrumentally and vocally 
adept, the group could generate considerable 
sales activity with this album. 



WILD IN THE STREETS— Original Motion 
Picture Soundtrack — Tower 5009 

American International Pictures has had 
notable success with its soundtracks and this 
latest set should be no exception. Vet song- 
writers Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil have 
contributed six songs to the flick, including ft* 
‘‘Shape Of Things To Come,” released as a 
single by the 13th Power. Same group also ^ , 
does 4 additional songs in the flick, with 
two more coming from the Second Time. Two 
Les Baxter-composed -instrumentals round 
out the LP, which may well be in for heavy 
action. 


I WISH I KNEW — Billy Taylor — Tower ST ■v- 
5111 

Renowned jazz pianist Billy Taylor is spot- ^ 
lighted on this package of percolating ditties 
which should appeal to pop and jazz fans 
alike. The title tune of the set hit the charts 
recently in a vocal version by Solomon Burke. 
“Morning,” “Hard To Find,” and “Lonesome 
Lover” are other outstanding selections. Tay- 
lor is backed by Ben Tucker (bass) and Grady 
Tate (drums). Free-swinging and graceful, 
Taylor’s performance is scintillating. 


56 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 










•V 


r^ 




'T 


l*r 

•> 


if 


♦■r 


':m 

'A 




•- i 



West doesn’t stand for anything, any place, 
or any time... it just feels good and 
comfortable like the music. 

WEST 

‘Uust LikeTom Thumb’s Blues” 

5-10335 

An exciting new single. 

An unusual new sound on 

C EMC ^ 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


57 








ilshBox JUbum Reviews 



Pop Best Bets 



CHILDREN OF THE FUTURE— Steve Mil- 
ler Band Capitol SKAO 2920 

The Steve Miller Band, in its album debut, 
renders a group of blues-oriented tunes, cre- 
ating a rich, full, intense sound which should 
gain favorable response for this LP. Included 
on the disk are the title track, “In My First 
Mind,” “Baby’s Callin’ Me Home,” and “Key 
To The Highway.” The quintet would seem 
to have a bright future in store for itself. 



INFINITE McCOYS— McCoys—Mercury SR 
61163 

The McCoys have gone underground with 
this set. Previously a standard rock group, 
the quartet scored a chart success with “Hang 
On Sloopy.” This LP is a blend of jazz, psy- 
chedelia, and rock. Jazz qualities are particu- 
larly evident in the long (6:03) “Resurrec- 
tion.” “Hell” is a freaky, far-out cut, brood- 
ing and ominous. Tim Buckley’s “Song For 
Janie” is an attractive folk-rock ditty. The 
McCoys should find their new bag a profitable 
one. 


MICHEL LEBRANO 



rh' yi.mt 0 uirh O/ 


THE YOUNG GIRLS OF ROCHEFORT— 
Michel Legrand — United Artists UAS 6662/- 
UAL 3662 

Here’s a strong orchestral version of the 
score from “Young Girls” conducted and ar- 
ranged by its composer, Michel Legrand. 
Highly imaginative use of a jazz-tinged piano 
and organ makes this more than just another 
soundtrack takeoff. Legrand’s score for “Um- 
brellas Of Cherbourg” brought his talents to 
the best-seller lists, and this set might well 
follow a similar path. 



THE WORLD’S LAST PRIVATE CITIZEN 
— Barry McGuire — Dunhill DS 50033 

This latest LP from Barry McGuire con- 
tains a wide variety of material. Protest is 
represented by Dylan’s “Masters Of War” 
and McGuire’s first smash, “Eve Of Destruc- 
tion,” rock by “Hang On Sloopy” (with back- 
ground vocals by the Mamas & Papas) and 
“Walking My Cat Named Dog,” and folk by 
Travis Edmundson’s “Cloudy Summer After- 
noon.” McGuire handles all the idioms with 
ease and expertise. A natural for Barry’s 
fans. 



WITHOUT EARTH — The Moon — Imperial 
LP— 12381 

Launched with very little fanfare, this new 
set from the Moon is one of the best albums 
of the year. As vath the Bee Gees, they have 
taken a Beatle-introduced idea and carried it 
a step farther. The group’s chief cleffer, 
Matthew Moore, contributed 9 of the 12 cuts, 
including “Pleasure” and “Give Me More.” 
Other outstanding cuts on the album are 
“Brother Lou’s Love Colony” and “Got To 
Be On My Way.” In-store play will result 
in good sales. 


HAL HESTER DOES HIS OWN THING— 
RCA LSP/LPM 3996 

Hal Hester adds a Latin beat to the score 
from the award-winning rock musical, “Your 
Own Thing,” which he co-wrote with Danny 
Apolinar, and it proves a winning combina- 
tion. The “rock” is soft enough to appeal to 
a wide range of buyers. The entire album 
merits praise, but we’ll single out “The Flow- 
ers,” the swinging “Somethin’s Happ’nin’ 
(Baby, Baby!)” and the title song for special 
attention. iShould do quite nicely. 


SILVER APPLES— Kapp KS 3562 

Kapp records has slated a strong promo 
drive for this offbeat, inventive set from the 
two-man Silver Apples group. Utilizing 9 
audio oscillators with eighty-six manual con- 
trols played with hands, elbows, knees and 
feet, plus a thirteen-drum, five-cymbal per- 
cussion set, the duo produces a mystical sound. 
Lyrics have a poetic feel and add to the LP’s 
strength. Should be good vibrations in store 
for this effort. 


IN THE MIDNIGHT HOUR — Mirettes — 
Revue RS 7205 

The title song of this set was a chart rider 
for the Mirettes, a talented femme trio, and 
this LP should also do well. The group turns 
in strong performances on an unusual variety 
of material for an R&B-oriented album: “On 
The Good iShip Lollipop,” the Bee Gees’ “To 
Love Somebody,” and “iSomewhere” from 
“West Side iStory.” Other R&B standards, 
including the groups latest single, “Take Me 
For A Little While,” “Tweedlee Dee,” and 
“Keep On Running” also come off quite well. 
Expect good reaction. 


Jazz Picks 



STAN KENTON CONDUCTS THE JAZZ 
COMPOSITIONS OF DEE BARTON-^Capi- 
tol ST 2932 

■Stan Kenton’s creativity has kept his name 
in the forefront of the jazz world. Fronting 
an 18-piece band, Kenton salutes his once 
trombonist, now drumm.er. Dee Barton, by 
performing 7 of Barton’s compositions. Horns 
are the keyword here, 15 of them providing a 
rich setting for Kenton’s magic. The upbeat 
“Singing Oyster” and the Latin-flavored 
“Lonely Boy” are two of the better tracks 
on an LP which should experience healthy 
sales. 


CiassMcai Picks 



GINASTERA: PIANO CONCERTO (1961)/ 
VARIACIONES CONCERTANTES — Mar- 
tins; Boston Symphony/Leinsdorf — RCA Vic- 
tor LM/LSC 3029 RE 

Argentinian composer Alberto Ginastera is 
an artist of great stature in contemporary 
music, and his Piano Concerto is one of his 
most important works. Filled with startling 
rhythms, electrifying dissonances and fantas- 
tic orchestral colorations, the piece gives the 
listener many moments of excitement. Pianist 
Joao Carlos Martins and the Boston Sym- 
phony, Erich Leinsdorf conducting, turn in 
fine performances. 



HAVE YOU MET MISS JONES? — Artie 
Butler— A&M SP 3007 

Here’s a splendid set of jazz tunes per- 
formed by Artie Butler on piano and ondio- 
line. The music swings gently, and sparkles 
buoyantly throughout the album. In addition 
to the title track, the LP features “April 
Showers,” “Music For Night People,” and 
“When I’m 64.” This melodious disk is a de- 
light, and should score heavily in both jazz 
and pop circles. 



CHAVEZ; VIOLIN CONCERTO / Chavez- 
Buxtehude: Chaconne-Szerying ; Orquesta 
Sinfinica Nacinal De Mexico/Chavez-CBS 32 
11 0064 

Carlos Chavez here conducts the premier 
records of his Violin Concerto and his orches- 
tral transcription of a Chaconne originally 
composed for oi’gan by Dietrich Buxtehude. 
The Violin Concerto, on which Henryk Szer- 
ying is the brilliant soloist, is a beautiful 
work of great intensity. Chavez’ transcrip- 
tion of the Buxtehude Chaconne is skillful; 
the Chaconne itself is a lovely piece. 









CashBox 


Country Music Bopori 



r- 

JGreen Crass Crows On Music Bow 


NASHVILLE — The combined efforts 
of Tree Publishing Company execu- 
tives and one of its top writers has 
•Ai’esulted in a new publishing company 
in Nashville, Green Grass Music, 
^which will be headed by writer Curly 
" Putman. The company which is named 
^fter Putman’s biggest hit “Green 
^ Green Grass of Home” is a joint ven- 
ture between Putman and Tree, which 
is headed by Jack Stapp and Buddy 
Killen. 

► » Putman’s success at writing major 
country hits during the past few years 
_ j^led to formation of the company. In 
addition to “Green Green Grass” 
•jjfvhich was a multi-million seller, Put- 
man also penned “My Elusive 
Dreams” with Billy Sherrill, “Dumb 
Blonde,” “Set Me Free” and “Just For 
You,” co-written with Larrv Butler. 

A Tree writer for several years, 
Putman has also served as the pro- 
^ »fessional manager of the firm. The 


success of “Green Green Grass” in the 
U.S.A. and its number one position 
in England in January of last year 
promoted the decision to launch the 
new firm. Tom Jones success with the 
song made it one of the biggest sellers 
ever to hit the United Kingdom. 

Current Putman songs listed with 
the nation’s top hits are “DIVORCE” 
recorded by Tammy Wynette, which 
Putman co-wrote with Bobby Brad- 
dock, “I Promised You The World” 
recorded by Ferlin Huskey and “I’m 
Easy To Love” recorded by Stan 
Hitchcock. The Hitchock release will 
be the first for Green Grass Music and 
is already stirring up sales activity 
after only three weeks. 

Putman, originally from Huntsville, 
Alabama joined Tree in 1964. He has 
also recorded two of his own songs, 
“My Elusive Dreams” and “Set Me 
Free.” He and his wife Bernice, have 
two boys, Gregg 11, and Troy 6. 


"Col Fetes Flatt & Scruggs At Exec Luncheon 


NEW YORK — Columbia Records re- 
cently held an executive luncheon in 
'’honor of two its most respected art- 
ists, Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs. 
»- *Clive J. Davis, president of CBS Rec- 
ords, presided over the luncheon. 

'*>■ Flatt & Scruggs recently completed 
a series of personal appearances rang- 
, ing from the Avalon Ballroom in San 
Francisco to a concert tour of Japan. 
An instrumental written by Earl 
^*53cruggs, “Foggy Mountain Break- 
down,” is used extensively throughout 
'-►the award-winning motion picture 
“Bonnie and Clyde” and is featured in 
^3the duo’s latest album for Columbia, 


entitled “The Story of Bonnie and 
Clyde.” 

Flatt and Scruggs’ popularity on 
the folk-rock scene can be traced to 
their LP “Changin’ Times,” which 
first introduced “Foggy Mountain 
Breakdown” and included their rendi- 
tions of such contemporary composi- 
tions as Bob Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine 
Man” and “It Ain’t Me Babe.” 

While in New York, Flatt and 
Scruggs also appeared at an auto- 
graph session held in the record de- 
partment of A&S in Brooklyn to cele- 
brate the department store’s Country 
Music Week. 



- BIG MEETING — ^Decca Records re- 
cently held a big meeting of branch 
4 ^executives in Miami Beach, Florida 
to kick-off its 9th annual country and 
western promotion campaign and to 
*■ ’^introduce new product from its home 
r entertainment division. Decca VP 
V oydney N. Goldberg led a home office 
contingent of sales executives to the 
conclave. Goldberg is shown on the 
‘ dais at the meeting (center) with 
^3Iike Ross( left) and Howie Kaye 
(right), both of the home entertain- 
ment division. 


ABC Inks Pillow 

NASHVILLE — Grand Ole Opry star 
Ray Pillow has signed with ABC 
Records, announced Paul Cohen, who 
heads the labels operation here. 

During his four year stint with 
Capitol, Pillow clicked with two Top 
Ten records, “Thank You Ma’am” 
and “I’ll Take The Dog,” latter a duet 
with Jean Shepard. His other recent 
chart records include “Take Your 
Hands Off My Heart,” “Common 
Colds And Broken Hearts,” “Volks- 
wagen” and “Mr. Do-It-Yourself,” al- 
so with Jean Shepard. 

“It’s a great honor for me to work 
with Paul Cohen,” said Pillow, “and 
I look forward to my association with 
ABC.” While A&R director at Decca, 
Cohen was responsible for signing 
such all-time greats as Ernest Tubb, 
Brenda Lee, Patsy Cline and Kitty 
Wells. 


Country On Stupe 


BUD LOGAN 
AND BLUE BOYS 


, NASHVILLE ROOM, N.Y.— Ordi- 
'*'lnarily one wouldn’t pick a mid-week 
late show for review nurposes, since 
, the artists have so much going against 
them at a show of this type. For one 
thing, there’s the crowd — or the lack 
’^of crowd. And for another, most art- 
ists are pretty well worn out by the 
» >time the second sho'W comes around. 

However, we happened to catch a 
’’1:00 A.M., Wednesday evening per- 
formance by the Blue Boys at the 
Nashville Room last week and we de- 
I cided that it was a must for review. 

I • While most of the world remained 
[ ("at home pending news on the condi- 
' tion of the now late Sen. Robert Ken- 
I ^*'nedy, a crowd that was outnumbered 
by the performers (The Blu ; Boys and 
’ ' TOe Nashvilleans) was present for the 
club’s late show. Needless to say, an 


artist must be truly a pro to work to 
a near-empty house, and the Blue 
Boys measured up to the task. 

This is a strong, tight band — a band 
with a sound that makes an audience 
want to dance along. And dance they 
did, those few hardy souls. In fact, 
such was the caliber of the group’s 
professionalism that leader Bud Logan 
turned the show from an audience- 
performer situation into an all-in-to- 
gether party that was a ball. 

There was a lot of joy spread at 
that show, and a lot of joy was needed, 
the situation being what it was. One 
of the best things that can be said 
about any performance is that it was 
fun for the audience. And the Blue 
Boys 1:00 A.M. Wednesday show was 
fun for the audience. 


Bozeman To Helm New MT Promo Dept 


NASHVILLE — John Bozeman, Jr. 
has been named director of Moeller 
Talent’s newly-created promotion de- 
partment. Luck Moeller, president of 
the firm, made the announcement last 
week. He said that the new promo de- 
partment will begin operating offi- 
cially on July 1. 

Bozeman, who holds BA and BD 
degrees from Vanderbilt University, 
is no newcomer to the people of the 
Nashville Music industry. He is the 
creator of many radio-TV jingles cur- 
rently being aired in the Southeastern 
market, and composer of songs re- 
corded by artists on Dot, Liberty, and 
RCA Records. He personally manages 
the recording careers of RCA’s “Sing- 
ing Congressman” Richard Fulton 
and Columbia’s Arleen & Robbie 
Harden. He was recently designated 
by Chet Atkins to deliver Music City’s 
tribute to the late RCA Vice-Presi- 
dent and A&R executive from New 
York, Steve Sholes. 

Concerning his duties as director of 
promotion for the Moeller Talent 
Agency’s newly created department 
Bozeman outlines his objectives as 
follows: 1) to co-ordinate the promo- 
tional activities of all the artists un- 
der the Moeller roof. 2) keep the 
radio and TV music directors and 
deejays, the people in the trade jour- 
nal and newsprint media, and book- 
ing promoters informed of all artists 
activities. 3) to work with the artists 
in helping them develop their careers 
through a wide spectrum of promo- 
tional activities and techniques. 

These artists are: Webb Pierce, 


Carl Smith, Hank Snow, Faron 
Young, Jimmy Dickens, Kitty Wells, 
Johnny Wright, Porter Wagoner, Don 
Gibson, Waylon Jennings, Dottie 
West, Grandpa Jones, the Stonemans, 
Carl & Pearl Butler, Dolly Parton, 
Bill Phillips, Red Sovine, Slim Whit- 
man, Bobby Wright, Speck Rhodes, 
Mel Tillis, Norma Jean, Merle Travis, 
Justin Tubb, Willis Brothers, Johnny 
Darrell, the Hardens, Bob Luman, 
Duke of Paducah, Stoney Mtn. dog- 
gers, Max Powell, Juanita Rose, Bobbi 
Staff, Joe & Rose Lee Maphis, Snooky 
Lanson, Dale Turner, and Pat 
Mchinney. 

Until January of 1969, when the 
entire Moeller organization will move 
into its new headquarters now under 
construction on Nashville’s “Music 
Row,” Bozeman’s department will op- 
erate in the RCA Building, 806 17th 
Avenue South. 



John Bozeman 


Second Edition Of 
C&W, Gospel History 
Close To Completion 

MURFREESBORO, TENNESSEE— 
The second edition of the “History 
And Encyclopedia Of Country, West- 
ern And Gospel Music” is now being 
completed by Dr. Linnell Gentry, pro- 
fessor of Education at Middle Ten- 
nessee State University, and will be 
published in the fall of this year by 
Woltham Publishing Company. 

The first edition, published in 1961, 
was an immediate sellout, and with 
the current popularity of country mu- 



Decea’s crack chanter. Bill Anderson, 
is pictured here ( center) filling out a 
questionnaire that Dr. E. Linnell 
Gentry (right) will use in his En- 
cyclopedia Of Count7'y, Western And 
Gospel Music” Talent manager ex- 
ecutive Hubert Long (left) looks on. 

sic, the publisher anticipates substan- 
tial sales of the updated and expanded 
reference book. 

In hard cover, the book contains 
biographies of several hundred coun- 
try and gospel performing artists; ex- 
tensive data on the history and de- 
velopment of major country music 
shows; numerous articles on C&W and 
gospel music; and other information 
of interest to performers, deejays, 
radio and television programming ex- 
ecutives and musicians, as well as to 
avid fans and historians. 

The biographical section was com- 


ACWM Names Officers 

LOS ANGELES— The Academy of 
Country and Western Music held its 
third annual installation dinner Mon- 
day night, (June 3rd) at the Foothill 
Club in Long Beach. 

V eteran composer - publisher - enter - 
tainer Johnny Bond was elected Pres- 
ident of the Academy, succeeding Tex 
Williams. 

The following is a list of new offi- 
cers and board members for the 
1968-69 year: 

President, Johnny Bond. 

Vice-president, Billy Mize. 

Treasurer, Bill Ward. 

Director at Large, Harry Newman. 

Artist/ Entertainer, Tex Williams & 
Hal Southern. 

DJ, Larry Scott. 

Radio-TV, Robert B. McWhirter. 

Record Companies, Gordon Calcote. 

Club Operator, Bob Soccoro. 

Composer, Dean Kay. 

Manager/Booker, Jack Brumley. 

Musician, Cliff Crawford. 

Non-affiliated, Herb Eiseman. 

Promotion, Betty Azevedo. 


Dean To Endorse Vox 

HOLLYWOOD— RCA’s popular C&W 
personality, Jimmy Dean, has signed 
a Vox product endorsement contract 
which calls for Dean to use Vox equip- 
ment for a five year period for all ap- 
pearances: TV, radio, movies and con- 
certs. Included in this commitment 
will be the use of Vox equipment on 
his weekly musical variety show on 
ABC-TV. 


piled through the use of question- 
naires returned by performing artists, 
artist’s managers and major record 
companies. Substantial aid also came 
from the Country Music Association 
and the Country Music Hall of Fame. 

Articles and essays in the book are 
reprints from a collection of hundreds 
on the subjects taken from nearly 
every type of periodical over a period 
of 15 years. 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


59 




/r//l\'WV 

'"Illlm //ninW ////U\\\ 

.. .; ' .X^Jfi Mil \\/// / ililL ^ 

■SasthBmt Country Reviews 

' '■/ ' WV l I illlWW l TTJ r * 

vWi I ’:fJ Wut//// WW //// 

WWl;/// . WTT7777 \\\\l//// 


.^l ^v 

/TTmT^ //// \\\\ / //ny^ 

GashBox Country LP Reviews 

WWW 




■* i"' 




Picks o£ the Week 


WEBB PIERCE (Decca 32339) 

Stranger In A Strange, Strange City (2:00) [Tuesday BMI-Powell, Pierce] 
Looks like plenty a good deal more chart time will be logged by Webb 
Pierce, who follows up his most recent winner, “Luzianna,” with a stand 
called “Stranger In A Strange, Strange City.” The uptempo, but downhearted 
tale is in for lots of spins in short order. Flip: “In Another World” (2:42) 
[Jack O’ Diamonds BMI-Zanetis] 


BILLY WALKER (Monument 1079) 

Ramona (2:37) [Leo Feist ASCAP-Wayne, Gilbert] 

The strains of “Sundown Mary” have barely grown cold and Billy Walker 
has already launched what should be another chart winner. Updating the 
dusty old favorite “Ramona” with strings and mandolins. Walker has come 
up with a fine piece of product here. Flip: “One Inch Off The Ground” (2:32) 
[Combine BMI-Arnold] 


RED SOVINE (Starday 842) 

Loser Making Good (2:33) [Tarheel BMI-Milette] 

The redhead serves up a ditty called “Loser Making Good,” which is bound 
to be greeted by some healthy response from his many followers. Mid-tempo 
lid should soon be decorating a good many turntables. Flip: “Good Enough 
For Nothing” (2:14) [Starday BMI-Hill, Sovine] 


RUSTY DRAPER (Monument 1074) 

Buffalo Nickel (1:57) [Glaser BMI-Jarbee] 

Rusty Drapers name was revived quite a bit with “California Sunshine,” 
and may be breaking out big with “Buffalo Nickel.” An interesting lyric 
concept and an appealing pop-country production highlight the offering, 
which may catch on on a wide scale. Flip: “Make Believe I’m Him” (2:38) 
[Music City ASCAP-Balbraith, Mareno] 


DEE MULLINS (SSS Int’l 745) 

Texas Tea (2:38) [Shelby Singleton BMI-Peters] 

Dee Mullins stirred up quite a bit of noise with his tale of the “War 
Baby” and threatens to go much farther with “Texas Tea.” The rhythmic ode 
has an infectious sound that may bring home a gusher of sales for the 
songster. No flip information available at this time. 




Newcomer Picks 


GEORGE KENT (Athena 5001) 

The Baltimore Incident (2:13) [Newkey BMI-Hall] 

The Athena label bows with a strong item in the hands of George Kent. 
A smooth story line highlights the low-key “Baltimore Incident,” and the 
performance by Kent is bound to attract plenty of attention to both the 
songster and the label. Flip: “Trolling In The Sea Of Love” (2:08) [Newkey 
BMI-Newman] 


DAVID ROGERS (Columbia 44561) 

In Love With My Wife (2:56) [Moss Rose BMI-Mills] 

David Rogers has been stirring up some good noise lately and could break 
through with this unusual ballad titled “In Love With My Wife.” The tender 
romancer is a pretty thing that makes quite a change of pace from the crop 
of tunes that express just the opposite viewpoint. No flip info available. 


KIRK HANSARD (Chart 1038) 

Last Train To Nowhere (2:11) [Yonah BMI-Gibson] 

Kirk Hansard stands a strong chance of riding long and far on the “Last 
Train To Nowhere.” Enhanced with the gusto of “Cornin’ Round The Moun- 
tain,” the deck has a singalong flavor that should make it a juke box favorite. 
Flip: “Beyond The Thirteen Steps” (2:42) [East Star, Francis & Marvin BMI- 
Jay] 


BETH MOORE (Capitol 2188) 

I Will (2:34) [Central Songs BMI-Jordan] 

A fine vocal performance and a top-flight production set the stage for 
what could be a lofty chart perch for Beth Moore. Soulful quality of the 
lark’s performance on “I Will” makes for some real nice listening. Flip: “A 
Cheatin’ Good Time” (2:04) [Central Songs BMI-Moore] 


Best Bets 


5 


BOBBY HARDEN (Columbia 44543) 
The Texarkana (1:56) [Rural Hill 
ASCAP-Harden, Throckmorton] Could 
be some strong action in store with 
Bobby Harden with his latest. Good 
listening in this thumping, happy-go- 
lucky offering from Bob. Flip: “Don’t 
Drive Me” (2:39) [Da-Har BMI- 
Rhodes] 


SKELTON BROTHERS (Great 1175) 
If I Had You In A Jug (2:06) [Peach 
SESAC-R./E. Skelton] Skedaddling 
along with a clever novelty side, the 
Skelton Brothers can look forward 
to some nice airplay on “Jug.” Fun 
session may go. Flip: “Always, It’s 
You” (2:40) [Peach SESAC-R./E. 
Skelton] 

(Continued on page 61) 



St f Aif 
7* 

r- mt 

/ 1 I xi{ 

V> \UU 

*f Whvi * ■ 



f} 





My Shmmi,* Hour 

B«h)r« 'I h« Next 



IF MY HEART HAD WINDOWS— George^^ 
Jones-Musicor MS 3158 

The inclusion of a pair of George Jones re- 
cent smash singles, “If My Heart Had Win- 
dows” and “Bay It’s Not You,” make this:-1 
latest LP a sure-fire cinch to merchandise. As 
consistent as they come in the sales depart-.^i 
ment, Jones can look forward to hitting his 
usual hot sales stride with the package, which* ^ 
also includes some great tracks in “Possum 
Holler” and “Yon Angel Steps Out Of 
Heaven,” to name a few. A must for hard-core 
fans. 


BODY AND MIND— Norma Jean-RCA Victoi< ^ 
LPM/LSP 3977 

The avid Norma Jean fans are bound to be 
out in force for her newest Victor LP, sparked 
by her most recent hit, “Truck Driving^.^ 
Woman,” in addition to the title track. The 
appeal of the pretty songstress seems to grow . ^ 
stronger with each release, which indicates*'' 
that hot sales action is in store for this one. 
Among the tracks that stand out here are the' ^ 
lead-off stanza, “In The Park After Dark” and 
her version of the recent smash, “Promises, 
Promises.” 

V 

NOTHING TAKES THE PLACE OF LOV». 
ING YOU — Stonewall Jackson-Columbia CL 
2869/CS 9669 

Highly popular Stonewall Jackson comes 
across with a new album session that makes 
a fine addition to his growing Columbia cataT*' 
log. Titled after his recent chart-climbing 
single, “Nothing Takes The Place Of Loving-*''^' 
You,” the set is further enhanced by a re- 
vamping of the Jackson oldie, “Mary Don'i]U 
You Weep,” and the evergreen “Have I TokC 
You Lately That I Love You.” Album is top- 
flight Jackson material. 


ANOTHER TIME, ANOTHER WORLD— ^ 
Jerry Wallace-Liberty LST 7564 

An excellent assortment of material is of-.^.,. 
fered by Jerry Wallace in his brand new 
Liberty album. Made up mostly of hit num- 
bers, some old and some more recent, the set 
also features several tracks that have been as 
big with the popcrowd as with country audiv* 
ences. Among the latter are such items as 
“Ramblin’ Rose” and “A World Of Our Own,”.^ .,| 
while the contemporary country scene is rep- 
resented “Togetherness” and “Take Me As I«. 
Am (Or (Let Me Go),” among others. 


MY SHINING HOUR/BEFORE THE NEXT 
TEADROP FALLS— Duane Dee-Capitol T/ST. . . 
2931 

An artist with a strong future in store foivr 
him, Duane Dee makes his Capitol album 
debut with a session that’s bound to 
strengthen his position with his new, but 
growing, following. In addition to his own 
recent noisemaking singles, “My Shining^’ 
Hour” and “Before The Next Teardrop Falls,” 
the artist proves his versatility with strongW ' 
renditions of such favorites as “A World Of • 
Our Own” and “Danny Boy,” as well as thei^' 
self-penned “When 'The Devil Rides The 
Wind.” 


WOMAN, WOMAN ! WHAT DOES IT TAKE*^"' 
—Jimmy Payne-Epic BN 26372 

Although Jimmy Payne has never beeir*' 
blessed with a hit single of any major proper-^ 
tions, he can certainly take credit for being 
the first to introduce several big compositions, 
most of which he also co-wrote, to the public. 
Perhaps the biggest of these was “Woman, 
Woman,” followed by country goodies the.,*;, 
likes of “What Does It Take (To Keep A 
Woman Like You 'Satisfied)?” and “Wherf» 
Has All The Love Gone?,” all of which are^ 
included in this set. Package also features thi 
songster’s latest single, “Boston.” 


60 


Cash Box — June 15, 1966 





I 


CaABaac Top Country JtMbums 


C«AB«« Country Roundup 




1 

FIST CITY 

2 

16 

YOU ARE MY TREASURE 

12 


Loretta Lynn (Decca DL 4997/74997) 


Jack Greene (Decca DL 4979/4979) 


2 

HONEY 

Bobby Goldsboro (United Artists 

UAL 3642/UAS 6642) 

1 

17 

HERE'S CONWAY TWITTY 

(Decca DL 4990/DL 7 4990) 

20 




18 

MAKE MINE COUNTRY 

27 

3 

HEY LITTLE ONE 

8 

Charlie Pride 



Glen Campbell (Capitol ST 2878) 



(RCA Victor LPM 3952/LSP 3952) 


4 

LEGEND OF BONNIE & 


19 

THE LAST GOODBYE 

18 


CLYDE 

5 

Dick Miles (Capitol ST 2925) 



Merle Haggard (Capitol T/ST 2912) 


20 

A NEW PLACE IN THE SUN 

25 

5 

BEST OF BUCK OWENS, 


Glen Campbell (Capitol ST 2907) 



VOL 2 

(Capitol T/ST 2897) 

6 

21 

TAKE ME TO YOUR WORLD/ 1 





DON'T WANNA PLAY HOUSE 23 

6 

SING ME BACK HOME 

Merle Haggard (Capitol T/ST 2848) 

10 


Tammy Wynette (Epic BN 26353) 




22 

A WORLD OF OUR OWN 

16 

7 

THE COUNTRY WAY 

Charley Pride 

3 

Sonny James (Capitol ST 2884) 




(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3895) 


23 

KITTY WELLS SHOWCASE 

19 

8 

PROMISES, PROMISES 

4 

(Decca DL/DL 7 4961) 


Lynn Anderson (Chart CHM/CHS 1004) 


24 

JOHNNY CASH AT FOLSOM 


9 

TAKE ME AS 1 AM 

9 


PRISON 

— 


Ray Price (Columbia CS 9606) 



Johnny Cash (Columbia CS 9639) 


10 

BY THE TIME 


25 

WILD WEEKEND 

.I— 

1 GET TO PHOENIX 

11 

Bill Anderson (Decca 4998/74998) 



Glen Campbell (Capitol T/ST 2851) 


26 

BEST OF BOBBY BARE, 


11 

BEST OF EDDY ARNOLD 

13 


VOL. 2 

22 

(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3565) 



(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3994) 


12 

A TOUCH OF SADNESS 

17 

27 

NASHVILLE UNDERGROUND 

24 

Jim Reeves (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3987) 


Jerry Reed (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3978) 


13 

JUST BECAUSE I'M A 


28 

1 LOVE CHARLIE BROWN 

- 

WOMAN 

15 

Connie Smith (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 4002) 


Dolly Parton (RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3949) 







29 

MANY COUNTRY MOODS 


14 

JUST BETWEEN YOU & ME 

14 


OF WARNER MACK 

_ 

Porter Wagoner & Dolly Parton 
(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3926) 



(Decca DL 4995/74995) 



15 

GENTLE ON MY MIND 


30 

BOTTOM OF THE BOTTLE 

■ 

7 

Porter Wagoner 



Glen Campbell (Capitol MT/ST 2809) 



(RCA Victor LPM/LSP 3968) 



COUNTRY REVfEWS 

(Continued from page 60) 


FRANK IFIELD (Hickory 1507) 
(You’ve Got) Morning In Your Eyes 
(2:01) [Acuff-Rose BMI-Bond] Here’s 
^ a newie by Frank Ifield that could 
pull in big response, pop as well as 
^ country. Throbbing and funk-filled, 
the folk-like ditty may zoom. Flip: 
“Don’t Forget To Cry” (3:04) [Acuff- 
Rose BMI-Bryant] 

MELBA MONTGOMERY & JUDY 
LYNN (Musicor 1311) 

Isi Our Little Man (2:12) [Glad BMI-E./ 
( M. Montgomery] iSome fine teamwork 
^ is shown on this effort by Judy Lynn 
and Melba Montgomery. Bright flavor 
of this bouncy lid could catch on nice- 
ly. Flip: “Tell Me Your Troubles” 
(2:20) [Glad BMI-Lynn Behunin] 

r EDDIE McDUFF (Starday 843) 

Day After Never (2:30) [Tarheel BMI- 
McDuff] Eddie McDuff displays a lot 
of talent in this Starday deck. Song- 
^ ster’s capable handling of this ro- 
mance ballad could win him a lot of 
followers. Flip: “Part Time” (2:33) 
[Tarheel BMI-McDuff, Newbourne] 


WES HELM (Chart 1037) 

Blue Are The Violets (2:29) [Green- 
ly back BMI-Anderson, Anderson] The 
Ij plaintive appeal of this ballad offering 
4 by Wes Helm makes for some nice 
l( listening. iSongster could gain lots of 
attention with the deck. Flip: “The 
Girl From The Next Farm Over” 
, (2:14) [Peach SESAC-Helm] 


DAVE DAVENPORT (Capitol 2189) 
Right Now (2:35) [Hill & Range BMI- 
I Owens] Here’s an item by newcomer 
i Dave Davenport that’s a good choice 
/ for heads-up programmers. The right 
kind of airplay could bimg this one 
IV on home. Flip: “Crazy ©reams” (2:24) 

I [Hill & Range BMI-Owens, Solberg] 

/ JIMMY DAY (Stop 181) 

I’m Living For A Song (I’d Die To 
Sing) (2:32) [Window BMI-Day] Jim- 
I my Day stands a good chance to make 
! a big name for himself via this morn- 

i , ing treatment of the blues. Flip: “No 
One To Blame But Yourself” (2:12) 
[Window BMI-J./B. Day] 


CLIFF AYERS (K-Ark 821) 

Fool Such As I (2:11) [Leeds ASCAP- 
Trader] The years-back Presley hit 
gets a nice revamping by Cliff Ayes. 
Songster may bring the ditty back for 
a second chart journey. Flip: “My 
Empty Glass” (2:10) [Stringtown 
BMI-Francis] 

NANCY NORM AN (Train 1211) 

Big River Of Tears (2:40) [Caboose 
BMI-Holt] Nancy Norman could be an 
artist to watch in the very near future. 
Lark has a sound that makes this 
bluesy ballad an appealing side. Flip: 
“His Love Will Be All Mine” (2:23) 
[Caboose BMInSmith, Butrum] 

X LINCOLN (Dot 17101) 

In The Freedom Of My Mind (3:14) 
[Xaries ASCAP-Lincoln] A good 
sound by X Lincoln, who offers a gent- 
ly loping ballad with a sensitive touch. 
Perfect material for programmers 
looking for discoveries. Flip: “What 
Am I Gonna Do Now” (2:14) [Music 
City ASCAP-Lincoln] 

NORVILLE DOLLAR (Nugget 1021) 
Lonely Man (2:00) [L&O BMI-Gil- 
breath, Logan] Norville Dollar may 
soon be right back in the groove with 
this hard-moving piece. Deck has a 
strong sound that could spread over 
a wide front. Flip: “I’ll Just Be Lone- 
ly Again” (2:23) [L&O BMI-Withers, 
(Gilbreath] 

TOMMY HUNTER (Columbia 44541) 
(I Don’t Want No Woman) Tyin’ Me 
Down (2:14) [Shelby Singleton BMI- 
Peters] A pleasing, easy-paced mel- 
ody gets a smooth treatment from 
Tommy Hunter. Nice production makes 
it a well-rounded choice. Flip: “Are 
You Sad” (2:18) [Pamper BMI-Henry] 

GEORGE OWENS (RCA Victor 9529) 
I’ve Got My World Like I Want It 
(2:20) [Screen Gems-Columbia BMI- 
Arnold, Hayes] George Owens should 
break out sooner or later and this 
mid-tempo lid might be the one to do 
it for him. Easy-going lid sounds good. 
Flip: “I’m The Mail She’s Waiting 
For” (2:47) [Southtown BMI-Crysler] 


Chart Records president Slim Wil- 
liamson has announced that the label 
has decided to re-master the brand 
new Jim Nesbitt release, “Clean The 
Slate In ’68.” The deck, released only 
last week, is a spoof on the political 
scene, specifically the current presi- 
dential race, and makes reference to 
the late Sen. Robert Kennedy, who was 
a leading contender for the Democratic 
nomination until his assassination last 
week. Williamson’s decision has been 
to take the current version of the rec- 
ord off the market and re-release the 
disk without reference to the late sen- 
ator. In addition, he asks that deejays 
who may already have copies disre- 
gard these and wait for the new ver- 
sions. 

* * * 

The much-heralded stork finally ar- 
rived at the home of Connie Smith 
(Mrs. Jack Hawkins), but the winged 
character showed up a little bit too 
soon, it seems. Expected at the end of 
this month. Sir Stork dropped by the 
St. Thomas Hospital in Nashville on 
June 5 with a 7 lb., 11 oz. package, 
catching everyone by surprise and 
flatfooted for names. But named or 
not, the youngster is doing well, as are 
mother and dad. 

^ 

The newly-formed Musictown label 
has just signed up the versatile folk- 
pop-country group the Cumberlands 
as the newest additions to the record- 
ing roster. The trio (two guys, one 
gal) will be recorded within the next 
few weeks by Musictown A&R chief 
Joe Gibson. 

* * * 

The 3rd annual Mountain Dew 
Country Music Talent Contest begins 
this week (10) at Palisades Amuse- 
ment Park, N.J. All amateur country 
western singers, groups and musicians 
are invited to enter this contest which 
is being conducted by Smokey Warren, 
the Pepsi-Cola Metropolitan Bottling 
Company and Radio Station WJRZ. 
The competition, which offers an op- 
portunity for Country Western star- 
dom for the winning individual or 
groups will provide many prizes for 
the winner and runners-up. Free entry 
blanks may be had by writing to 
Warren, at Mountain Dew Talent Con- 
test, Palisades Amusement Park, Pal- 
isade, N.J. 07024. 

* * * 

Country Charley Pride and his pro- 
ducer, Jack Clement, will go to work in 
full view of the general public Satur- 



T HAVE RETURNED!’— Buddy Mize 
(right) worked in the Hollywood office 
of Central Songs (BMI) for five years, 
and now he has returned to the firm 
as general professional manager of 
the Nashville office. As a songwriter, 
he has been responsible for some of 
the pubbery’s most successful songs. 
He is shown here with Cliffie Stone, 
head of Central Music. 



FLYING TIGER — Superstar Buck 
Owens clowns around after receiving 
a U.S.A.F. recruiting service award 
in Denver, Colorado April 18, 1968. 
Presenting the award with a WAF 
recruiting Sgt. was Sgt. Mac McElyea. 


day night, June 15, as they put togeth- 
er a live concert album at the famous 
Panther Hall in Fort Worth, Texas. 
Some of the key Nashville musicians 
that have worked in the studio with 
Charley virtually since the beginning 
will participate in the session. These 
will include Lloyd Green on steel gui- 
tar, Jerry Carrigan on drums, and 
“Junior” Huskey on string bass. 

* * * 

Billy Gray, longtime country artist 
and member of the Ray Price band, an- 
nounced in Dallas that he will be 
leaving the Price show to enter the 
booking field on a full-time basis. 
Gray’s new company, Trans-World 
Talent, will be located at 8134 Barba- 
ree in Dallas. Gray has already set 
many artists with the new company, 
including Ray Price, James Bell, Vern 
Stovalt, Janet McBride and Johnny 
Seay, with two more important names 
in Country Music to be added to the 
TWT roster as soon as previous con- 
tract arrangements can be worked out. 
TWT has retained the services of 
Armstead Associated Artists, a Dallas 
based artist promotion firm, and Don- 
ro, Inc., another Dallas based public 
relations and advertising agency, to 
create a total artist service program 
described as unlike anything in the 
Country field today.” The TWT office 
in Dallas can be reached by calling 
area code 214 DA 8-1723. 

Hs * * 

Entertainment Associates, Inc., an- 
nounces the signing of Paula record- 
ing artist, Cheryl Pool, for exclusive 
personal management. Cheryl, an up- 
and-coming songstress from Tyler, 
Texas, has guested on numerous tele- 
vision shows, is a regular on the 
Louisiana Hayride and has appeared 
on the Grand Ole Opry. She was a 
regular with the Big D Jamboree in 
Dallas for two years. 

* * * 

Fast rising new Country songster, 
James Bell of Bell Records, has just 
signed a long-term personal manage- 
ment contract with Billy Jean Horton, 
widow of country great 'Johnny Hor- 
ton. Bell, who’s first release, “He Ain’t 
Country,” is currently represented on 
the Cash Box charts will continue to 
be produced by Darrell Glenn for Bell 
records and all public relations and 
disc-jockey material will come through 
Armstead Associated Artists. His 
booking will be handled by Trans- 
"World Talent in Dallas. 

Bell leaves May 31, for an extended 
tour with Ray Price throughout the 
Southern part of the United States. 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


61 




CMKVM 




shBiwi Country Top SO 


1 



I WANNA LIVE 

(Windward Side— BMI) 

Glen Campbell (Capitol 2146) 

D-l-V-O-R-C-E 

(Tree-BMI) 

Tammy Wynette (Epic 5-10315) 


3 THE IMAGE OF ME 

(Tree— BMI) 

Conway Twitty (Decca 32272) 


4 SWEET ROSIE JONES 

(Bluebook— BMI) 

Buck Owens (Capitol 2142) 


1 

7 

4 

5 


5 


HONEY 2 

(Russell -Cason— BMI) 

Bobby Goldsboro (United Artists 50283) 


6 ANOTHER TIME, ANOTHER 

PLACE 3 

(Passkey— BMI) 

Jerry Lee Lewis (Smash 2146) 


HOLDING ON TO NOTHING 

(Passkey— BMI) 

Porter Wagoner & Dolly Parton 
(RCA Victor 9480) 

WITH PEN IN HAND 

(Unart-BMI) 

Johnny Darrell (United Artists 50292) 


11 


THE EASY PART'S OVER 

(Hall— Clement— BMI) 

Charlie Pride (RCA Victor 9514) 


17 


14 


20 

21 



SHE WENT A LITTLE BIT 
FARTHER 

(Al Gallico-BMI) 

Faron Young (Mercury 72774) 

SOMETHING PRETTY 

(Attache — BMI) 

Wynn Stewart (Capitol 2137) 

IT'S OVER 

(Honey Comb— ASCAP) 

Eddy Arnold (RCA Victor 9525) 

COUNTRY GIRL 

(Tree-BMI) 

Dottie West (RCA Victor 9497) 

LOVE IS IN THE AIR 

(Wildweed— BMI) 

Marty Robbins (Columbia 44509) 

I'M GONNA MOVE ON 

(Page Boy— SESAC) 

Warner Mack (Decca 32308) 

WILD WEEKEND 

(Stallion— BMI) 

Bill Anderson (Decca 32276) 

RAINBOWS ARE BACK IN 
STYLE 

(Four-Star— BMI) 

Slim Whitman (Imperial 66283) 

AIN'T GOT TIME TO BE 
UNHAPPY 

(Al Gallico-BMI) 

Bob Luman (Epic 10312) 


6 

19 

24 

22 

25 

27 

10 


20 


29 


ROW, ROW, ROW 

(Blue Crest— BMI) 

Henson Cargill (Monument 1065) 

11 REMEMBERING 

(Vector— BMI) 

Jerry Reed (RCA Victor 9493) 


NO ANOTHER TIME 

(Yonah-BMI) 

Lynn Anderson (Chart 1026) 


14 

12 


RUN AWAY LITTLE TEARS 31 

(Blue Crest— BMI) 

Connie Smith (RCA Victor 9513) 

I'VE BEEN THERE BEFORE 30 

(Gramitto— BMI) 

Ray Price (Columbia 44505) 


15 


2S WE'LL STICK TOGETHER 

(Kitty Wells-BMI) 

Johnny Wright & Kitty Wells 
(Decca 32294) 


26 


13 I GOT YOU 

(Music City— ASCAP) 

Waylon Jennings & Anita Carter 
(RCA Victor 9480) 


9 


26 


TAKE ME ALONG WITH 
YOU 

(SPR, Noma-BMI) 

Van Trevor (Date 1594) 


28 



28 


32 

33 


36 


38 

39 

40 


42 


I PROMISED YOU THE 
WORLD 

(Tree-BMI) 

Ferlin Husky (Capitol 2154) 

HOW SWEET IT IS 

(Tree-BMI) 

Jack Reno (Jab 9015) 

THE ENEMY 

(Windown— BMI) 

J;m Ed Brown (RCA Victor 9518) 

NIGHT LIFE 

(Pamper— BMI) 

Claude Gray (Decca 321312) 

BORN A FOOL 

(Jack O' Diamonds— BMI) 

Freddie Hart (Kapp 910) 

MENTAL JOURNEY 

(Gallico-BMI) 

Leon Ashley (Ashley 2075) 

SOMETHING SPECIAL 

(Blue Echo— BMI) 

Mel Tillis (Kapp 905) 

WHAT MADE MILWAUKEE 
FAMOUS 

(Al Gallico-BMI) 

Jerry Lee Lewis (Smash 2164) 

HEAVEN SAYS HELLO 

(Four Star— BMI) 

Sonny James (Capitol 2155) 

HONEY (I Miss You Too) 

(Russell -Cason— ASCAP) 

Margaret Lewis (SSS Int'l 741) 

FOLSOM PRISON BLUES 

(Hilo-BMI) 

Johnny Cash (Columbia 44513) 

I'LL BE HATING YOU 

(Mayhew— BMI) 

Johnny Paycheck (Little Darlin' 0042) 

HE'S A GOOD OLE BOY 

(Wilderness — BMI) 

Arlene Hardin (Columbia 4461) 

LEGEND OF BONNIE & 
CLYDE 

(Blue Book-BMI) 

Merle Haggard (Capitol 2123) 

I FEEL YOU, I LOVE YOU 

(Mayhew— BMI) 

Bobby Helms (Little Darlin' 0041) 

FIST CITY 

(Sure-Fire— BMI) 

Loretta Lynn (Decca 32264) 


33 

32 


37 

36 

40 


13 


35 


47 


46 


43 


YOU OUGHT TO HEAR 
ME CRY 

(Pamper— BMI) 

Carl Smith (Columbia 44486) 




44 

45 


WILD BLOOD 

(Passkey— BMI) 

Del Reeves (United Artists 50270) 


SUNSHINE & BLUE BIRDS 

(Newkeys— BMI) 

Jimmy Newman (Decca 32285) 


44 

18 

41 


YOU JUST STEPPED IN 
(From Steppin' Out On Me) 

(Sure-Fire— BMI) 

Loretta Lynn (Decca 32332) 


I STARTED LOVING YOU 
AGAIN 

Merle Haggard (Capitol 2123) 


48 


JIMMY RODGERS BLUES 

(Southern— ASCAP) 

Elton Britt (RCA Victor 9503) 


49 


MY BABY WALKED 
RIGHT OUT ON ME 

(Party Time — BMI) 

Wanda Jackson (Capitol 2151) 


56^t 


ALREADY IT'S HEAVEN 

(Al Gallico-BMI) 

David Houston (Epic 10388) 


38 

51 

HE AIN'T COUNTRY 

James Bell (Bell 710) 


52 

1 BELIEVE IN LOVE 

45 

Bonnie Guitar (Dot 17097) 

39 

53 

IT'S MY TIME 

George Hamilton IV (RCA Victor 9519) 

54 

THE OLD RYMAN 

Hank Williams Jr. (MGM 13922) 

42 

55 

LIKE A MERRY-GO-ROUND 

Liz Anderson (RCA Victor 47-9508) 


56 

LEAVE THIS ONE ALONE 

Nat Stuckey (Paula 300) 

16 

57 

SUGAR FROM MY CANDY 

Ray Griff (Dot 17082) 

48 

58 

LOCK, STOCK & TEARDROPS 

Diana Trask (Imperial 4077) 

21 

59 

BE PROUD OF YOUR MAN 

Porter Wagoner (RCA Victor 9530) 


60 

CULMAN ALABAMA 

Roger Sovine (Imperial 56291) 






r*) 

j 





The 
Best of 
maOa 
JbuAaum 


Nobody walks out on 

Wanda Jackson's 
newest hit single: 

MY BABY WALKED 
RIGHT OUT ON ME 


A fast-moving, ear-catching song that's running 
— not walking — right up the charts. 

B/W “No Place to Go But Home" 

Publishing; Party Time Music, 1025 S.W. 59th Street, 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

DJ's needing copies, write Party Time Music. 


Also on the fast track 
her new album, 

'THE BEST OF 
WANDA JACKSON." 


Bookings: 

Jim Halsey Agency, 
Independence, Mo. 


4 

-♦1 


< 1 





% 




(52 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 




June 15, 1968 



Claes-Goran Hederstrom took part in the Eurovision Song Contest with "Det Borjar Verka Karlek, Bonne Mej" (Good Grief It's Like That Love They Talk About) and since then the 
disk has sold over 100,000 in Sweden, earning him a gold disk. It Is also high in the Norwegian charts. An RCA contract artist, Hederstrom will appear on German TV in Sept, 
and plans for him to visit France and Spain are under way. 


I 



Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


63 





Great Britain 


4 

i> 


CashBox Jtustraiia 




Managing Director of the British limb of Liberty Records, Bob Reisdorf, 
is to leave the company which he set up here nearly a year ago. He is expected 
to return to the United States in July and no successor has yet been named. 
Reisdorf, who agreed to establish Liberty here but to remain in control for 
only a limited period, is now expected to take up activities outside the record 
field. He is a Director of a Marine Construction company in Washington. 
In view of the close association of Liberty Records and United Artists in 
America, it is thought possible that the two labels will merge their British 
operations next year, but this is not confirmed. 

Notwithstanding the depression inflicted on the pre-recorded tape market 
by the introduction of a 50 per cent purchase tax, a new tape cartridge 
company called 8 Track Stereo has been formed here. Under the direction of 
Mike Price, the company will import tape players mainly from Japan and is 
expected to attack both the 4 track and 8 track markets. 

Pye Records, one of the most thrusting record companes in Britain, has 
set the date and venue for its 9th Annual (Sales Convention. Managing Director 
Louis Benjamin will host the event at the Europa Hotel on (September 6th 
and it is expected that a full complement of Pye’s sales reps and other 
personnel will attend. A large delegation of overseas licencees are also ex- 
pected to attend a special sales convention on September 5th. 

In the increasingly competitive field of stereo records. Philips Records has 
scheduled the launching of a new album series under the blanket title “Living 
Presence.” First release will be 6 LPs’ comprising works by the Wally Stott 
Chorale, the Baroque Brass, the Johnny Gray Saxophone and Quado Brass. 

Polydor Records which, under the direction of Roland Rennie, has carved 
out a significant place for itself on the British record market, goes from 
strength to strength. By virtue of deft acquisition of American catalog par- 
ticularly the label has distinguished itself in the sales charts with such names 
as Aretha Franklin, Otis Redding, Archie Bell, William Bell — who are cur- 
rently riding high here — and a host of others who are released on the Atlantic 
and Stax labels. To this already impressive list of successes, Rennie now adds 
the Kama Satura and Buddah labels. Released here at present by Pye Records 
the switchover is effective from September 1st and thus such successful artists 
as the Lovin’ Spoonful, the 1910 Fruitgum Company and the Lemon Pipers 
come into the Polydor orbit. But if Polydor has scored heavily with its impor- 
tations, its development of local talent has also been impressive. Apart from 
attracting the Who and the Cream to the Polydor camp, the company has 
“broken” its share of new artists. Most recent of these is Julie Driscoll and 
the Brian Auger Trinity on Poly dor’s Marmalade label. With a view to stimu- 
lating this area of activity, Rennie has appointed Peter Knight, Jr., as A&R 
Controller. He takes up his post from July 1st. Son of a top British MD, he 
joined Pye Records at 18 years of age to work in the A&R Department. He 
also became a radio producer. His experience also embraces artists manage- 
ment, music publishing and management of label affairs on an international 
basis. Says Rennie, “We are extremely happy to have secured Peter’s services. 
Though a young man he has gained a wealth of wide experience in many 
aspects of the record business.” 

The build up of RCA Records, now an independent entity in this country, 
is continuing. Graham Hayson joins the firm on July 1st as Distribution Man- 
ager of the Record Division. He will endeavor to set up the RCA distribution 
network. For the past two years Hayson has been Distribution Manager of 
Pye Records. RCA has also appointed Leslie Kettle as Administrator to the 
Artist Development Department. For the past 13 years Kettle has been profes- 
sional Manager of Frank Music (representing Frank Loesser) within the 
Chappell publishing group. Gary Osborne, son of Tony Osborne, joins Richard 
Kerr on RCA’s pop A&R staff. Having penned songs for the Seekers, Vikki 
Carr and Val Doonican, Osborne will now write for Sunbury Music, RCA’s 
publishing subsidiary. 

Songwriters Mitch Murray and Peter Callander, who started their own Intune 
publishing company in March this year and had an instant hit with “Bonnie 
And Clyde” by Georgie Fame ('CBS) have penned John Rowles follow-up on 
MCA “Hush . . . Not a Word to Mary.” The same team are responsible for 
Georgie Fame’s new CBS single “Kentucky Child” which is being issued 
worldwide except in Britain where his new release is “By The Time I Get To 
Phoenix.” Murray and Callander recently visited the States where they nego- 
tiated a short term contract with April-Blackwood for their compositions. They 
have also :figned a new writer to the Intune company. 

Alan Blaikley and Ken Howard, the songwriting duo responsible for the suc- 
cess of such artists as the Honeycombs, Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and 
Tich and the Herd, are launching a new solo singer whom they have named 
Heath Hamptsead. He makes his debut on the Fontana label with “Tenament 
Tragedy” published by Lynn Music. The disk also marks the debut of Howard 
and Blaikley as producers. “Boy,” recorded by Lulu, also looks like chart 
material. 

EMI Records, which scored briefly with the last Beatles release in a unique 
two-disk six-track package, is now to release a 7" album by the Move. This 
is not part of some adventurous new marketing plan, however, it is the only 
form in which the company can market a “live” performance by the group. 
According to EMI’s pop repertoire chief Ron White, the tapes of the per- 
formance could not be edited to an extended play disk so the decision was 
taken to innovate in the size of the album. While the company has no plans 
to make 7" albums a regular line in merchandise, if the item sells at a really 
significant rate the company is bound to consider some fruther releases in 
this field. The disk itself, “Something Else From The Move,” comprise five 
tracks and will retail at normal EP price. 

Quickies: “A Man Without Love” topping Best Selling Sheet Music Lists 
for Valley Music . . . Norrie Paramor, now a freelance producer, has formed 
Nordic Music with Noel Gay chief Richard Armitage . . . EMI held its annual 
international classical recording conference attended by delegates from Amer- 
ica, France and Germany. 


Great Britain's Top Ten LP's 


1 John Wesley Harding — Bob Dylan ' 
(CBS) 

2 Scott 2 — Scott Walker (Philips) 

3 This Is Soul — ^Various (Atlantic) 

4 History Of Otis Redding — Otis 
Redding (Stax) 

5 Sound Of Music — Sovmdtrack 
(RCA) 

6 Smash Hits — Jimi Hendrix 


(Track) 

7 Supremes Greatest Hits — Su 
premes (Tamla Motown) 

8 Fleetwood Mac — Fleetwood Mac 
(Blue Horizon) 

9 Love Andy — Andy Williams 
(CBS) 

10 Jungle Book — Soundtrack (Dis- 
ney) 




Australian Record Company is pouring on a very substantial promotion 
effort on behalf of the new locally produced (CBS) single featuring Christine , , 
Roberts with two Australian songs written by Ken Taylor and Franz Conde, 
“(The Ballad Of) The Snow Goose” coupled with “You Can’t See 'Round ^ 
Comers.” The latter title is inspired by a local television show of the same 
name. Co-writer Ken Taylor is, in addition to being the personal manager of ^ 
Christine Roberts, the general manager of radio station 2GB. 

Bobby Goldsboro, who is still heading our national best-seller list with his ^ 
giant international smash “Honey,” is now represented by the album of the 
same title released on the U/A label through the Festival group in this coim- 
try. Two other single clicks that have grown into current album releases 
through Festival are “The Unicom” by the Irish Rovers and “The Dock Of 
The Bay” from Otis Redding. 

Dermot Hoy who spent quite a time as professional manager for the Castle/ 
Belinda music publishing group has now left that company to move into the';- 
newly created post of Australian Label Manager for Phonogram Recordings 
Pty. Ltd. This move, coupled with the recent signing of local artist Paul Wayne, 
indicates that Phonogram (Philips, Mercury, Fontane, etc.) have a well-planned 
campaign for entering the local recording field. Paul Turner is the General ^ 
Manager of the Phonogram set-up in this country. 

Australian aboriginal World Bantamweight Boxing Champion Lionel Rose 
is the subject of a new locally produced single that is getting strong air-play 
and sales action. The song is called “The Ballad Of Lionel Rose” and is sung ^ 
on a new Philips single by local boy Rim D. Paul. Publishing rights in the 
song are held by Castle Music. 

A concert promotion (group known as World Hosts Pty. Ltd. is staging a 
series of concerts by popular American star Wayne Newton, On the same bill 
will be Wayne’s brother Jerry, and Jackie Kahane, with muncal director 
Tommy Amato. 

Tony Geary, from the publishing house of J. Albert & Son, is drum-beating ' 
on behalf of a whole slew of hot copsrrights that the company has, including 
“If I Were A (Carpenter,” “Bring A Little Lovin’ ” (written by George Young ■ 

& Harry Vanda from the Easybeats), “A Beautiful Morning,” “Friends,” 
“Little Green Apples,” “What’s Wrong With My World,” “White Horses” and v* 
“Hello, How Are You.” 

Local group City Stompers have their debut single out on the Astor label ^ 
with “Times Like This” (local composition by Russ Dickenson & Mike Carmody) 
and “Half Past Midnight” composed by Les Emmerson from the Canadian 
group the Stacattos. City Stompers are produced by Russ Dickenson. 

Australian international star Rolf Harris is back home for a brief visit on - 
a concert tour. There is no doubt that Rolf is one of the great acts to come out ' 
of Australia. His stage work is a delight for sure, and many of our young po- 
tential stars could learn a few good professional ideas on presentation and 
pacing of an act by absorbing the work of Harris. 

• — — — — — — — — — 

Australiti's Best Sellers 


This Last Weeks 
Week Week On Chart 


10 

9 


Honey (Bobby Goldsboro — U/A) Leeds Music. 

Young Girl (Union Gap — CBS) Crown Music. 

A Man Without Love (Englebert Humperdinck — Decca) D. ^ 
Davis & Co. 

The Unicom (The Irish Rovers — ^Festival) Essex Music 
Son Of Hickory Holler’s Tramp (O. C. Smith — CBS) Palace 
Music. 


6 3 

7 5 

8 8 

9 4 

10 7 


5 Congratulations (Cliff Richard — Columbia) J. Albert & Son. ^ ^ 
7 Valleri (The Monkees — RCA) Screen Gems /Columbia. 

4 Mighty Quinn (Manfred Mann — Philips) J. Albert & Son. i 
4 To Sir With Love (Lulu — Columbia) Screen Gems /Columbia. 

13 Love Is Blue (Paul Mauriat — Philips) Leeds Music. 


Great Britain's Best Sellers 


1 

1 

2 

2 

3 

4 

4 

8 

5 

3 

6 

7 

7 

6 

8 

10 

9 

9 

10 

12 

11 

11 

12 

13 

13 

16 

14 

14 

15 

5 

16 

16 

17 

18 

18 

17 

19 

20 

20 

— 


5 Young Girl — Union Gap (CBS) Mecolico 

5 Honey — ^Bobby Goldsboro (U.A.) United Artists 

6 *Man Without Love — Engelbert Humperdinck (Decca) Val- 

ley > 

6 *I Don’t Want Our Loving To Die — The Herd (Fontant) Lynn 
12 What A Wonderful World — Louis Armstrong (HMV) Val- ’'^1 

ando 

4 *Rainbow Valley — Love Affair (CBS) Cyril Shane 

7 *Lazy Sunday — Small Faces (Immediate) Immediate ^ 

4 *Joanna — Scott Walker (Philips) Welbeck 

9 Simon Says — 1910 Fruitgum Co. (Pye) Mecolico 
3 *This Wheel’s On Fire — Julie Driscoll (Marmalade) Feldman 

3 * Sleepy Joe — Herman’s Hermits (Columbia) Carter-Lewis 

4 *Helule Helule — The Tremeloes (CBS) Peter Walsh 

2 Do You Know The Way To San Jose — Dionne Warwick 
(Pye) Blue Seas 

6 *White Horses — Jacky (Philips) Gerard ^ 

9 Can’t Take Mye Eyes Off You — Andy Williams (CBS) Ard- 
more & Beechwood 

2 *Jumping Jack Flash — The Rolling Stones (Decca) Mirage 
2 U.S. Male — Elvis Presley (RCA) Valley 
11 *If I Only Had Time — John Rowles (MCA) Leeds 
2 I Pretend — Des O’Connor (Columbia) Peter Maurice 
1 *Blue Eyes — Don Partridge (Columbia) Essex 
♦Local copyrights 


64 


Cash Box — ^June 15, 1968 


CnshBox Internaiionai News 


Report 


Phil Bose Elected WB-Seven Oris VP 


BURBANK, CALIF.— Phil Rose, man- 
ager of the international department 
of Warner Bros.-Seven Arts Records, 
Inc., has been named an officer of the 
company, assuming the post of vice 
president and director of the interna- 
tional department. Mike Maitland, 
president of the company, made the 
disclosure following his election. 

Rose joined Warner Bros.-lSeyen 
Arts Records, Inc., in 1965, coming 
from his previous position as sales 
manager for Canada’s Compo Com- 
pany, Limited, where he had directed 
that company’s activities for fifteen 
years. 

Since joining Warner Bros., Rose 
has travelled extensively throughout 
Europe and the Far East, and is di- 
rectly charged with the responsibility 
for the sales and merchandising of 
Warner Bros, and Reprise Records 
with foreign licensees throughout the 
world. 


Under his direction, Warner Bros.- 
Seven Arts Records established its 
Canadian based distributing organiza- 
tion, Warner Bros.-Seven Arts Rec- 
ords of Canada, Ltd., with offices in 
Montreal and Toronto. “The latter op- 
eration,” Maitland commented, “is 
eminently successful, with Warners 
more than doubling its volume in Can- 
ada thus far this year.” 

Rose will continue operating out of 
the company’s headquarters in Bur- 
bank, reporting to Maitland. 

Other officers of Maitland’s man- 
agement staff include Joe Smith, vice 
president and general manager of 
Warner Bros.-iSeven Arts Records; Mo 
Ostin, vice president and general man- 
ager of Reprise Records; Joel Fried- 
man, vice president and director of 
marketing; Ed West, vice president 
and treasurer; 'George Lee, vice presi- 
dent and director of eastern opera- 
tions. 



FLOWERS OVERPOWER — Carrying a welcoming garland, Shirley Bassey 
arrived at the Milan airport on the commencement of a one-month stay in Italy. 
Ehiring the visit, she will record three new songs for United Artists release; 
receive the “Gold Diapason” in Siracusa, iSicily; tape three television shows 
in Rome; and appear at the opening night of La Bussola, Italy’s biggest summer 
music hall. She also has been named best female foreign talent by the Associa- 
tion of Italian Music Critics for her LP “Shirley Means Bassey.” On hand to 
greet the artist at the airport were Elio Gandolfi (left), the Cemed Carosello 
star who was Miss Bassey’s partner at San Remo in performing “La Vita”: 
and (to the right) Cemed Carosello’s managing director Giuseppe Ricci, and 
well-known Italian composer Maestro D’Anzi. 


McWilliams, Wood 
Make Italian Visit 

MILAN — Two of the top foreign art- 
ists, with hits high on the Italian 
charts, were in the country last week. 

David McWilliams, currently oc- 
cupying the #2 slot with “Days Of 
Pearly Spencer,” released here by CBS 
Italiana, was in Italy for three days. 
He was in Milan on May 12th, where 
he was guest of honor at a gala press 
conference. He also took part in sev- 
eral radio shows and was guest star 
on one of the top TV shows. 

“Days Of Pearly Spencer” has been 
translated into Italian as “H Volto 
Della Vita,” and the Italian version, 
recorded by to Italian femme vocalist 
Caterina Caselli on CGD, is sharing 
the #2 spot with McWilliams. 

McWilliams informed us that he will 
soon be back for a long concert tour all 
over Italy, and that Caterina Caselli 
will also be on the bill. 

Second hot artist in town was Bren- 
ton Wood, enjoying a very strong suc- 
cess with “Gimme Little Sign,” the 
Double Shot Records release distrib- 
uted in Italy by Belldisc Italiana. Dur- 
ing his stay, he performed at the 
Piper Clubs in Rome and Milan, and 
did shots on two top TV shows. 

Wood was accompanied by his pro- 
ducer, Hal Winn, vp of the USA pub- 
beries Big Shot and Hot Shot Music. 
Federico Monti Arduini, international 
manager of Belldisc Italiana and man- 
ager of it’s Telstar pub firm, has an- 
nounced that Telstar will exclusively 
represent both musical catalogues in 
Italy. 

Belldisc has just released Wood’s 
follow-up single, and his first LP. 


Budde, Monument Confabs 

HOLLYWOOD^olf Budde, of Budde 
Musikverlage-Berlin, arrived here last 
week to begin a series of talks with 
Monument Record execs Fred Foster, 
president, and Bobby Weiss, vice pres- 
ident and director of the record and 
music publishing division, regarding 
the Fall plans for expansion of the 
Monument music catalogues controlled 
in Germany, Switzerland, Austria and 
Holland by Budde. 

Monument publishing subsids in- 
clude Combine, Vintage, Music City, 
Songs of the World, Wide World of 
Music, Longhorn and Cape Ann. In 
addition. Monument represents the 
catalogues of Mar-lSon, Matamoros, 
Claremont and House of Bryand. 

Combine and Vintage have had in- 
ternational hits with “Distant Drums,” 
“Three Rivers,” “iSatin Pillows” and 
“My Ancestors” among others. 

Foster flew in Friday (7) in time to 
attend the Boots Randolph Hollywood 
Bowl concert (8). 


Preben Uglebjerg Dies 

COPENHAGEN— Preben Uglebjerg, 
37, popular stage, screen and TV actor, 
also well known via a large number of 
recordings, was killed on the evening 
of May 31, when his car was forced off 
the road by another car. The latter 
never stopped, but continued in direc- 
tion to Copenhagen, and later also hit 
another car with three people being 
injured. 

Uglebjerg was married to ballet 
dancer Puk Schaufuss and the couple 
had a recently born son who was to 
have been baptized two days after the 
accident. 


Cershwin Star Of Venice Jazz Fest 


VENICE — George Gershwin was 
really the heart of the First Interna- 
tional Jazz Show of Venice, organized 
by the Casino and the Tourist Office of 
Venice. 

The jazz show took place on three 
nights. May 17, 18 & 19, and its suc- 
cess made it one of the top musical 
events of the year in Italy. 

With this new addition, Venice has 
become one of the most important 
centers of artistic and musical life. 
Venice already is host for a Festival 
of the Classical and Contemporary 
Music, the International Light Music 
Show (organized by Gianni Ravera) 
the largest Italian film festival and 
the Biennial Exhibition of Modern Art. 

'The conceiver and organizer of the 
show is Danilo Prandi, who has been 
gratified by the wide coverage given to 
the event in the Italian press. 

The first and second nights of the 
show were held on the stage of the 
Casino’s theater, “La Perla.” 

Performers 

Guest star of the first night was 
American soprano Irene Oliver, who 
interpreted three spirituals, “Let Us 
Break Bread Together,” “My Lord 
What A Morning” and “My Soul’s 
Been Anchored,” plus two song’s from 
Gershwin’s “Porgy & Bess,”: “My 
Man’s Gone Now” and “Summertime. 
Miss Oliver, accompanied by one of the 
top Italian jazz pianists, Arnaldo 
Graziosi, was warmly welcomed by the 
audience. 

Performer’s for the second night 
were The Modern Art Trio from Italy, 
featuring Franco D’ Andrea (piano), 


Franco Tonani (drums) and Marcella 
Melis (bass) ; the Martial Solal Trio 
from France, with Martial Solal 
(piano), Gilbert Rovere (bass) and 
Daniel Humair (drums); and the Lou 
Bennett Trio from the U.S., Lou Ben- 
nett (Hammond organ), Andre’ Con- 
covant (guitar) and Joe Navy 
(drums). 

Two big names of the US jazz world. 
Slide Hampton and Johnny Griffin, 
concluded the concert accompanied by 
a big band conducted by the Italian 
maestro, Giancarlo Gazzani. 

Hampton and Griffin devoted their 
concert entirely to George Gershwin. 

The show had its explosion in the 
third night, held at “La Fenice,” one 
of the most famous Italian operatic 
theaters, when Morton Gould, one of 
the top American conductors, took 
charge of the Orchestra La Fenice for 
four wonderful performances from the 
George Gershwin songbook: “An 
American In Paris,” “Concerta”, in F 
“Rhapsody in Blue” and a new Gould 
arrangement of the “Symphonic Suite 
from Porgy & Bess.” Gould was aided 
by Mrs. Andriana Brugnolini, one of 
the foremost Italian pianists and Ger- 
shwin interpreters. 

It is impossible to describe the great 
enthusiasm shown by the overflowing 
audience for Gould’s performance. 

At a private dinner after the show, 
Gould acknowledge his tremendous re- 
ception: “It has been a wonderful ex- 
perience and I would like to be here 
again every year for this unique event, 
which couldn’t have a better home 
than wonderful Venice.” He also paid 
tribute to Mrs. Brugnolini for her fine 
Gershwin interpretations. 


Fred & Playboys Tour 

SHREVEPORT— Paula Record’s John 
Fred and his Playboy Band have 
kicked off their worldwide tour with 
two successful engagements in Eng- 
land: the Kinemar Ball Room, Dunfer- 
line, and the Pavilion, Hemel Hemp- 
stead. Group’s next stop is Scotland 
(Com Exchange, Kelso; Regal Ball 
Room, Bonnyrigg), and then back to 


England for dates in Manchester 
(Taisted Wheel), Nelson (Imperial 
Ball Room), Warrington (the Co-Op) 
and Stoke (the Place). Other dates al- 
ready set will send the group to Scan- 
dinavia, Sweden, Denmark and Ire- 
land. Fred’s “Judy In Disguise” smash 
is still riding high on European charts. 



THAT’S GOLD AS IN GOLDSBORO— Sweetening the “Honey” pot, Canada 
delivered a gold disk to match the one earned by Bobby Goldsboro for million 
sales in the U.iS. In fact, the single has gone well over two-million. The Cana- 
dian goldie was merited when national sales climbed past the 100,000 figure. 
Plaque is here being given by Lee Armstrong, (2d from right), sales manager 
of the Apex division of Compo of Canada, to UA vp & gm Mike Lipton (2d 
from left). Flanking the gift-bearers are Ron Ayres (left) int’l head of UA, 
and East Coast artist relations man Danny Crystal. 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


65 





4 

! 



Under the title “Musica D’Estate” (Music Of Summer), EMI Italiana has 
started a new promotional campaign to introduce a series of 14 singles and 5 
LP’s expressly released for the summer season. The 14 singles chosen by EMI 
Italiana for their summer campaign are interpreted by A1 Bano, the Lords, 
Sacha Distel, the Small Faces, Ray Charles, Giusy Romeo, the Beach 
Boys, Lulu, Herman’s Hermits, Adama, I Nomadi, the Renegades, Cliff Richard 
and Sonia. 4 albums are devoted to the talents of Ray Charles, Lou Rawls, 
Adamo and the Beach Boys, while the fifth is a selection of the summer re- 
leases of top Italian EMI artists. 

We have been informed by RCA Italiana that the English top group Procol 
Harum have just recorded their first single in the Italian language. The two 
titles chosen for their debut in Italian are “H Tuo Diamante” and “Fortuna.” 
The decision to issue recordings in Italian by them is directly connected with 
the great popularity the group is enjoying in our country thanks to their big 
hits of “A Whiter Shade Of Pale” and “Homburg.” 

Anna Identic! is back on the record scene with her single just released for 
the summer. “A” side of the record is “Non Calpestate I Fiori.” The record is 
issued under the Ariston label, and the song is also published by Ariston. The 
song has been introduced via the TV contest “A Record For The Summer.” 

Silvye Vartan, top French songstress, is expected in Italy during the month 
of June. Silvye is enjoying great popularity on our market thanks to her present 
best seller single “Come Un Ragazzo” which is listed among the top positions 
in our charts. In Italy she will guest star different top TV shows. 

Another top RCA Italiana foreign artist will soon be back in our country. 
We refer to Sandie Shaw who, as it has been announced, will take part in the 
next International Light Music Show of Venice. This is the third time that 
Sandie will participate in this manifestation which this year celebrates its 
fourth anniversary. Recently RCA Italiana has introduced on the market her 
latest single interpreted in Italian. Titles are “Oggi” (Today) and “Londra” 
(London). 

The first Italian recording of the second prize of this year’s Eurovision 
contest, “Congratulations,” has been released by Ariston with their young 
talent Mario Guarnera. The title remains the same. The original version has 
been, of course, released by EMI Italiana some weeks ago. 

Top Italian artist Adriano Celentano has just presented on the market his 
latest single, “Una Carezza In Un Pugno” and “Azzurro.” The same composi- 
tions have been included in a new LP by him which has just been released. 
Both records have obtained, as all Celentano discs, an immediate strong re- 
action on the market. The titles of the single are published by the Cain Celen- 
tano pubbery, Edizioni Clan. At the same time, Norby Varenholz of Ariola 
Schallplatten in Germany has informed us of the big succes Adriano is ob- 
taining on the German market. At the end of April, Adriano was star guest of 
a big TV show in Munich where he introduced the latest song released for the 
German market “Eravamo In Centomila.” This song is now listed among the 
first positions in the charts of Germany and Austria. 

Another idea of the great talent of this artist is the news that he has been 
chosen by one of the biggest Italian film directors, Pietro Germi, to star in 
Germi’s latest film “Serafino” presently being shot in Rome. 

Ri.Fi Records is enjoying strong sales reaction for two of their latest re- 
leases: “Angeli Negri,” a re-edition of the famous song “Agelitos Negros,” 
interpreted by the Ri.Fi top talent Fausto Leali and the second, an original 
Italian melody entitled “Amore, Amor” performed by Iva Zanicchi. 


Italy's Best Sellers 

This 

Last 

Weeks 

Week Week On Chart 

1 

2 

5 

*La Bambola: Patty Bravo (RCA Italiana) Published by RCA 
Italiana & Mimo 

2 

4 

6 

11 Volto Della Vita/Days Of Pearly Spencer: Catarina Caselli 
(CGD) David McWilliams (CBS) Published by Ricordi 

3 

3 

5 

*Vengo Anch’io No Tu No: Enzo Jannacci (RCA Italiana) 
Published by RCA Italiana 

4 

1 

8 

Gimme A Little Sign: Brenton Wood (Belldisc Italiana) 
Published by Telstar 

5 

6 

4 

Come Un Ragazzo: Silvye Vartan (RCA Italiana) Pub- 
lished by RCA Italiana. 

6 

7 

. 8 

The Ballad Of Bonnie & Clyde: Georgie Fame (CBS Itali- 
ana) Published by Ariston 

7 

9 

9 

Affida Una Lacrima A1 Vento: Adamo (EMI Italiana) Pub- 
lished by EMI Italiana 

8 

11 

4 

*Io Per Lei: I Camaleonti (CBS Italiana) Published by 
Sugarmusic 

9 

8 

2 

* Chimera: Gianni Morandi (RCA Italiana) Published by 
Mimo 

10 

5 

5 

Lady Madonna: The Beatles (Carisch) Published by Ricordi 

11 

12 

2 

Delilah: Tom Jones (Decca) 

12 

10 

2 

Love Is Blue: Paul Mauriat (Phonogram) The Renegades 
(EMI Italiana) Published by Esedra 

13 

— 

3 

Words: The Bee Gees (Phonogram) published by Senza Fine 

14 

— 

1 

*Non Ti Scordar Di Me: Sergio Leonard! (CGD) Published 
by Sugarmusic 

15 


1 

*Piccola Katy: I Pooh (Vedette) Published by Sciascia 
*Denotes Original Italian Copyrights. 


Germany Record Mir's Sales 


(Courtesy “Schallplatte”) 


This Last Weeks 
Week Week On Chart 

1 1 13 Mama — Heintje — Ariola — Hans Sikorski Music 

2 2 7 Delilah — Tom Jones — Decca — Francis Day & Hunter 

3 3 7 Delilah — Peter Alexander — Ariola — Francis Day & Hunter 

4 4 5 Congratulations — Cliff Richard — Columbia — Hans Gerig 

Music 

5 5 2 Du sollst nicht weinen — Heintje — Ariola — Ed. Maxim 

6 6 5 *Ein Hoch der Liebe (Three cheers for love) — Wencke Myhre 

— Polydor — Altus Music/P. Kirsten 

7 7 3 Jumbo — The Bee Gees — Polydor — Rudi Slezak Music 

8 8 2 *Cotton Fields — Udo Jurgens — Ariola — Montana 

9 9 3 Man gratuliert mir (Congratulations) — Cliff Richard — Co- 

lumbia — Hans Gerig Music 

10 10 2 What A Wonderful World — Louis Annstrong — Philips — 

Valando 

*Original German Copyright 


France 


As with everything else here, the record industry is completely paralyzed 
with strikes, pickets in the pressing plants and distributors, lack of mail 
service and gasoline, etc. Musicians are on strike also and all recording ses- ■» y 
sions were cancelled. The situation is tense and record producers are full of 
anxiety. French industry is not in a very comfortable position for the opening 
of the Common Market because of the extremely heavy taxes, and important 
social reforms have created huge difficulties. 

The Common Market is, of course, the first worry of French producers who 
have to change their price policies. To compete with 10 Marks German col- 
lections. Philips (through Fontana) and Vogue just launched low-price LPs 
at the rate of 12 Francs. At the same time, Pathe Marconi, which is the 
French branch of E.M.L, released a new classic single series priced the same ^ - 
as that for varieties, 6.50 Francs. 

Publisher Gerard Tournier is delighted with the new Sylvie Vartan hit •** 
“L’Oiseau.” The very pretty RCA artist is working again, six weeks after 
her car crash. iShe fiew to London to record her next album. ^ 

A great artist added to the RCA roster: Danielle Darrieux, famous song- 
stress and movie star. Claude Gagniere, marketing manager, announced that 
independent producer Jacques Canetti will also soon join RCA. Canetti, the 
man who launched Jacques Brel, Geroges Brassens, Guy Beart and lately 
Serge Reggiani just fell out with Polydor. 

Vogue launches a new EP collection: “Disque d’or.” It presents old hits from 
Vogue’s greatest artists. Through this label, Pierre Perret just released a new 
EP. Perret recorded a treatment of Sidney Bechet’s most famous composition: 

“Les Oignons” (Vogue International Publishing). Antoine also released through 
Vogue an LP with three pages of comics. Main titles are “Bonjour Salut,” “La 
Tramontant,” and Tout Nu Devant Ta Glace.” 

;^die Barclay is back in town after a tour of France. During his trip, 
Barclay listened to more than 2,000 singers. Thirty were called together in the 
Barclay studios in Paris where they sang before 100 DJ’s, journalists, radio '' '< 
and TV producers. Eight of them were signed a day later. 

After the good success of the “Canon de Pachelbel” recorded by Michel 
Dintrich, lyrics were written and vocal group the Pop Tops present it as a 
Negro spiritual. 

Quickies: Philips released an LP with a story from TV serial “Les Chevaliers 
du del” . . . Serge Gainsbourg and Michel Simon recorded a duet: “L’Herbe 
Tendre” . . . New title for Guy Mardel through CBS, “Parceque I’on s’aime” 

Les Compagnons de la Chanson are back in town after a Israelian stay. . . . 


Germany 





With the warm months of summer now coming in and the former dead period 
in the record business ready to hit us in full strength, the industry here is 
readying for the biggest display of pop music festivals the Continent has ever 
seen. The big event in Germany is, of course, the German Pop Music Contest 
with the finals being held on July 4th in Berlin, but there is plenty of activity 
aside from this which keeps the (German stars busy. 

The first festival is the Karlsbad Festival with two stars from Germany 
participating in this behind the Iron Curtain event. The first TV program is 
sending Ariola star Rex Gildo, and Phonogram’s newest star Alexandra will 
represent the 2nd TV program. Festivals in Mallorca, Austria, France, Belgium, 
etc., will keep the next few months swinging. 

D.G.G. has done some shifting in their Polydor department with Mike Von 
Winterfeldt taking over as product manager for singles, Werner Klose ap- 
pointed product manager for LP’s, Fritz Warnke acting as Product Manager 
for low price LP’s and Klaus Egetmeyer responsible for the advertising. 

Liberty Records reports that Vic Dana, who has done his first German 
language waxing, is set for his first TV shot in Germany and will be here for 
the big “Studio B” show where he will do the star slot and sing 3 songs. Liberty 
is also flying high saleswise with a new sampler called “This Is Rock & Roll” 
featuring old goodies by Fats Domino, Eddie Cochran, Bobby Vee, Jerry Lee 
Lewis, etc. The special price is 12.80 DM ($3.20) against the regular price of 
18 DM ($4.50) for LP’s. The disc has moved 11,000 copies in the first 8 days 
of release. 

Klaus Teubig of Francis Day & Hunter writes that “Delilah” is not only 
topping the charts here but has been recorded 4 times locally as well with the 
record selling like hot cakes. 

Hans R. Beierlein of Edition Montana reports that the German team for the 
“International Song Festival” in Sopot, Poland, is set with Alexandra, Rex Gildo 
and CBS star Peter Beil. The Montana firm has set up a separate publishing 
and publishing company in Paris. Montana entered an agreement with Philips 
in Paris. The name of the company is Edition No. 7 and will be run through 
the Tutti Organization. Waldemar Kuri is in charge of the management. In 
other behind-the-iron-curtain news, Udo Jurgens has been engaged for the 
Golden Orpheus Festival on the Bulgarian Black Sea Coast. 

Erni Bilkenroth of Edition Marbot tells us that the Michael Polnareff number 
“Arne Caline” which was done by Peggy March under the title of “If You 
Loved Me” is getting action. The instrumental record “Soul Coaxin’ ” is also 
getting heavy play. The big tune at present for the publishing house is “If I 
Only Had Time” by John Rowles and a new German version as well. The 
U.S.A.’s Wanda Jackson also has a German hit for the publishing house on 
Capitol. 

EMI’s daughter firm Electrola has taken over the distribution of Dot Records 
in Germany. Dot has been with Deutsche Vogue for the last few seasons. The 
firm has also signed Thomas Fritsch from Polydor. 

Polydor’s Freddy Quinn became the first major western artist to do a session 
behind the Iron Curtain. Freddy’s new single “Don Diri Don” was recoi'ded in 
Prague, Chechoslovakia. 

Teldec tells us that Mantovani is set for a tour of Gennany in June. Mantovani 
will appear in the “Golden Shot” TVer on the 20th of June. July will mark the 
visit of Erich Leinsdorf. The RCA Victor maestro will get a big kickoff for 
the visit from Teldec here. 

From Switzerland comes news that the Edition Helbing headed by A. Brunner 
has formed a new record production and label. The label called “Heco” has 
signed Zurich bandleader Bert Campbell and has their first LP set called “Party 
Sounds.” The label will concentrate on the German and Swiss market as a start. 

August Seith of Chappell Music reports that the big Louis Armstrong hit 
“What A Wonderful World” has been recorded by Polydor’s top teen star 
Roy Black. This is more or less a guarantee of at least % million records sales 
and a top hit parade slot. That’s good news. 

And that’s it for this week in Germany. 








- 4 . 





^•4 


<4 

.1 



66 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


4 


CashBon BoUttnd 


Following the highly successful promotion campaign for Blue Cheer’s “Sum- 
■ ’’ mertime Blues,” the record made a tremendous jump on the charts to No. 5 this 
week. Their album “Vincebus Eruptum” also proves to be a precious item for 
**■ the Dutch rock fans (Philips). 

The record “White Horses” by Jacky is a tremendous success in England. 
> Last week the record was also released in Holland and though the television 
series w'here the song comes from is not transmitted here, the catchy melody 
^ might click here also and give Jacky a hit in Holland (Philips). 

On the President label the new Felice Taylor single was recently released 
here. “Captured By Your Love” is a jumpy tune and sounds very fashionable. 
*■ A chart tip with several radio stations already. 

The jazz-fans are very happy with a Decca re-issue, called “The Hawk In 
Holland” featuring Coleman Hawkins and the Ramblers. The fourteen tracks 
on the album were recorded in Holland in 1935 and ’37. 

•r Due to the concerts Bill Haley and His Comets did in Holland May 26th, N.V. 
Phonogram released the early Haley success “See You Later, Alligator” on 
the Brunswick label. The earlier released ‘^Rock Around The Clock” is now 
bubbling under the charts. 

In a beautiful full color sleeve, the new Rolling Stones single was released 
^ last week by N.C. Phonogram. This Decca record is called “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” 
and will be a new smash for the very popular British group. 

On Coral a fantastic Jackie Wilson album was released called “Manufacturers 
Of iSoul.” Mr. Wilson is accompanied by the Count Basie Band on this album. 
^ Also a new Jackie Wilson single was released recently called “Funky Broad- 
way.” From Deram arrived two very good records this week: “Streatham 
,y Hippodrome” by the Cuppa T. and “The Muffin Man” by the World of Oz. 

Canadian born singer Davy Jones recorded four tracks in Holland for Philips 
Records. Two of these were recently released. “Sookie, Sookie” especially could 
^ be a gigantic hit here. 

Following the success of “Do You Know The Way To San Jose,” N.V. Phono- 
gram released Dionne Warwick’s album “Windows Of The World” (Scepter). 
N.C. Phonogram also gives special promotion to “High On A Hill” by 15 year 
^old British trumpeter Nigel Hopkins (Philips). This kind of material has a 
good chance to become a hit here. 

Last week Bovema released “Times Were When” by the Cats on the Imperial 
label. Also on Imperial albums by De Chico’s, Ferenc Lakatos, Eric Krans’ 
y Dixieland Pipers, Ad van den Ho^, Frans Poptie and Max Woiski, Sr. were 
released by Frank Jansen, the Dutch repertoire man of Bovema. Bovema’s 
•y Buddah department is very active again. Mr. Theo Roos was the first in Europe 
to release “Yummy, Yummy” by the Ohio Express and “Jelly Jungle” by the 
Lemon Pipers. He also released the Captain ^efheart album “Safe As Milk.” 
^The famous French conductor Raymond Lefevre has become very popular in 
Holland. His latest Riviera album, including the European winner “La La La” 
and “The Canon of Pachelbel” is a bestseller. 

Rock is back in Europe! Mr. Joop Visser of the American repertoire ties in 
r with the rock revival by releasing a set of golden rock hits. Included are rock 
classics by Fats Domino, Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochran and Johnny Otis. 

“Call Me Lightning” (Essex-Basart) by dynamic English group the Who 
entered the Dutch charts by taking the 39th spot this week. Riding high in 
»the Dutch top lists are local Impala-Basart copyrights: “Snowflakes On Am- 
sterdam,” the After Tea follow up of “We Will Be There After Tea” (31), 
“Ups And Downs” written for the Eddysons by hit/song writing team Duke 
Baker and Roddie Wahr (26), and “I See Your Face Again” by the Sandy 
Coast which song takes the 12th position now. “Black Veils Of Melancholy,” 
second hit for sensational Status Quo, settled this week for the number 19 spot. 
“Take Time To Know Her” (Basart) by tremendous soul singer Percy Sledge 
► seems to become a top 5 record. The song jumped from 18 to 9. This week 
another smash hit for Basart handled Abigail catalog: the Bee Gees latest 
“Jumbo /The Singer Sang His Song.” 

Basart Records International released Eurovision’s runner up “Congratula- 
'^tions” by the Royal Military Band, one of the best bands in this field. Other 
highlights of Basart’s Record Department include a hit of Fred Wiegman: 
“Feyenoord Krijgt Een Zoen, Ajax Kampioen” and “Jumpin’ Like A Kangaroo” 
by John Russell. Shirley Zwerus, the leading female R & B artist in Holland 
^ recorded a cover version of “Big Boss Man” (Goodman-Basart) for the Relax 
label. 

^ Dutch top formation the Cats recorded as their new single “I Like The Way” 
(Basart) and “Times Were When” (Connelly-Basart). The disc is to be released 
^this week on Imperial. 

Bospel Music got the copyrights of 2 big successes from the American hit 
parade: “Cowboys To Girls” of the Intruders, and the Young Rascals with their 
“A Beautiful Morning.” “Sind Sie Der Graf Von Luxemburg” with which the 
German singer Dorthe (Philips) reached the number one spot in her own coun- 
'T try is going to sell well in Holland. Yvonne Wijne (a newcomer) made the Dutch 
version, and Reggy van der Burgt is also going to record a Dutch version on the 
”> CNR label. “Misere” is the title with which Belgian singer Hugo Dellas is 

I going to debut at the coming Knokke Festival. Bospel Music got the exclusive 
». rights for this ballad. 

Artone has once more succeeded in launching a sure fire hit by popular duo 
^ Johnny Kraaykamp & Rijk de Gooyer. Earlier in the year the twosome was 
awarded a Gold Record for their “Bostella” reading, and during Carnival time 
they again scored with “De Fanfare” (La Banda). Currently they are making 
a big splash with the Dutch version of “La Felicidad,” which at the same time 
j has become a bestseller in the original Spanish version of Digno Garcia on 
k Palette, also released by Artone in Benelux. Both readings this week have 
appeared in the local Top Ten. Artone’s Willy Schobben, in the meantime, is 
-( racking up sales with his instrumental version of “La La La.” In the LP field 
Artone has released a second LP package by Pi Scheffer’s O.K. Wobblers 
,> entitled “It’s Charleston Time Again” presenting a selection of fourteen songs 
j from the Roaring Twenties. 

^ Following up on the current trend towards a rock ’n roll revival, Artone has 
i launched a sales drive on its complete repertoire of rock recordings including 
»,> original material by such artists as Chuck Berry (Chess), Major Lance (Epic), 
Little Richard (Specialty & Epic), and Larry Williams (Epic). New Epic re- 
i leases (LP), distributed in Benelux through Artone’s Funckler Records, in- 
*' elude packages by Lester Lanin, Bobby Vinton, the Doodletown Pipers, David 
■ Houston and the Village Stampers. Artone’s subsid Funckler further reports 
that “If I Were A Carpenter” by the Four Tops as well as their “Reach Out” 
album still are selling like hot cakes in the low lands. Since the Tops’ impres- 
sive local appearance at the Grand Gala in March, they can do no wrong. Cur- 
rent Tamla-Motown releases in Benelux: the Isley Brothers’ “Take Me In Your 
irwArms,” Marvin Gay & Tammi Terrell’s “Aint Nothing Like The Real Thing,” 
Martha Reeves & the Vandellas’ “I Promise To Wait My Love” and the 
^ Temptations’ “I Could Never Love Another.” 


Denmark's Best Sellers 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 


1 

2 

3 

5 

4 
7 

6 


6 Er De greven fra Luxemburg (Sind Sie der Graf von Lux- 
emburg) (Dorthe/Philips) Sweden Music AB, Sweden 
6 Congratulations (Cliff Richard /Columbia) Imudico A/S, 
Denmark 

5 Simon Says (1910 Fruitgum Co./Buddah) Dacapo Musikfor- 
lag, Denmark 

4 Jennifer Eccles (Hollies/Parlophone) Dacapo Musikforlag, 

9 What A Wonderful World (Louis Armstrong/ HMV) Chap- 
pel Nordiska AB, Sweden 

3 La, La, La (Teenmakers/Triola) Multitone A/S, Denmark 
1 Onsk mig til lykke (Gitte Haenning/HMV) 

1 A Man Without Love (Engelbert Humperdinck/Decca) 

10 Kaere lille Anna (Lille vakre Anna) (Five Tonnies/Oktav) 
Oktav Musik, Denmark 
1 Ha ha ha — Hee hee hee (Lollipops /CBS) 


Norway's Best Sellers 


1 1 

2 2 

3 4 

4 5 

5 7 

6 — 

7 3 

8 6 

9 8 

10 10 


8 Congratulations (Cliff Richard /Columbia) Arne Bendiksen 
A/S, Norway 

7 Det borjar verka karlek, banne mej (Claes-Goran Heder- 
strom/RCA Victor) Thore Ehrling Musik AB, Sweden 

6 La, La, La (Massiel/ Scan-Disc) Arne Bendiksen A/S, Nor- 
way 

2 What A Wonderful World (Louis Armstrong/ABC) Chap- 
pel Nordiska AB, Sweden 

4 Vi ska ga hand i hand (Dunja, Du) (Gunnar Wiklund/ 
Columbia) Hans Busch’s Musikforlag, Sweden 

1 Young Girl (Union Gap/CBS) 

5 Vi gratulerer (Congratulations) (Kirsti, Oddvar, Arne/Tri- 
ola) Arne Bendiksen A/S, Norway 

10 The Dock Of The Bay (Otis Redding/Atlantic) No publisher 

3 Jennifer Eccles (Hollies/Parlophone) Sonora Musikkforlag 
A/S, Norway 

2 Lazy Sunday (Small Faces/Pye) No publisher 


Sweden's Best Sellers 


1 1 

2 3 

3 5 

4 2 

5 7 

6 6 

7 10 

8 4 

9 — 

10 8 


7 Congratulations (Cliff Richard /Columbia) Thore Ehrling 
Musik AB, Sweden 

6 Simon Says (1910 Fruitgum Co./Buddah) Sonora Musikfor- 
lags AB, Sweden 

8 Vi ska ga hand i hand (Dunja, Du) (Gunnar Wiklund/iCol- 
umbia) Hans Busch’s Musikforlag, Sweden 

5 Kring de sma husen i grandema vid hamnen (Unter der rote 
Laterne von St. Pauli) (Anita Lindblom/CBS) Nils-Georgs 
Musikforlag AB, Sweden 

4 * Sagan om lilla Sofie (Hep Stars /Cupol) Sonora Musikfor- 
lag AB, Sweden 

4 Jennifer Eccles (Hollies/Parlophone) Sonora Musikforlag 
AB, Sweden 

3 Sa lange du alskar ar du ung (500 Miles Away From Home) 
(Hooten iSingers /Polar) Bens Music AB, Sweden 

9 *Det borjar verka karlek, banne mej (Claes-Goran Heder- 

strom/RCA Victor) Thore Ehrling Musik AB, Sweden 
1 Rock Around The Clock (Bill Haley/Decca) 

3 *Ga och gom dej, Ake Trak (Mona Wessman/RCA Victor) 
Thore Ehrling Musik AB, Sweden 
*Local copyright. 


Holland's Best Sellers 


1 5 

2 2 

3 10 

4 — 

5 — 

6 3 

7 1 

8 4 

9 6 

10 9 


If I Only Had Time (John Rowles/iStateside (Altona/Amsterdam) 
Lazy Sunday (The Small Faces/Immediate) 

La Felicidad (Digno Garcia /Palette, Johnny & Rijk/Artone, Eddy 
Becker /Poly dor ) ( Portengen / Haarlem ) 

I Can’t Let Maggie Go (Honeybus/Deram) (Deglo Music/Hilver- 
sum) 

Summertime Blues (Blue Cheer /Philips) 

Congratulations (Cliff Richard /Columbia) (Basart /Amsterdam) 
Jumbo/The Singer Sang His Song (The Bee Gees/Polydor) (Bas- 
art/ Amsterdam) 

II Est Cinq Heures, Paris s-Eveille (Jacques Dutronc/ Vogue) 
( Anagon / Heemstede ) 

Take Time To Know Her (Percy Sledge /Atlantic) (Basart/Am- 
sterdam) 

A Man Without Love (Engelbert Humperdinck/Decca) (Int. Mu- 
ziek Co. /Amsterdam) 


HOLLAND (Continued) 

Recent CBS additions to the singles field include Simon & Garfunkel’s hit 
single “Mrs. Robinson” as well as the latest single by the bestselling British 
top group the Tremeloes: “Helule, Helule.” Further, Gene Pitney’s latest “She’s 
A Heartbreaker” and a new single (culled from his latest album) by Ray 
Conniff & the Singers: “Love Is Blue.” Recent issues in the popular LP field 
include Miles Davis’ latest album, entitled “Nefertiti,” “Revolution” by Paul 
Revere and the Raiders. O. C. Smith with a live recording album and Nelson 
Eddy’s “Greatest Hits” featuring his greatest songs of the early 40’s. 

CBS also released an album by Kid Ory and His Creole Jazz Band contain- 
ing recordings from 1946-1950, San Remo Festival 1968: “12 Greatest Hits” 
including the winning entry by Roberto Carlos : “Canzone Per Te” as well as the 
famed and popular album by the Electric Flag (An American Music Band) 
entitled “A Long Time Cornin’.” CBS re-issued in the classical LP field the 
famous Carnegie Hall Concerts by Sviatoslav Richter, this album containing 
Beethoven’s Sonatas No. 3 in C Major, Op. 2 No. 3 and No. 7 in B Major, Op. 10, 
No. 3. 

On June 13, local TV broadcasted a 30 minute program by the New Christy 
Minstrels who were in Holland some time ago. The second half of their TV 
show will be aired later this year. 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


67 


1 




Arffeniina 


Mexico 


Miriam Makeba has been the visitor of the week in Buenos Aires after a long 
promotion campaign organized jointly by the Opera Theater (where she ap- 
peared) and Sicamericana who releases the Reprise label. Although most of her 
popularity is due to her chart-smashing “Pata-Pata,” there has been a strong 
interest towards other songs, including seme African and Brazilian themes. Be- 
sides the stage appearances, the artist has also recorded tapes for television 
and hosted a reception for the press and deejays at the Alvear Palace Hotel. 

Beatriz Lupo of Relay Publishers (who have the rights to this week’s top 
selling record “Honey” reports the list of recordings currently available or due 
in this market which include waxings by the Grupo Cinco (EMI), Ray Conniff 
(CBS), Lucio Milena (Disc Jockey), Los Walkers (Music Hall), Sandro (CBS), 
Tommy James (Groove), Barbara & Dick (RCA) and Hugo Marcel (RCA), The 
pubbery is also representing “La Bambola,” an Italian tune penned by Zam- 
brini-Migliacci-Cini, and recorded by Patty Pravo and Los Iracundos, both for 
RCA. 

CBS has released a new single by melodic chanter Chico Novarro with tunes 
“El Ultimo Acto” and “Amiga Mia” (both penned by him), a new single by top 
selling group Cuerteto Imperial, another by tango chanter Jorge Sobrel, and 
the cover of “The Legend Of Xanadu” by local group Los Naufragos. There is 
also an album by Georgie Fame, and a selection album with recordings by 
tropical music artists, along with another LP by the Cuarteto Imperial. 

RCA’s Los Gatos have been contracted for appearances in Las Vegas later 
this year. The group, currently holding the number three spot in the local 
charts and heavily menacing the upper places, will also represent this country 
at the next Rio de Janeiro Song Festival, and is currently recording songs in 
English for the countries speaking this language. They have also given a beat 
concert at the Payro Theater in Buenos Aires to SRO crowds. 

Disc Jockey’s Rosamel Araya is returning to TV, fulfilling a longtime con- 
tract with Channel 9. As in previous years, Rosamel will appear at the top 
rated “Special” program. It is worth mentioning that Rosamel is one of the 
best selling artists of this country, and one of his tunes, “Quemame Los Ojos,” 
has sold more than 600,000 copies, a fantastic amount for this market. 

Microfon’s Mario Kaminsky is working hard on the new Buddah releases, 
recently made available by his diskery in this country, including recordings by 
the Lemon Pipers and the 1910 Fruitgum Co. As we have reported before, the 
company will sell and distribute its product independently, after the termina- 
tion of its current contract with RCA. 


Argentina's Best Sellers 


This 

Week 

1 


2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 


9 

10 


11 

12 

13 

14 


15 


16 

17 

18 

19 

20 


Last 

Week 

4 Honey (Relay) Bobby Goldsboro (UA-CBS); Grupo Cinco (EMI) 
Ray Conniff (CBS); Lucio Milena (Disc Jockey); Walkers (Music 
Hall); Sandro (CBS); Tommy James, Barbara & Dick, Hugo 
Marcel (RCA) 

2 *Elstoy Celoso (Clanort) Palito Ortega (RCA) 

3 *Viento, Dile A La Lluvia (Fermata) Los Gatos (RCA) 

1 Llorona (P. Domain) Raphael (Odeon); Cuco Sanchez (CBS); 
Hugo Marcel (RCA) 

5 Digan Lo Que Digan (Fermata) Raphael (Odeon); Hugo Marcel 
(RCA) 

6 *Una Muchacha Y Una Guitarra (Melograf) Sandro (CBS) 

9 Things Nancy Sinatra/Dean Martin (Reprise-MH) 

7 Pata Pata (Odeon) Miriam Mekeba (Reprise-MH); Jack® Zeller, 
Cuatro Brillantes (CBS) ; Tony Fontan (Music Hall) ; Los Venetos, 
Hot Pickles (Disc Jockey) ; Zaima Beleno (Odeon) ; Claudios (Poly- 
dor) 

8 Love Is Blue (Korn) Paul Mauriat, Andre (Philips); Tony Fontan 
Sound and Co. (Music Hall); Beat Groove (RCA); Elio Roca 
(Polydor); Mr. Trombone (CBS) 

10 Cuando Sali De Cuba (Kom) Luis Aguile (CBS) Tony Fontan 
(Music Hall) ; Pepito Perez, Hot Pickles (Disc Jockey) ; Sandpipers 
(Fermata); Juan Ramon, Les Capricomes (RCA); Los Claudios 
(Polydor); Javaloyas (Odeon) 

11 Cuando M’Innamoro (Fermata) Engelbert Humperdinck (Odeon); 
Anna Identici, Sandpipers (Fermata); Gigliola Cinquetti (CBS) 

12 To Sir With Love (Melograf) Lulu, Christina (Odeon); Derek y 
Ray (Mercury); Tony Fontan (Music Hall); Popsingers (CBS) 

15 Vuelvo Sobre Mis Pasos The Foundations (Pye-MH) 

13 Ballad Of Bonnie And Clyde (Edami) Barbara & Dick (RCA); 
Georgie Fame (CBS); Johnny Hallyday (Philips); Franck Pour- 
cel (Odeon); Artesanos (Leroi); Soundtrack (Warner Bros.) 

17 La La La (Edami) Massiel (RCA); Caravelli (CBS); Fedra & 
Maximiliano (Disc Jockey); Caravelli (CBS); Mac Ke Mac’s 
(Ariel); Elio Roca (Polydor) 

16 Words Bee Gees (Polydor) 

— Un Color Para Esta Piel Olga Guillot (Music Hall) 

14 Canzone Per Te (Fermata) Roberto Carlos (CB,S); (CBS); Sergio 
Endrigo (Fermata); Elio Roca (Polydor); Andre (Philips) 

— Cuando Roberto Carlos (CBS) 

18 Lady Madonna (Fermata) Beatles (Odeon) 

*Local 


Argentinci's Top LP's 


This Last 
Week Week 

1 1 Digan Lo Que Digan — Raphael (Odeon) 

2 2 *Juguemos En El Mundo — Maria Elena Walsh (CBS) 

3 3 A1 Ponerse El Sol — Raphael (Music Hall) 

4 4 *E1 Impacto — Palito Ortega (RCA) 

5 5 Best Of — The Platters (Mercury) 

S — Los Hits En Castellano Vol. II — Adamo (Odeon) 

7 7 Los Hits Vol. I — Adamo (Odeon) 

8 6 Flower Power Vol. II — Selection (CBS) 

9 — . *Canta Boleros — Pepito Perez (Disc Jockey) 

10 8 A Mi Amor Con Amor — A. Manzanero (RCA) 

*Local 


d3 


Musart Records announced they have contracted famous Chilean vocalist 
Monna Bell, now living in Mexico, and considered one of the finest artists we . 
have. 

New female singer on the CBS label: ^ny Fuentes. Before departing to ^ 
Argentina for performances, she cut a single with the songs “No tengo a 
nadie” and “Telefoneando.” 

French singer Charles Aznauvour arrived in Mexico to perform at El Patio 
night club. Orfeon Records, which distributes his records in Mexico, immedi- 
ately released three long plays by him. 

Andre Toffel, A&R of Dusa Record Com.pany, informed us they have signed 
distribution contracts for the Smash and King labels. The first record which 
will be released is “Love Is All Around” vdth the Troggs.. 

Enrique Guzman released at his own label Acuario the songs “Las Rosas’*' 
and “I Say A Little Prayer.” Enrique is currently planning a TV show with 
actress and singer Silvia Pinal. 

Capitol Records released a new long play with new Mexican group Los 
Aliviadores. This album contains eleven of their own compositions among -which 
are: “Tema de los aliviadores,” “Bonita la noches,” “Refiexion,” “Dime,” 
“Tienes que volver,” “Cielo ajeno.” 

On the Eco label. Peerless released an album with popular rock and roll 
group Los Apson. Themes like “Tell Mama,” “I See The Light,” Green Tam- '■ 
bourine,” “Valleri” and others appears on this long play. 

Orfeon Records cut a 33% titled “Psicodelico a go-go, Vol. II” with various 
artists as Los Shakes, Los Hitter’s, Brenda y Bonny, Tono Quirazco, Los 
Flammer’s, Diego de Cosio and Los Strangers. On the Dimsa label, the same 
company released long plays with Brenda y Bonny, Los Hitter’s and Los 
Belmonts. 

Los Hermanos Castro, our best vocal group, just signed a two year contract 
with an English empresario to perform throughout Europe. There is also the ^ 
chance of their performing with the Beatles. 


Mexico's Best Sellers 


1 El Amor Es Triste (Love Is Blue) — Paul Mauriat (Philips). Paul Mauriat 
and the Pop Singers (Philips). A1 Martino (Capitol). Karina (Gamma). 
Matilde (Tico). Los Jaffa (Musart). Les Baxter (Tizoc). Claudine Longet' 
(Tizco). 

2 El Juego De Simon (Simon Says) — 1910 Fruit Gum Company (Kama- . 
sutra). Roberto Jordan (RCA). Los Rockin Devils (Orfeon). Jack Edmonds 
(Tizoc). 

3 Donde Estas Yolanda — Sonora Santanera (CBS). 

4 Muchachita (Young Girl) — Union Gap (CBS). Los Belmonts (Orfeon). 

5 Cuando Me Enamoro — The Sandpipers (Tizoc). Angelica Marfa (RCA). 
Pablo Beltran Ruiz (RCA). Sonora Veracruz (Orfeon). 

6 Mambo Del Taconazo— Perez Prado (RCA). ' 

7 Lady Madona — The Beatles (Capitol). Los Stranger’s (Orfeon). Los Cor- 
recaminos (Orfeon). 

8 Nadie Como Yo (Nobody But Me) — The Human Beinz (Capitol). Los Yaki 
(Capitol). Los Rockin Devils (Orfeon). Los Stranger’s (Orfeon). 

9 La Llorona — Raphael (Capitol). 

10 Quisiera — Raphael (Philips). 


Japan's Best Sellers 


This 

Week 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

This 

Week 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

This 

Week 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 


ALBUMS 

Last 

Week 

1 Sergio Mendez & Brazil ’66 — Sergio Mendez & Brazil ’66 (A&M) 

2 Satanic Majesties — ^The Rolling Stones (London) 

4 Walker Brothers In Japan — The Walker Brothers (Philips) ' 

3 Monkees Golden Album — The Monkees (RCA) 

5 Golden R&B — The Temptations (Motown) .i 

LOCAL 

Last 

Week 

1 Hoshikage-No Waltz — ^Masao Sen (Minoruphone) 

2 Koi-No Shizuku — Yukari Itoh (King) 

4 Isezakicho Blues — Mina Aoe (Victor) 

3 Yube-No Himitsu — Tomoko Ogawa (Toshiba) ^ 

6 Otaru-No Hito — Tokyo Romantica (’Teichiku) j 

— Koi-No Tokimeki — Tomoko Ogawa (Toshiba) J 

7 Satsuma-No Hito — Saburo Kitajima (Crown) I 

8 Ai-No Sono — Akira Fuse (King) | 

9 Tasogare-No Ginza — Los Primos (Crown) ’ 

— Shinjuku Sodachi — Y. Tsuyama & H. Ohki (Minoruphone) 

INTERNATIONAL ' 

Last 

Week ^ 

1 Hana-No Kubikazari — The Tigers (Polydor) Publisher /Watanabe ' 

3 Valleri — The Monkees (RCA Victor) Sub-Publisher/Shinko 

2 Kamisama Onegai! — The Tempters (Philips) Publisher/Tanabe 

4 Lady Madonna — The Beatles (Odeon) Sub-Publisher/ Toshiba 

5 Kanashikute Yarikirenai — The Folk Crusaders (Capitol) Publish- 
er/Pacific 

7 World — The Bee Gees (Polydor) Sub-Publisher/Aberbach Tokyo * 
9 Woman Woman — Union Gap (CBS) Sub-Publisher/Shinko 

8 Bara-No Koibito — The Wild Ones (Capitol) Publisher/Watanabe '' 

6 Anotoki Kimi-Wa Wakakatta — The Spiders (Philips) Publisher/ 

Top ( 

10 Nagai Kami-No Shojo — The Golden Cups (Capitol) Publisher/ 
Pacific 

12 Tell Me — The Rolling Stones (London) Sub-Publisher/Shinko 

13 Hakucho-No Uta— The Blue Comets (CBS) Publisher/Watanabe 

— Words — The Bee Gees (Polydor) Sub-Publisher/Aberbach Tokyo '' 

11 Massachusetts — The Bee Gees (Polydor) Sub-Publisher/Aberbach , 
Tokyo 

— Chiisana Snack — The Purple Shadows (Philips) Publisher/Shinko 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 



MUSICALLY SPEAKING. . . . 

THE GLOBE IS SHRINKING VERY RAPIDLY. 

INTERNATIONAL NEGOTIATIONS ARE A DAILY 
ACTIVITY. AND THEY HAVE BECOME AN 
INTEGRAL AND LUCRATIVE PART OF EVERY 
SUCCESSFUL MUSIC COMPANY. 

SO THINK INTERNATIONALLY WHEN YOU 
PLAN ON RUNNING YOUR NEXT AD! 

YOU’RE PROBABLY WELL AWARE OF THE 
FACT THAT YOUR CASH BOX AD IS REACHING 
THE DOMESTIC MUSIC MARKET. BUT 
ARE YOU ALSO AWARE OF THE IMPACT THE 
VERY SAME AD MESSAGE IS MAKING 
SIMULTANEOUSLY ON THE INTERNATIONAL MARKET? 

REMEMBER: THE WORLD MARKET READS EVERYTHING 
YOU SAY IN CASH BOX. 


Cash Box — ^June 15, 1968 


69 



COIN MACHINE NEWS 


EDITORIAL: Programming Amusement Games 


The practice of proper record programming for coin- 
operated phonographs has been preached and pro- 
moted at conventions, association meetings and in the 
trade magazines till many operators are blue in the face. 
It’s safe to say at this point that every intelligent operator 
keeps his eye on the new weekly releases, knows his 
individual locations’ preferences and gladly accepts re- 
quest tunes from his customers. Supporting the theory 
of conscientious record programming is that one undeni- 
able fact — the number of coins in the cash box rides side 
by side with the popularity of the music on the machine. 

These principles are directly analogous to the art of 
games programming as well. We call it an art because 
it takes quite a bit of talent and experience in this busi- 
ness to know which game to place on what location for 
maximum earnings. The obvious differences between 
record programming and amusement game selection 
and rotation are cost and size. But discounting the fact 
that it’s cheaper and easier to purchase and truck a new 
record to a location, the same axiomatic principles still 
apply — keeping an eye on all the new amusement games 
coming out of the factories, knowing your location pref- 
erences and, yes, accepting requests from these loca- 
tions for their favorites. 

While the life of a game normally exceeds that of a hit 
record, there are really very few ‘evergreen’ pieces that 
can earn money at any given location ad infinitum. Even 
pool tables, long board shuffleboards and the like must 
be replaced sometime — whether it be with a new or 
reconditioned game of the same class or something 
different. Let’s not forget that new games have one 
distinct advantage over records — they are immediately 
noticed by customers and automatically enjoy increased 
collections over their predecessors. 

Certainly to suggest that every amusement operator 
Institute a weekly game rotation system for the whole 
route is ridiculous. There’s not enough time available to 
the already busy operator and his crew to kill half the 
week lugging machines all over the place. But — the all 
too common practice of leaving a game so long that the 
location owner and the few dimes in the coin box force 
the operator to replace it is equally ridiculous. Every 
operating company must establish a game rotation sys- 
tem for this route — somewhere between the all or 
nothing methods mentioned above — something other 
than a hit and miss, trial and error procedure. 

The Ideal system is to keep a history of each game on 
the route. Take, for example, a shuffle alley. When you 
buy it, give it a “birth certificate’’ of some sort, say, an 
index card. After each collection, file the amount and 
the collection date on this card. Follow its progress at 
the first location. Before its popularity wanes, send the 
truck out with another game, take the first piece and 
move it to a different spot. Follow its earning scale close- 
ly and you’ll learn which locations do better with shuffles 
than others, which spots do well with them — provided 
you bring in a new model frequently enough and which 
have no need for them. 


Try experimenting with new game ideas. Unfortunate- 
ly, there’s nothing like a Top 100 popularity chart avail- 
able to notify operators of the real up-and-coming games 
so this “experimentation’’ is necessary. Take, for ex- 
ample, the World Cup. This was a new idea when it came 
out and although its success is coinbiz history by now, 
those operators with the foresight to latch onto a few 
right in the very beginning have made more money than 
the late-comers. Many new factories, trying to crack this 
business, come in spitting fire and enthusiasm. They’re 
really going to carve a big chunk out of the annual dollar 
output, they think. Months later they complain bitterly 
that out trade is just too stubborn to go near anything 
new. Well, certainly it’s a question of money, a question 
of the new factory’s service integrity but isn’t it also a 
bit of reluctance on our part? Let’s give every new game 
its fair chance. 

Thirdly, let’s start thinking about filling location re- 
quests. As wierd as this sounds, it just might be a good 
idea to encourage your customers to ask for a game they 
might have seen at some other spot or for the return of a 
piece that they liked last year. We remember one Bronx 
tavern had a ChiCoin Pop-Up game for several months. 
It was a new idea and it made a big hit. Lo and behold, 
another Pop-Up appeared at a bar down the street not 
long after, and this on a different route. The reason — 
the word got around via the customers and the second 
operator got the hint. Both games made money. 

The whole thing boils down to the old axiom — variety 
is the spice of life. Sure it’s hard work but if it provides 
hard currency, then it’s more than worthwhile. 


While our nation continues to shake its head in gen- 
uine astonishment at the spectre of yet another of our 
able leaders brutally struck down at the hands of a 
crazed assassin, the coin machine industry had to bear 
its own private tragedy last week with the news of Dave 
Sutherland’s accidental death. 

Like Sen. Kennedy, Dave was an active man who loved 
his work as dearly as life itself. While horseback riding 
at a Paola, Kansas stable last Sunday (June 2nd), Dave 
was thrown, suffered severe brain injuries in the fall and 
at 3:00 A.M. the following Tuesday, he died. He was 49. 

Dave qualified as a true veteran of the industry. An 
operator turned distributor, he literally blanketed much 
of the Midwest with his many Sutherland Distributing 
offices and actively ran each branch with his countless 
road trips throughout the network from his Kansas City 
headquarters. He will be sorely missed by us all. 

Many operators, factory representatives, competitive 
distributors and friends joined the Sutherland family at 
services last Thursday in the Overland Park Christian 
Church. Interment followed at the Johnson City Mem- 
orial Park. Dave is survived by his wife Doris, son David, 
Jr., Steven and William and brothers Bill and Byrd. 


70 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 






V Vegas Stars Love Big Bertha 


Sugerman }^sits Greek Coinmen 

'y 


^ World traveler, Myron Sugerman of Sugerman International, recently returned 
from a tour of Greece & Europe where he met with customers and foreign 
> representatives of his American firm. Shown in the above photo (left to right) 
which was taken in Athens, Greece are: Myron Sugerman, Nik Koukolias, 
^ managing dir. of M.S.I., Athens, Stella, who is the lovely lady escorted by 
Mr. Koukolias, Mr. & Mrs. Sakis Anagnostopolous, who is president of his 
■ *■ export-import firm by the same name, Mrs. Terry Anagnostopolous, sister-in- 
law of Sakis, Mrs. Clara Sugerman, wife of Myron and Mr. James Fragiskos, 
chairman of the board of directors of Onasis-Fragiskos, Int’l. 


NAMA Member 
Directory Out 

CHICAGO — A 92-page Directory of 
Members, listing all the member firms 
of the National Automatic Merchan- 
dising Association, was published last 
week, according to Thomas B. Hunger- 
ford, NAMA. executive director. 

Totally revised, the 1968 NAMA 
Directory lists some 2,200 vending and 
food service operating companies and 
branches, classified by state and city 
and indicating the products vendod 
by each company. Addresses and tele- 
phone numbers are also shown. 

“The NAMA Directory of Members 
is the only published list of vending 
operators and the firms listed account 
for an estimated 75 per cent of all 
vended sales in the United States 
today,” Hungerford said. 

In addition to the list of vending 
operators, the Directory contains sep- 
arate sections for machine manufac- 
turers and supplier companies which 
are members of the association. It 
also includes the association’s con- 
stitution and bylaws, as well as rosters 
of the board of directors, committee 
chairmen, and the staff of NAMA. 

The price of the book for non- 
members is $25 per copy. NAMA 
member firms are receiving the Di- 
rectory free of charge. Copies of the 
1968 Directory of Members are avail- 
able from NAMA, 7 South Dearborn 
Street, Chicago, 111. 60603. 


minutes to play with a potential of 
$4 per hour in collections.” 

Card-Pool is an original idea invent- 
ed by Haywood Whichard, who is a 
stockholder in the company, the units 
are manufactured in New Bern, N.C., 
with company offices in Greenville. For 
further information on the game and 
firm write to University Amusements, 
Drawer 2602, University Station, 
Greenville, N.C. 


Cig Taxes Seen 
To Benefit Boots 

NEW YORK — A story in the June 
3rd issue of the Wall Street Journal 
states that criminals have found a 
racket that raises its profits with a 
tax increase. The business in question 
is cigarette bootlegging. 

The Journal reported that until just 
recently a smuggler could rent a one- 
ton panel truck, load it with 40,000 
packs, or $12,400 worth of cigarets, in 
North Carolina, which has no state 
cigaret tax. Two days later he could 
sell them in New York for $18,000 
based on a general retail price of 47 
cents a pack, at a profit of $6,400. 
Bootleggers selling at wholesale net 
something less than that figure. 

On Saturday, June 1st, New York 
State raised its per pack tax to 12 
cents from 10 cents, in addition to a 4 
cent city tax and a 2 cent sales tax, 
increasing illicit profits on the same 
$12,400 investment to $7,200 — or a 58 
per cent profit. 

Bootlegging is greatest in New 
York, with the nation’s highest cigaret 
tax, where the state says it loses $40 
million annually and the city claims a 
loss of $10 million annually in tax rev- 
enue to cigaret smugglers. Police and 
industry officials say the problem 
plagues any state with higher-than- 
average taxes. Police and industry 
leaders also say, according to the ar- 
ticle, that tougher laws would help 
reduce bootlegging. Possession of 
bootlegged cigarets is a misdemeanor 
for a first offense, with second and 
subsequent offense penalties of $250 to 
$2500 fines and a six-month to one 
year jail sentences. Civil remedies of 
$25 per bootlegged carton can be 
levied, and counterfeiting cigaret 
stamps brings additional penalties. 

iSays one law enforcement official, 
“any plan that will make the tax col- 
lectible at the source has got to make 
a difference.” 


>■ UNION, N. J. — A complete 8-ball 
tournament kit, containing all tools 
y necessary for staging such contests 
within a single location or between 
several locations has been designed 
and is being manufactured and mar- 
^ keted by United Billiards, Inc. 

The kit contains a large-sized, dur- 
able score board (see cut) and several 
pieces of literature describing the 
rules of 8-ball tournament play, in- 

► 


eluding a large poster with step by 
step procedure all lined out. According 
to United’s president Art Daddis, the 
kit is designed to enable operators to 
carry the package into one of several 
of their locations, instruct their loca- 
tion owners in the concept and there- 
after leave the conduct of the contest 
in the hands of the proprietor. The kit 
can be obtained through any United 
Billiards distributor. 


’ BIG BERTHA INVADES VEGAS HOTELS . . . that’s Mr. Don Rickies insert- 
ing a dollar bill into the gaping mouth of Bally’s ‘Big Bertha’ fruit machine. 
+ IThis one’s located in the Hotel Sahara. That one on the right is getting a hard 
time from Miss Todie Fields. Miss Fields is a bit perplexed because she resents 
y the fact that Big Bertha is bigger than she is. Si Redd of Bally Distributing 
Co., Reno, who sent us the pictures said that they get a great deal of pleasure 
out of operating these large machines on a commission basis. Si also reported 
that he was selling Bally machines in Northern Nevada faster than the factory 
^ could produce them. 


University Amuse, 
Making 'Card Pool' 


“CARD POOL” 

GREENVILLE, N.C. — Ray Masten, 
president of University Amusements, 
Inc., revealed last week that his firm 
has started production on a pool table 
type amusement game called “Card- 
Pool.” The game is a regular pool 
table which has a total of 26 holes, 
all aces, kings, queens, jacks, tens, 
2 jokers and 4 deuces. Each player is 
allowed five balls which he shoots 
with a cue ball and stick attempting 
to make a poker hand by putting his 
five balls into the holes that will give 
him a higher poker hand than his op- 
ponent. “The best hand wins, there is 
no payoff and it is strictly a contest of 
skill between two players,” Masten 
said. 

According to Masten, the machine is 
32" X 62" X 32" high, weighs 150 
pounds and is made of marine hard- 
wood by experienced woodboat crafts- 
men. The playboard and rails are cov- 
ered with regular pool table cloth and 
the coin mechanism is a double dime 
slot. Masten said, “the game takes 3 


P. Q. ^^Streamlined^’ 


NEW YORK — ^A series of technical 
changes have been incorporated into 
the electrical and projection mecha- 
nism of Mondial’s ‘ Professor Quiz- 
master’ question & answer amusement 
game, according to the firm’s market- 
ing executive Dick Sarkisian, in order 
to provide operators “with the longest 
lasting, easiest-serviced quiz game on 
the market”. The major change has 
been the incorporation of a printed 
circuit, the machine’s ‘brain’, which re- 
portedly insures long life, and if neces- 
sary, easy replacement. The film reel 
itself has been modified to present less 
moving parts to the serviceman and 
easier change of question reels them- 
selves. The whole projection unit, with 
printed circuit, slides out from the 
front of the machine for complete ac- 
cessibility. 


United Unveiis S^Baii Tourney Kit 


Cash Box — ^June 15, 1968 


71 








4 ) 


ToTBI 



Actives 

THE CHOICE FOR 

the Lowest 
Prices 

•■d 

Best Equipment 

ALWAYS 


Exclusive Gottlieb, Rock-Ola, Fischer and Chi- 
cago Coin Distributor for Eastern Pennsylvania, 
South Jersey and Delaware. 


JiCTIVE Amusement Machines Co. 


666 No. Broad Street, Phila. 30. Pa. POplar 9-4495 
1101 Pittston Ave., Scranton 5, Pcnna. 


.^1^ 

ml Im ml ntt Tm 

jLL '' u//n 1 1 mn/ / 1 1 ^ ^ ^ — 

GashBoK Location Programming Cmde 

THIS WEEK'S TOP RECORD RELEASES FOR COIN PHONOGRAPHS 

AduU Locations 

Teen Locations ^ 

SURVEY LEADERS 

SURVEY LEADERS 

SATURDAY'S FATHER (3:14) 

HURDY GURDY MAN (3:15) 

THE 4 SEASONS 

DONOVAN 

Good-Bye Girl (3:14) Philips 40542 

Teen Angel (2:16) Epic 10345 


Dependability 
You Can Count On 

— for the finest new and 
reconditioned equipment 

BANNER 

Specialty Company 

1213-31 N. 5th St. 1508 Fifth Ave. 

Philadelphio, Pa. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

(215) 236-5000 (412) ^1-1373 


^ POOL lABLES '' 


COMPLETELY RECONDITIONED 
AND READY FOR LOCATION IN- 
STALLATION. NEW SLATE, CUES, 
BALLS, CUSHIONS & ACCESSORIES. 

FISCHER 


CROWN 100 $450 

CROWN 90 350 

EMPRESS 101 495 

EMPRESS 92 395 


KAYE 


MARK IV $450 

MARK III 350 


Terms: Vb deposit, Bal. Sight Draft or letter 
of credit 

BETSON ENTERPRISES 




3726 Tonnele Ave., North Bergen, N.J. 
Tel.: (201) UNion 4-2424 



Exclusive Rowe AMI Distributor 
Eo.Pa. - S. Jersey - Del. • Md. - D.C. 

llilVIll llUSlin Ini! 

855 N. BROAD ST.. PHILA., PA. 19123 
Phone: (215) CEntcr 2-2900 


Cinebox Converted To 

PEEP SHOWS 


Be the First in Your 
Territory With the 

HOTTEST 

Money-Maker Ever 


WITH PEN IN HAND (3:17) 

BOY (2:30) 

JERRY VALE 

LULU 

The Look Of Love (3:25) Columbia 44572 

Sad Memories (2:05) Epic 10346 

WHERE WERE YOU WHEN THE LIGHTS WENT OUT (1:33) 

THE LETTERMEN 


DONT TAKE IT SO HARD (2:27) 

PAUL REVERE & RAIDERS 

Love Is Blue-Greensleeves (2:15) Capitol 2218 

Observations From Flight 285 (2:48) Columbia 44553 


( Jt&JT ) 

FOLLOW-UP 

V y 

SURVEY LEADERS 

JUST A LIHLE BIT (3:24) 

TM A MIDNIGHT MOVER (2:25) 

BLUE CHEER 

Gypsy Ball (2:57) Philips 40541 

WILSON PICKETT 


Deborah (3:07) Atlantic 2528 

GOOD OLD MUSIC (2:50) 


PEOPLE SURE ACT FUNNY (2:10) 

PARLIAMENTS 

ARTHUR CONLEY 

Time (2:40) Revilot 223 

Burning Fire (2:20) Atco 6588 

STRONG POTENTIAL 

1 

SNOOPY FOR PRESIDENT (2:49) 

SAVE IT (2:12) 

SOLOMON BURKE 

ROYAL GUARDSMEN 

Meet Me In Church (3:33) Atlantic 2527 

Down Behind The Lines (3:27) Laurie 3451 

FOLLOW-UP 

SURVEY LEADER — The heading 'Survey Leader' refers to those artists 
and groups whose record releases normally enjoy healthy ploy on coin- 
operated phonographs (as determined by the Cosh Box Operator Sur- 
vey). New single releases by Survey Leaders, therefore, present the 
most promising programming material for jukebox locations. 

FOLLOW UP — ^The 'Follow-Up' title refers to artists and groups who hove 
enjoyed a recent chart hit and follow-up with a promising new release. 

ailability of the listed recordings 

WITH PEN IN HAND (3:32) 

BILLY VERA 

Good Morning Blues (2:57) Atlantic 2526 

check your local One Stop for av 



Top 100 
Chart Guide 


91 America 

James Brown— King 12413 

92 Sweet Memories 

Andy Williams— Columbia 44527 

93 Yes Sir, That's My Baby 
Baja Marimba Band— A&M 937 


The following list is compiled from the current 
Cosh Box Top 100 Chart. The new chart addi- 
tions are in numerical order as they broke 
onto the Top 100. 


95 You're Good For Me 
Lou Rawls— Capitol 2172 

96 With Pen In Hand 
Billy Vera— Atlantic 2526 


47 D. W. Washburn* 
Monkees— Colgems 1023 


99 Sealed With A Kiss 
Gary Lewis— Liberty 56037 


69 People Sure Act Funny* 
Arthur Conley— Atco 6588 


100 You Got Style 

Jon & Robin— Abnak 130 


71 The Story Of Rock 'N Roll* 
Turtles-White Whale 237 


* Indicates Chart Bullet 


75 Let Yourself Go* 

Elvis Presley— RCA Victor 9547 

77 Eleanor Rigby* 

Ray Charles— ABC 11090 

79 It's Nice To Be With You* 

Monkees— Colgems 1023 

80 Hurdy Gurdy Man* 

Donovan— Epic 10345 

83 Your Time Hasn't Come Yet, Baby* 
Elvis Presley— RCA Victor 9547 

87 Here Comes De Judge* 

Pigmeot Markham- Chess 2049 

88 Lovin' Season* 

Gene & Debbe— TRX 5010 

89 Whiskey On A Sunday* 

Irish Rovers— Decea 32333 


ml I ///■ ('.'.VV ///i»\\\ 

/AVn\T\ iT/m w 

CauhBoic 



ONE 

STOPPIN' 


East 

Tiny Tim’s “Tip Toe Thru The Tu- 
lips” (Reprise) is making noise all 
over Boston, but Herb Alpert’s “This 
Guy’s in Love With You” (A & M) is 
still the big juke record in that area 
. . . Conn, taverns and teen spots are 
giving nice play to Gary Puckett & 
Union Gap’s “Lady Will Power” (Co- 
lumbia) and Sam & Daves’ “You Don’t 
Know” (Atlantic) . . . Townhall Rec- 
ords reports Brooklyn Op’s are doing 


nice things with Elvis Presley’s 
“Your Time Hasn’t Come” (RCA) and 
“Here Comes The Judge” by Shorty 
Long (Soul) . . . Also doing nicely - 
and racking up a good jukebox fol- 
lowing is Merrilee Rush’s “Angel Of ^ 
The Morning” (Bell) especially in the 
New Jersey, New York and Penn, 
areas. ' 

Midwest 

Around Philadelphia Op’s are get- 
ting good play with several new Top 
100 tunes, leading the way is “Stoned 
Soul Picnic” by the 5th Dimension ^ 
(Soul City) and the Animals’ “Sky 
Pilot” (MGM). . . . Pittsburgh taverns > 
favor the Box Tops’ “Choo Choo 
Train” (Mala) and The Troggs “Love 
Is All Around” (Fontana). ... In the 
Ohio Valley it’s “Jumping Jack Flash” 
by the Rolling Stones (London) and 
“The Horse” by Bliff Nobles (Phila. 
A.). . . , “Indian Lake” by the Cow- ' 
sills (MGM), “Safe In My Garden” 
by the Mamas & Papas (Dunhill) and 
“Here I Am Baby” by the Marvellettes ^ 
(Tamla) are all racking up coins 
in the Indiana, Ohio, Michigan and 
Penn, areas. , . . Up Minnesota way - 
spots are favoring “Master Jack” by 
the 4 Jacks & Jill (RCA). . . . Missouri 
op’s say Ray Steven’s “Unwind” (Mon- 
ument) is one of the biggest money- 
earners they’ve ever bad in that area 
. . . out Kansas way “Sleepy Joe” 
by Herman’s Hermits (MGM) is get- 
(Continued oh next page) 


72 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 








r 




► 


► 

► 


► 

r 

► 

•Y 

>' 


V 


V 


> 






> 


i 

< 

•H 

H 




> 

> 


>i< 


’ r 


Goim Box profile on.- Bob LaValle— 


“Op’s Should Be Treated Like Dfs” 


Here are some very interesting and 
candid opinions from an extremely in- 
teresting fellow by the name of Bob 
LaValle, former Miami promotion man 
for Liberty records and present sales 
and promotion manager for the Cam- 
pus Record Distributing Corp., of 
Miami, Florida, an independent dis- 
tributing firm which is in the cor- 
porate family of Summit of Chicago, 
Universal Dist., of Philadelphia and 
Apex-Martin of New Jersey, Campus 
distributes A&M, Epic, Mercury, 
Buddah, Monument and Musicor in 
the state of Florida. 

LaValle, this week’s Cash Box Pro- 
file subject, left the cold New York 
winters and a sales position some 
three and one-half years ago for the 
warmer Miami climate and a job with 
Sunshine Records, from which he 
went to Liberty Records as a promo 
man, then on to Campus Records and 
his present position. 

Heading up the Miami-based Cam- 
pus operation is Joe Standione, a long 
time record-music man with a wealth 
of knowledge, experience and the know 
how required to use it to the best 
advantage. Another man in the Cam- 
pus complex is Ron Adams, a sales- 
man in charge of rack jobbers and 
one stops with a good working knowl- 
edge of operator music needs. Adams 
was formerly with the Handleman 
firm. 

What He Said 

“Operators should be handled the 
same way radio deejays are. They 
have to be made aware of the record 
product available — the information 
they receive on new releases is some- 
times limited and as a result of this, 
many of the operators are not pick- 
ing up on a new record when it has 
the most earning power.” 

“You ask what can be done? I can 
only tell you what we do here at 
Campus Records. We get information 
on all new releases out to the op- 
erators as soon as its available to us. 
We send out a mailing every two 
weeks to individual jukebox people — 
included in this mailing are copies of 
new releases, copies of our weekly 
charts that include information on 
what cities a particular record is 
getting good action in, and listings of 
all new record products. We also in- 
clude in the mailing a return form 
on which operators can send us sug- 
gestions and comments that might im- 
prove our service to them. In other 
words, the entire ‘thing’ is nothing 
more than an information fiow from 
us to them and back again. After an 
operator receives our material and 
information, they might go into their 
one stops and say, ‘hey, do you have 
this,’ hopefully, the one stop does 


One Stoppin' (iContinued) 

tin’ good action . . . reports from 
Nebraska indicate that one of the 
original sounds of Rock ’n Roll has 
regained a portion of it’s original pop- 
ularity. It’s Bill Haley’s “Rock Around 
The Clock” (Decca). Gene Pitney’s 
“She’s A Heartbreaker” (Musicor) is 
also getting good location play in 
Nebraska. 

South 

Miami nite spots are following up 
on both sides of Aretha Franklin’s 
“Think” and “You Send Me” (At- 
lantic) and “Reach Out” by Mind & 
Lover (Verve). . . . “People Sure Act 
Funny” by Arthur Conley (Atco) and 
“D. W. Washburn” by the Monkees 
(Colgems) are gettin’ good play in 
and around Georgia. ... New Orleans 
ops report that “I Love You” by the 
People (Capitol) and “A Man Without 
Love” by Englebert Humperdinck 
(Parrot) are both getting good play. 
. . . Down south Texas it’s “How’d 
We Get This Way” by Andy Kim 
(Steed) and “She’s Looking Good” 
by Wilson Pickett (Atlantic). 


have what the op asks for. If so, 
then our job is successful. If he does- 
n’t have it, then we hope he will get 
it for the operator, because after 
all, it’s his duty to service the op- 
erator.” 

“Do the one stops force operators 
to buy certain material ? I don’t think 
so. We discussed this issue at the 
FAMA meeting a few weekends ago, 
and I’ll tell you the same thing I 
said to them; If an operator requests 
a specific record from a one stop 
and it’s not available, then the one 
stop should make every attempt to get 
it. Many times, that particular record 
just might not be available. Now, 
I’m not telling an operator to go 
someplace where he can get the record 
and leave his one stop. ... I say 
he should try to understand that on 
occasion, a particular record simply 
isn’t available at the very moment 
an operator might request it. As a 
whole, the one stops are very co- 
operative with music operators. After 
all, why shouldn’t they be? They’re 
in the record business and operators 
buy records. So, naturally they want 
to sell the operator what he wants 
to buy. In the end, I say one stops 
make an honest attempt to give op- 
erators exactly what they want. How- 
ever, there may be a few isolated 


cases, but they are so few its not 
worth fussing about. I certainly don’t 
believe anyone is twisting anyone’s 
arm or placing a gun to anyone’s 
head. The entire issue was probably 
started because of a suggestion some 
one stop made to an operator — that 
failed to pan out. One stops have 
been serving operators for many years 
and they know pretty well what is 
good and what isn’t by now. They 
have their fingers on the pulse of 
the business and know what is going 
on. But, they make mistakes like any 
of us. The reputation of a one stop 
should not depend upon a few mis- 
takes in suggesting a potential rec- 
ord that just happened to be a big 
flop on the operator’s boxes.” 

We asked Bob for a comparison of 
the jukebox and the radio, the pro- 
motion and sales-stimulant values, 
he said, “I don’t think a jukebox 
can break a record nationally, but 
feel it plays an important role in a 
geographical area where any given 
record is not getting any air play. 
The sales figures of records to juke- 
box operators thru one stops in those 
areas greatly strengthen my argu- 
ment when I take that particular 
record into the radio pro^am di- 
rector and deejay. Many times, the 
radio will ignore those jukebox sales 


figures, but I try to impress upon 
them the importance of any kind of 
sales as proof the record is being 
listened to by the public. The juke- 
box does have a role.” 

Little LP’s 

One of the big question marks in 
this business of music programming 
for phonographs is the little LP. It 
has been talked about, kicked around, 
stepped on, promoted, demoted, criti- 
cised, praised and run up and down 
the proverbial flagpole as many times 
as ‘Old Glory’. We confronted La- 
Valle with the little LP issue and he 
responded something like: “From my 
point of view, I feel the little LP can 
be profitable to operators, if they 
would only give it a chance and pro- 
gram it on their boxes. In the past, 
I have heard people say that the li^ 
tie LP had one good tune and three 
or four pieces of garbage. Now, if 
you notice, in the last month’s Epic 
releases there was a marked improve- 
ment in the product offered, there 
were several million sellers on each 
little LP released. This seems to be 
what the operator wanted, now its 
up to us to get that information out 
to him. I remember hearing operators 
(Continued on next page) 


FLEETWOOD 

6-PLAYER AUTOMATIC 
BOWLING LANE 


Get MORE with 4 from CHICAGO COIN! 



ALL-STARS 


2-PLAYER 

BASEBALL 



6-PLAYER 
PUCK BOWLER 




CARNIVAL 

RIFLE 

GALLERY 

with 

SYNCHRONIZED 
SOUND- 
GUN FLASH- 
GUN RECOIL! 


of 

PROVEN 
II PROFIT MAKERS! 




CHICAGO COIN MACHINE DIV. 


CHICAGO DYNAMIC INDUSTRIES, iiuc 

^ 1725 W DIVERSEY BLVD., CHICAGO, lUINOlS 60614 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


73 



Biiotta Attends Baseball Draft 
Seeking Talent For Newark Co-PUots 


NEW YORK — Johnny Biiotta was in 
New York City last Thursday for 
the free agent draft of high school 
and college baseball talent. Biiotta, 
who is chairman of the Newark-Wayne 
County Baseball Committee, is the 
man who brought professional base- 
ball to Wayne county in the form of 
the Newark Co-pilots. The Class ‘A’ 
farm team of the newest entry in 
the American League, the Seattle 



John Biiotta (left) goes over a list of 
player names already selected at the 
free agent draft with Newark Co- 
pilots’ manager Sibby Sisti (right) 
former Boston Braves star. 

Pilots, will participate in the New 
York-Pennsylvania Minor League and 
will play their home opener in Newark 
against the Auburn Twins (Minnesota 
minor league team) on June 25th, just 
three days after the league opener 
against Geneva on June 22nd. 

Biiotta revealed that former Boston 
Braves star, Sibby Sisti, will manage 
the Newark club. He further revealed 
that Seattle farm director, Art Parrot 
will conduct spring training for the 
Co-pilots. Sisti, who played with the 
old Braves for 14 years said, “my wife 
and I were in Newark over the week 
end and think its one of the finest 
little communities we’ve ever been in. 
I’m looking forward to the season 
and expect to have a winning team 


in Newark. From all indications, 
Wayne county fans are ready to give 
us their complete support and we can 
thank the energetic Mr. Biiotta for 
that.” 

Marvin Milkes, general manager of 
the Seattle Pilots, praised Biiotta for 
his all out support and cooperation 
in bringing baseball to Newark and 
said, “we’ve got a lot of hard work 
ahead of us, but with a few breaks 
and the acquisition of some good ball- 
players we should have a good New- 
ark farm team that will supply us 
with wellgroomed major league play- 
ers.” Biiotta came in to say, “that’s 
the reason we named the Newark club 
the Co-pilots, someday these Co-pilots 
will become Pilots and play in the 
major leagues.” 

By the end of the draft more than 
1,000 players were expected to be 
selected by the 20 major league teams 
plus the four new entries Montreal, 
Seattle, San Diego and Kansas City. 

Each of the 20 teams now playing 
selected one man in the first round. 
Each of the 20 Class AAA farm clubs 
selected one man and each of the 20 
Class AA teams selected one man. 
Seattle and the Newark Class A rep- 
resentatives finally got a chance to 
select in the next round. However, 
they had to follow the original 20. 
Seattle and Newark was number 22 
in this round and number 82 in the 
overall draft. 

Those players selected to date that 
will stock the Newark club are pitch- 
ers, Larry Bright, Ron Brown, Ron 
Lea, Joe Mills and Dave Tallman. 
Catcher, Nelson Staley, first baseman 
Chuck Malitz and third baseman, Lee 
Carson. 

This draft is not to be confused 
with the expansion draft to be held 
in October by which Seattle will be 
stocked with players currently on big 
league teams. 



American League Seattle Pilot’s club officials are shown here at the Americana 
Hotel in New York City at last week’s baseball draft of high school and col- 
lege ball players, (left to right) Mr. Marvin Milkes, general manager of 
Seattle, John Biiotta, chairman of the Newark-Wayne County Baseball Direc- 
tors (Newark Co-Pilots), Scout, John Hill, Art Parrot, Seattle farm director, 
Sibby Sisti, manager of the Newark class ‘A’ club. Bill Skiff, scout and Jim 
Kittilsby, Seattle coordinator and Milkes right hand man. Missing from the 
picture is former pitching great, Sal Maglie who is Newark’s pitching coach. 


PROFILE 

(Continued from page 73) 
say at the MOA show last year that 
the little LP was not profitable to 
program and I understand this was 
because the little LP did not offer 
the music their customers wanted to 
hear. Well, now I think the trend is 
moving towards what they were voic- 
ing, better music in the way of past 
hits offered in a neat little package 
called a little LP. Now, we have to 
make him aware of the product avail- 
able.” 

“That’s one of the little problems in 
every industry — a lack of good solid 
communications — Once an effective 
communciations system is formed, 
everyone makes money. In our case, 
the manufacturer, the distributor, 
the one stop and the operator will 
make money. Good communications 
comes in many forms. I recently got 
a call from Paul Yost down at Florida 


One Stop. Paul had a request from 
an operator for a record that he didn’t 
have. He asked if I had the record 
and fortunately I was able to get a 
few copies, I sent them right down 
to him. Now, the operator that re- 
quested the tune must have had a few 
locations that wanted it, he got the 
record and didn’t lose out on any 
extra play — he made money. That’s 
an effective communications systems 
— so you see ... it can be done.” 

We think it can be done, too. Bob, 
and commend you on your efforts to 
bridge this existing gap in the flow 
of information. Maybe, with men like 
Bob LaValle and a large number of 
others, along with national, state and 
local associations (from both sides of 
the industry) there will be a flow of 
information, to and fro, that will be 
as effective as the Bell System. That 
will be a day to celebrate! 


y/ // V\V /y// 

mmmmmm. 

CashBox 

/ '7/ w\\ //v ^W\ l/// 


'Round tho Route 


\ 


Eastern Flashes 

KENNEDY — The tragedy of the 
Robert Kennedy murder struck many 
of the coinmen we spoke with late 
last Thursday pretty hard, evoking 
such comments as “this country s go- 
ing crazy” and “only in America. But 
as the President stated, one man, not 
200 million, performed the black deed 
and to lose faith in ourselves 'would 
be as evil as the assassination itself. 
But it’s ironical that the gun control 
legislation required the slaying of 
three of this country’s foremost lead- 
ers to get across — ironical in the re- 
spect that our pingames are still har- 
assed in many areas of this country 
and they don’t do a blessed bit of 
harm to anyone. However, such are 
the facts of life. 

SUTHERLAND— Many in the trade 
made the sad journey out to Kansas 
for the funeral of Dave Southerland 
last Thursday, to pay tribute to one 
of the finest gentlemen ever to grace 
the brief history book of this industry. 
"We hesitate to mention names of those 
of Dave’s friends who attended, for 
fear of omitting a few. Instead, let’s 
just quote Ron Gold’s fitting remark 
that Dave “was the finest gentlemen 
I’ve ever done business with.” 

FORE — Irv Morris, Suren Fesjian and 
Buckey VanWyke recently spent a fine 
weekend up at the Columbia Hotel in 
Hurleyville, N.Y.— Millie McCarthy’s 
stamping grounds. Irv tells us they 
all went out golfing with some other 
guests and later that night presented 
Suren with a fine trophy for his ex- 
ploits on the links— For Highest Score. 
Wonder why Irv was laughing? 

GONE FISHING— The Trimount lads, 
Irv Margold and Marshall Caras, took 
off on a six-day fishing trip to the 
wilds of Canada with some friends 
and customers recently, but we haven’t 
received any sports reports on who 
caught what. One thing Marshall 
caught — the first vacation in the last 
14 years. . . . Rowe’s Jim Newlander 
currently enjoying his first week in 
Europe on month long vacation. 

CONGRATS — Mr. and Mrs. Mickey 
Greenman ( Color- Sonics) had the 
especial honor of watching their son 
Lyle 'graduate Magna Cum Laude from 
C. W. Post College last Wednesday 
afternoon. Lyle, who also won the 
award for “Most Significant Contribu- 
tion to Psychology by an Undergrad- 
uate,” will be attending Adelphi Uni- 
versity in the fall on a full scholar- 
ship, courtesy of a U.S. Dept, of 
Health gTant. That’s quite an achieve- 
ment and are his parents proud. 

CIG ITEMS — Just to compound the 
already confusing cigarette picture 
in the city, there’s a movement on 
among a goodly percentage of smok- 
ers here to buy their cartons via the 
mails from a North Carolina tobacco 
distributor. The system works like 
this: A friend gives you a mailer 
directed to Weldon Cigarettes, Inc. 
of Weldon, N.C. You check off the 
brand you like (only two cartons per- 
mitted at a shot) enclose a check or 
money order for approximately $5.75 
and within a two-week period the 
smokes are returned, postage included. 
Not only are the smokes that much 
cheaper than the retail (and naturally 
the vending) price, but it all seems 
perfectly legal. Should this continue 
to grow, something must be done to 
protect the interests of the already 
burdened New York City cig merchant. 
Shouldn’t, as many have already de- 
manded, that all smokes be taxed at 
the source some way or other? 

HERE AND THERE — Expect action 
on the New York State Amusement 
within two weeks, according to Millie 
McCarthy. The bill, which has passed 


both houses of the Legislature, now 
awaits the Governor’s signature. . . . 
Mondial’s exciting Professor Quizmas- 
ter machine, now equipped with a 
streamlined electrical printed circuit, 
is a real joy on location — both service 
wise and collection wise, reports Dick 
Sarkisian. The unit is now also being 
offered on dime play. . . . Vending 
operators take note: the Florida Auto- 
matic Merchandising Council holds 
their annual meet Friday, June 14th 
at the Everglades Hotel in Miami; 
the Jersey Council holds its meeting 
at the Holiday Inn in Atlantic City 
also the 14th & 15th. The New York 
Vending Association met this past 
weekend at the Lido Beach Hotel on 
Long Island. . . . Congrats to Elmer 
Daniels, just appointed to head up 
ARA’s recreation and concessions divi- 
sion. 


Houston Happenings 

Southwest Record Distributors, 3806 
Irvington Blvd., Houston, together 
with subsidiary company, Houston Ac- 
tion Distribution, 3804 Irvington, ap- 
parently justified in their slogan: 
“Handling the Best in iSpanish”. “The 
Horse”, by Cliff Nobles is outstanding 
of current local hits with “Don’t Let 
the Stars Gets In Your Eyes” by 
Little Joe and Latinaires on Tear Drop 
label and “I’d Love To Live With You 
Again” by iDarrell McCall on Wayside, 
due honorable mention. The combine is 
owned by C. F. Lee with Mary Arre- 
dondo and Ray Doggett as managers 
and Mel Moran promotion and sales 
manager. Moran also is head of audi- 
tions and recordings for Teardrop rec- 
ords. . . . Not often mentioned is local 
operator Billy R. Allen who already 
has gone far in the business and defi- 
nitely is still going. . . . Hershel Ham- 
lin, sales representative, H. A. Franz 
& Co. (Seeburg) was personally con- 
cerned about rains of flood proportions 
that recently drenched the city. Her- 
shel owns a fine home in the Northeast 
section and too close for comfort to 
an area where 75 homes were evacu- 
ated because of high water. Hanpy to 
report that his property escaped dam- 
age. . . . Plenty of glamor (and busi- 
ness sense too) added to Allied Re- 
corded Sound, Inc. Houston office when 
little Marlene Kerr took over as chief 
receptionist. Allied Recorded Sound is 
generally regarded as the outstanding 
wholesale outlet for all types of tape 
and kindred accessories. Houston of- 
fice is managed by Alan Goldfield. . . . 
Ricky Poncio, son of Steve Poncio, 
owner United Record Distributors, 
bearing down ( ? ? ) learning the busi- 
ness since his dad, also national sales 
manager for a prominent record label, 
is away most all time. . . . Lee Loren- 
zotti, owner Pelican Vending Co., 
Galveston, in city shopping for vend- 
ing equipment and component parts. 
. . . Another out of towner evidently 
interested mainly in vending stuff was 
Joe Baine, Baine Amusement in Beau- 
mont. . . . Billy Rider, with Central 
Sales Inc. (Rowe AMI) and hobby- 
wise inclined to buy any antique from 
gold coins to beer mugs, seemed to 
have gotten right foot in wrong stir- 
run on old time player pianos. Loaded 
with the commercial type but of the 
home type, for which there is a big 
demand at slot machine profit, Billy 
has nary a one. . . . Numerous and 
reliable reports are that the “Hemis- 
Fair ’68 in San Antonio has directly 
increased profits of the coin operated 
machine industry in that city. The ex- 
position, with built in International 
and World Wide appeal, has had ex- 
tensive advertising (on all Texas ’68 
auto license plates for one). Distribu- 
tors and operators reportedly coop- 
erated in promotions. 

The H & H Music Company has 
added record departments to their 
other stores and now has complete 
record facilities in all four outlets. 
The new department manager is Harry 
McLendon, formerly the other store 
manager at Gulfgate. 


A 

A 


-7r 




i 


I 




<1 


i 

-f 






<. 1 




74 


Cash Box — ^June 15, 1968 




Mmm 

CashBoK 

' WWW 

\58TO7 ^SIk ?7 


Round the Route 


Y 


Chicago Chatter 



FRAN’S BAR in downtown Oglesby, 
r Illinois, gets a new Seaburg Spectra! 
Fran (left) is shown here with Jack 
Moyle of Clyesdale Music admiring 
the newly installed Spectra. Fran’s 
y Bar is the most popular bar in this 
midwestern city. 

V 

The O’Hare Inn became the gather- 
ing place for Innkeepers and Tavern 
owners from throughout a five state 
area during the first annual Mid- 
American Tavern and Innkeepers Ex- 
y position June 4-6. Some thirty-six ex- 
hibitors displayed the various types of 
equipment and the latest in new prod- 
ucts and services for the tavern in- 
dustry to conventioneers and guests to 
inspect. Actual attendance figures 
were not available at presstime but 
are representative of R & M Produc- 
tions, firm that conducted the show, 
y advised that 20,000 announcements 
were mailed out prior to the conven- 
tion. . . . Herb Jones and the crew at 
Bally Mfg. are singing the praises of 
‘Dixieland’ which seems to be creat- 
^ ing all sorts of excitement in the trade. 

. . . William Herleman, president of 
jv the Wurlitzer Co., will be the featured 
speaker at the upcoming meeting of 
the National Association of Young 
Music Merchants, to be held during the 
y 67th Annual Music Show at the Con- 
rad Hilton Hotel June 23. 

Chet Gore of Exhibit Supply Co. is 
enjoying much success with his cur- 
rent card series line, especially the 
newly introduced ‘Beach Bunnies’ and 
► ‘Sports Cars’. He also advised that the 
plastic laminating vendor, compact 
size, is a very strong item for him. . . . 
Got the word from Midway Mfg. mar- 
keting chief Ross Scheer that the fac- 
tory will be closed for vacation from 
July 24-August 2. However, the sales, 
parts, and service staff will remain on 
>V the job to serve Midway customers 
y during this period. . . . The vending 
I,. Dept, at World Wide Distributing is 
1 exceptionally busy these days. Irv 
A Ovitz, Frank Gumma and Jules Mill- 
man report tremendous reaction to the 
June factory participation special, 
^ which offers an attractive break-in al- 
lowance on each .Seeburg ‘Marquee’ or 
‘Top Hat’ coffee or cold drink machine, 
^ purchased during the month of June. 
. . . Workmen are near completion of 
the D. Gottlieb & Co. plant addition in 
Northlake, 111. In fact, Alvin Gottlieb 
anticipates occupancy by late July or 
early August — so he really has his 
hands full overseeing things at North- 
lake and trying to keep pace with the 
^ fast moving ‘Funland’. . . . NAMA’s 
Steve Polcyn sends word that the as- 
sociation’s 1968 Directory of Members, 
the only printed listing of vending op- 
erators available, is off the presses 
and ready to go. . . . iSeveral Atlas 
Music Co. staffers spent a large part 
of last week at the O’Hare Inn, man- 
^ ning the Atlas booth during the Tav- 


ern Exposition. On display were the 
Rowe AMI Music Master, PhonoVue, 
and the Bally ‘World Cup’. . . . Things 
are plenty busy at Williams Elec- 
tronics, Inc., firm’s enjoying lots of ac- 
tivity with current lineup topped by 
‘Lady Luck,’ ‘Aqua Gun,’ ‘Alpha’ and 
‘Coronade.’ . . . Local coinbiz was sad- 
dened by the news of the sudden death 
of Dave Sutherland in Kansas. Wil- 
liams’ Billy DeSelm, a close friend as 
well as business associate, was among 
those of this area who attended fun- 
eral services. 


Milwaukee Mentions 

Nate Victor up at the London Dist. 
office, just delighted with his six- 
month sales figure on iSeeburg Spectra 
phonos. . . . June is always a very busy 
month at Hastings Dist. Co. and, if 
the first week is any indication, this 
year will be no exception. Jack Hast- 
ings notes a big surge in over-all sales 
and exceptional action these past 
weeks on the current Rock-Ola line of 
phonographs! A welcome hand at the 
shop right now is Jim Hastings, who’s 
on vaction from college and working 
full time. Incidentally, we hear Jim’s 
golf score has improved immeasurably 
— he shot a 55 in 9 holes last Monday! 
How about that! . . . The Milwaukee 
Coin Machine Assn, held its monthly 
Board of Directors meeting last Tues- 
day with association prexy Sam Hast- 
ings presiding. . . . Talked to Joel 
Kleiman at Pioneer Sales & Services, 
where the center of excitement seems 
to be phonographs, with emphasis on 
the Rowe-AMI “Music Master” and 
“PhonoVue.” Also in big demand these 
days, according to Joel, are the cold 
drink and coffee machines. . . . John 
Jankowski of Radio Doctors tells us 
several new releases have started 
catching on with local operators. 
Among them Elvis Presley’s latest 
“Your Time Hasn’t Come Yet Baby” 
(RCA), “Already It’s Heaven” by 
David Houston (Epic), “Whiskey On 
A Sunday” by the Irish Rovers 
(Decca), “Girl Watcher” by The 
O’Kaysions (ABC) and “Mr. Sand- 
man” by Burt Kaempfert (Decca). 


Midwest Musings 

Al. Klammer, St. Paul Op. suffered 
some injuries riding a motorcycle. 
Lost a couple of fingers but lucky that 
was the extent of injuries . . . Mr. & 
Mrs. Gordon Wornson, Mankato, in the 
cities for the day on a shopping tour 
. . . Doc Keintz in town for the day 
making the rounds. iSpent four days 
in the hospital, ulcer flare up again 
but now has them under control . . . 
Dan Butler, Northwest Amusement 
Co. Winipeg, in the cities for a few 
days on a buying trip . . . Earl Ackley 
in town for the day buying records 
and parts . . . Cab Anderson in the 
cities for a few hours on a buying 
trip . . . Bob Carlson, Duluth, stopping 
in town for a few hours enroute with 
his family to San Antonio for a few 
days and then driving to Los Angeles. 
Will be gone for about a month . . . 
CongTatulations to Mr. & Mrs. Steve 
Lieberman on the arrival of a new 
baby Boy, Wednesday morning 29th. 
Steve was passing out cigars at the 
office . . . Loren Daniel in town for a 
few hours buying records and parts . . . 
The Schroeders from Aberdeen, S. D. 
were in town the early part of the 
week to see the Twins play . . . Fred 
Dahlin, St. Paul operator bought the 
route of the late Owen Bjorgum . . . 
The Fritz Einchinger’s are still vaca- 
tioning in Florida. . . . With the miser- 
able weather we are having in the 
Twin cities, can’t blame them . . . Op- 
erator’s in the north country are look- 
ing forward to a very good tourist 
season, providing the weather starts 
warming up. . . . 



EMPRESS 

Series ^^HiAcAeA^ 


All the fine features you e^ect from the ultimate 


New trouble free, 
field tested mech- 
anism drawer. most serious players. 


Model 105-D 105" X 59" 
Model 92-D 91" x 52" 


in coin^op" billiard equipment. 


. ■■ 

See your Distributor 
or write: ’ 


/ 


FISCHER MANUFACTURING CO.JNC. 

TIPTON, MO. 6B081 



RECONDITIONED SPECIALS GUARANTEED 

IN STOCK— SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE 


BALLY 

BANDWAGON, 4-PI $325 

2-IN-l 220 

BUS STOP, 2-PI 21 S 

GRAND TOUR 170 

HARVEST 180 

MAD WORLD, 2-PI 210 

BULL FIGHT 210 

DISCOTEK, 2-PI 260 

50/50, 2-PI 240 

MAGIC CIRCLE 235 

TRIO 250 

WILLIAMS 

FOUR ROSES $135 

JUMPIN' JACK 175 

DOUBLE PLAY 195 


CHICAGO COIN 

TV BASEBALL $325 

BULLS-EYE BASEBALL 370 

BIG LEAGUE 295 

PAR GOLF 180 

HULA HULA 325 

MIDWAY 

CAPTAIN KID $420 

TROPHY GUN 210 

RIFLE CHAMP GUN 250 

MONSTER GUN 295 

MYSTERY SCORE 185 


( 



Write tor complete 1968 Catalog of 
Phonographs, Vending and Games. 
Bstablished 1934 


ATLAS MUSIC COMPANY 


Cable: 

ATMUSIC — Chicago 

,2122 N. WESTERN AVE., CHICAGO, ILL. 60647. ARmitage 6-50051 


Deepening shades of night are falling, 
it's DEADLINE time! 


LAST CALL for 1968 DIRECTORY ADS 



NOW DELIVERING 



AQUA GUN ^ 




EUECTROIMICS, INC. 

3401 N. California Ave. • Chicago, III. 60618 • Cable Address Wilcdin Chicago 
Available For Immediate Delivery Through Your Williams Distributor 


i 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


75 





4 


COIN MACHINE INVENTORY LISTS— USED EQUIPMENT ' 

A Compilation of Phonographs and Amusement Machines Actively Traded On Used Coin Machine Markets — New Machines Are Listed In Various Issues. 


ROWE AMI 
MUSIC MACHINES 
0-40, '51, 40S*I. 

0- SO, '51, 80 Sel. 

E-40, '53, 40 Sel. 

£-80, '53, 80 Sel. 

E-120, '53, 120 Sel 
£-40, '54, 40 Sel. 

F-SO, '54, 80 Sel. 

F-120, '54, 120 Sel. 

G-80, '55, 120 Sel. 

G-120, '55, 120Sel. 

G-200, '56, 200 Sel. 

H-120, '57, 120 Sel. 

H-200, '57, 200 Sel. 

1- 100M, '58, 100 Sel. 
1-200M, '58, 200 Sel. 

1-200E, '58, 200 Sel. 

J-200K, '59, 200 Sel. 
J-200M, '59, 200 Sel. 
J-120, '59, 120 Sel. 
K-200, '60, 200 Sel. 

K-120, '60, 120 Sel. 
Continental '60, 200 Sel. 
Lyric, '60, 100 Sel. 
Continental 2, '61, 200 Sel. 
Continental 2, '61, 100 Sel. 
L-200, 160, 100 Sel. '62-63 
M-200 Tropicana '63-64 
N-200 Diplomat '65 
0-200 Bandstand '65 


1436, '52, Fireball, 120 Sel. 
I436A, '53, Fireball, 120 Sel. 
1438, '54, Comet, 120 Sel. 
1446, '54, HiFi, 120 Sel. 

1448, '55, HiFi, 120 Sel. 

1452, '55, 50 Sel. 

1454, '56, 120 Sel. 

1455, '57, 200 Sel. 

1458, '58, 120 Sel. 

1465, '58, 200 Sel. 

1475, '59, 200 Sel. Tempo I 
1468, '59, 120 Sel. Tempo I 
1485, '60, 200 Sel. Tempo II 


ROCK-OLA 

1478, '60, 130 Sel. Tempo II 

1495, '61, 200 Sel. Regis 
1488, '61, 120 Sel. Regis 

1496, '62, 120 Sel. Empress 

1497, '62, 200 Sel. Empress 
1493, '62, 100 Sel. Princess 
408, '63, 160 Sel. Rhapsody I 
404, 63, 100 Sel. Capri I 
418-SA '64 160-Sel. Rhapsody II 
414, '64, 100 Sel. Copri II 

425, '64, Grand Prix 160 Sel. 


PINGAMES 

BALLY 

Acapulco (5/61) 

Barrel-O-Fun (9/60) 
Barrel-O-Fun '61 (4/61) 
Barrel-O-Fun '62 (11/61) 
Beauty Contest (1/60) 

Bongo 2P (3/64) 

Bounty (Bingo) (10/63) 

Bus Stop 2P (1/65) 

Campus Queen 4PL (8/66) 
Can-Can (10/61) 

Circus Queen (2/61 ) 
Cue-Tease 2P (7/63) 

Funspot '62 (11/62) 

Flying Circus 2P (6/61) 

Folies Bergeres Bingo (11/65) 
Grand Tour IP (7/64) 

Happy Tour IP (7/64) 
(Add-A-Ball Model) 

Golden Gate (6/62) 

Harvest IP Pin (10/64) 

Hay Ride IP (10/64) 
(Add-A-Ball Model) 
Hottenany (Pin) IP (11/63) 
Laguna Beach (3/60) 

Lido (2/62) 

Lite-A-Line (2/61) 

Mad World 2P (5/64) 

Monte Carlo IP (Pin) (2/64) 
Moonshot (3/63) 

Queens (Bch., Is.) (3/60) 
Roller Derby (6/M) 
Ship-Mates 4P (2/64) 
Shoot-A-Line (6/62) 

Silver Sails (11/62) 

Sky Diver IP (4/64) 

Star Jet (Pin) 2P (12/63) 
Sufers IP (1/68) 

3-In-Line 4P (8/63) 
Touchdown (11/60) 

Twist (11/62) 

2 in 1 2P (8/64) 

Trio IP (11/65) 

Band Wagon 4P (5/65) 

Sheba 2P (3/65) 

Border Beauty Bingo (2/65) 
Bullfight IP (1/65) 

Mogic Circle IP (6/65j 
50/50 2P (8/65) 

Beauty Beach Bingo (5/65) 
Aces High 4P (9/65) 

Discotek 2P (10/65) 

Big Chief 4P (10/65) 


CHICAGO COIN 
Par Golf (9/65) 

Gold Star Shuffle (7/65) 

Big League Baseball 2P (4/65) 
Preview Bowler (9/65) 

Sun Valley (8/63) 

Firecracker 2P (12/63) 

Bronco 2P (5/64) 

Royal Flash 2P (8/64) 

Mustang 2P 
Festival 4P (1/67) 


KEENEY 
Old Plantation (2/61) 
Black Dragon 
El Rancho Haciendo 
Rainbow (6/62) 
Go-Cart IP 5/63) 
Poker Face 2P (9/63) 


MIDWAY 
Rodeo 2P (10/64) 

Premier Puck Shuffle (4/66) 
Mystery Score (8/65) 
(Novelty Game) 

Fun Ball Baseball (1/67) 


WILLIAMS 

A-Go-Go 4P (5/66) 
Alpine Club IP (3/65) 
Aztec Bowler (9/66) 

Beat The Clock (12/63) 
Big Chief 4P (10/65) 

Big Daddy IP (9/63) 

Big Deal IP (2/63) 

Black Jack IP (1/60) 
Bowl-A-Strike IP 12/65) 
Coquette (4/62) 

Darts IP (6/60) 

Ding Dong IP (2/68) 
Eager Beaver 2P (5/65) 

El Toro 2P (8/63) 

Four Roses IP (12/62) 

Full House IP (3/66) 
GIdn. Gloves IP (1/60) 
Heat Wave 1 P (7/64) 
Jolly Roger 4P (12/67) 
Jumpin' Jacks 2P (4/63) 
Jungle IP (9/60) 

Kingpin (9/62) 

Lucky Strike IP (8/65) 
Magic Town IP (2/67) 
Magic City (1/67) 

Mardi Gras 4P (11/62) 
Merry Widow 4P (10/63) 
Moulin Rouge IP (6/65) 
Music Man 4P (8/60) 
Nags IP (3/60) 

Oh, Boy 2P (2/64) 
Palooka IP (5/64) 

Pot O Gold 2P 
Riverboat IP (9/64) 

San Francisco 2P (5/64) 
Soccer IP (3/64) 
Serenade 2P (5/60) 

Skill Pool IP (6/63) 
Spaceship 2P (12/61) 
Teacher's Pet IP (12/65) 
Tom-Tom 2P (1/63) 

Top Hand IP (5/66) 

Trade Winds (6/62) 
Twenty-One IP (2/60) 
Valiant 2P (8/62) 
Vagabond (10/62) 

Viking 2P (10/61) 
Whoopee 4P (10/64) 
Wing-Ding IP (12/64) 
Zig-Zag IP (12/64) 


SEEBURG 

M100A, '51. 100 Sel. 

M100B, '51, 100 Sel. 

M100BL, '51, 100 Sel. Light Cob 
M100C, '52, 100 Sel. 

HF100G, '53, 100 Sel. 

HF100R, '54, 100 Sel. 

V200, '55, 200 Sel. 

VL200, '56, 200 Sel. 

KD200H, '57, 200 Sel. 

L100, '57, 100 Sel. 

201, '58, 200 Sel. 

161, '58, 160 Sel. 

222, '59. 160 Sel. 

220, '59, 100 Sel. 

Q-160, '60. 160 Sel. 

Q-100, '60, 100 Sel. 

AY1005, '61, 160 Sel 
AY1005, '61, 100 Sel. 

OS 160, '62, 160 Sel. 

DS 100, '62. 100 Sel. 

LPC-1,63, 160 Sel. 

LPC-480, '63, 160 Sel 
Electro '65, 160 Sel. 


WURLITZER 

1250, '50, 48 Sel., 45 or 78 RPM 
1400, '51, 48 Sel... 45 or 78 RPM 
1450, '51, 48 Sel., 45 or 78 RPM 
1500, '52, 104 Sel., 45 or 78 Inter- 
mix 

1500 A, '53, 104 Sel., 45 & 78 In- 
termix 

1600, '53, 48 Sel., 45 & 78 Inter- 
mix 

1650, '53, 48 Sel. 

I6S0A, '54, 48 Sel. 

1700, '54. 104 Sel. 

1800, '55, 104 Sel. 

1900, '56, 200 Set. 

2000, '56, 200 Sel. 

2100, '57, 200 Sel. 

2104, '57, 104 Sel. 

2150, '57, 200 Sel. 

2200, '58. 200 Sel. 

2204, '58, 104 Sel. 

2250, '58. 200 Sel. 

2300, '59, 200 Sel. 

2304, '59. 104 Sel. 

2310, '59, 100 Sel. 

2400, '60, 200 Sel. 

2404, '60, 104 Sel. 

2410, '60, 100 Sel. 

2500, '61,200 Sel. 

2504, '61. 104 Sel. 

2510, '61, 100 Sel. 

2600, '62, 200 Sei. 

2610, '62, 100 Sel. 

2700, '63, 200 Sel. 

2710, '63, 100 Sel. 

2810 Stereo-Mono., 100 Sel. 

2800 Stereo-Mono., 100 Sel. 

2900. '65, 200 Sel. 


GOHLIEB 

King of Diamonds IP (1/66) 
Mayfair 2P (6/66) 

Central Park IP {A/ 66) 
Masquerade 4P (2/M) 

Ice Review IP (12/65) 

Ice Show (Add-A-Ball-Model) 
Aloha 2P (11/61) 

Bank-A-Ball IP (9/65) 

Big Casino (IP (7/61) 

Big Top IP (1/64) 

Bonanza 2P (6/64) 

Bowling Queen IP (8/64) 
Buckaroo IP (6/65) 

Captain Kidd 2P (7/60) 

Corral (9/61) 

Cover Girl 1-Plyr. (7/62) 
Cow-Poke IP (5/65) 

Diamond Jack, Add-A-Ball 
Dancing Lady 4P (11/66) 
Dneg. Dolls IP (6/60) 

Dodge City 4P (7/65) 

Egg Head IP (12/61) 

Fashion Show 2P (6/62) 
Flipper IP (11/60) 

Flipper Clown (4/62) 

Flipper Cowboy IP (10/62) 
Flipper Fair IP (11/61) 

Flipper Parade (5/61) 

Flipper Pool IP (11/65) 

Flying Circus (6/61) 

Foto Finish IP (1/61) 

Flying Chariots 2P (10/63) 
Gaucho 4P (1/63) 

Gigi IP (12/63) 

Happy Clown 4P (11/64) 

Hi Dolly 2P (5/65) 

Kewpie Doll IP (10/60) 

Sky Line IP (1/65) 

Lancer 2P (8/61) 

Liberty Belle 4P (3/62) 
Lite-A-Card 2P (3/60) 
Majorettes IP (8/64) 

Melody Lane 2P (9/60) 
Mry-Go-Round 2P (12/60) 
Miss Anabelie IP 8/59) 

North Star IP (10/64) 
Oklahoma 4P (2/61) 

Olympics IP (9/62) 

Paradise 2P (11/65) 

Preview 2P (8/62) 

Royal Guard IP (1/68) 
Rock-A-Ball IP (12/62) 

Sea Shore 2P (9/64) 

Seven Seas 2P 1/60) 
Showboat IP (4/61) 

Super Score 2P (3/67) 

Surf Side 2P (12/67) 

Kings & Queens IP (3/65) 
Slick Chick IP (4/63) 
Spinwheel 4P (3/68) 
Spot-A-Card IP (3/60) 

Sunset 2-player (11/62) 

Sweet Hearts 1 P (9/63) 

Swing Along 2P (7/63) 

Texan 4P (4/60) 

Thoro-Bred 2PL (2/65) 

WId. Beauties IP (260) 

World Fair IP (5/64) 


SHUFFLES-BOWLERS 
BALLY Shuffles 

ABC Bowler (7/55) 

Jumbo Bowler (9/55) 

King Pin Bowler (9/55) 

ABC Spr. Del. (9/57) 
All-Star Bowling (12/57) 
All-Star Deluxe (2/58) 

Lucky Shuffle (9/58) 

Star Shuffle (10/58) 

Speed Bowler (11/58) 

Club Bowler (2/59) 

Club Deluxe (5/59) 

Monarch Bowler (11/59) 
Official Jumbo (9/60) 
Jumbo Deluxe (9/60) 

1965 Bally Bowler 
All The Way (10/65) 


Ball Bowlers 

ABC Bowl, Lane (1/57) 

ABC Tournament (6/57) 
ABC Champion (10/57) 
Strike Bowler (11/57) 
Trophy Bowler (4/58) 

Lucky Alley (8/58) 

Pan American (6/59) 
Challenger (9/59) 

Super Shuffle (12/61) 

Big 7 Shuffle (9/62) 

Super 8 (4/63) 

Deluxe Bally Bowler (1/64) 


CHICAGO COIN Shuffles 
Top Brass Shuffle (4/65) 
Triple Strike (2/55) 

Arrow (2/55) 

Cr. Cross Targette (1/55) 
Bonus Score (4/55) 

Hollywood (5/55) 

Blinker (8/55) 

Score-A-Line (9/55) 

Bowling Team (10/55) 

Rocket Shuffle (3/58) 

Explorer Shuffle (6/55) 
ReBound Shuffle (12/M) 
Championship (11/58) 

Double Feature (12/58) 

Red Pin (2/59) 

Bowl Master (8/59) 

4-Game Shuffle (11/59) 

Bull's Eye Drop Ball 
(12/59) 

6-Game Shuffle (6/60) 

Triple Gold Pin Pro 
(2/61) 

Starlite (5/62) 

Citation (10/62) 

Strike Ball (5/63) 

Spotlite (11/63) 

DeVille (8/64) 

Triumph (1/6^ 

Bel Air Puck Bwir. 


Ball Bowlers 

Super-Sonic Bowler (3/65) 
Bowling League (2/7) 

Ski Bowl 6P (11/7) 
Classic (7/7) 
rV Bowling Lg. (11/7) 
Lucky Strike (1/58) 

TV (with rollovers) 
Player's Choice (9/58) 
Twin Bowler (10/58) 

King Bowler (3/59) 

Queen Bowler (9/59) 

Duke Bowler (8/60) 
Duchess Bowler (8/60) 
Princess (4/61) 

Gold Crown (3/62) 

Royal Crown (8/62) 

Grand Prize (3/63) 
Official Spare Lite (9/63) 
Cadillac Bwlr (1/64) 
Majestic Bowler (8/64) 
Tournament (12/64) 
Imperial (9/66) 


SHUFFLES-BOWLERS 
UNITED Shuffles 

Encore Puck Shuffle (9/66) 
Amazon Bowler (3/66) 
Blazer Shuffle (6/66) 

Tango Shuffle (2/66) 

Clipper (5/55) 

5th Inning (6/55) 

Capitol (6/55) 

Super Bonus (9/55) 

Deluxe model 
Top Notch (10/55) 
Regulation (11/55) 

6-Star (10/7) 

Midget Bowling ((3/58) 
Shooting Stars (4/58) 

Eagle (5/58) 

Atlas (8/58) 

Cyclone (10/58) 

Niagara (11/58) 

Dual (1/59) 

Zenith (6/59) 

Flash (6/59) 

3- Way (9/59) 

4- Way (12/59) 

Big Bonus (2/60) 

Sunny (5/60) 

Sure Fire (10/60) 

Line-Up (1/61) 

5- Way (5/61) 

Avalon (4/62) 

Silver (6/62) 

Shuffle Baseball (6/62) 
Action (7/62) 

Embassy (9/62) 

Circus Roll-Down (9/62) 
Lancer (11/62) 

Sparky (12/62) 

Caravelle (2/63) 

Crest (4/63) 

Rumpus Tarquette (5/63) 
Astro (6/63) 

Ultra (8/63) 

Skippy (11/63) 

Jill-Jill (11/63) 

Bank Pool (11/63) 

Topper (2/64) 

Tempest (2/64) 

Pacer (4/64) 

Tiger (7/64) 

Orbit (8/64) 

Mambo (12/64) 

Cheetah Shuffle (3/65) 
Pyramid (6/65) 

Corral Shuffle (10/65) 


Ball Bowlers 

Bowling Alley (11/56) 
Jumbo Bowling (9/7) 
Royal Bowler (12/7) 
Pixie Bowler (8/58) 
Duplex (11/58) 

Simplex (5/59) 

Advance (5/59) 

League (10/59) 
Handicap (11/59) 
Teammate (12/59) 
Falcon (4/60) 

Savoy (5/60) 
Bowl-A-Rama (9/60 
Tiptop (10/60) 

Dixie (1/61) 

Cameo 5-Star Bowling 
(5/61) 

Classic (6/61) 

Alamo (4/62) 

Sahara (7/62) 

Tropic Bowler (9/62) 
Lucky (11/62) 

Cypress (12/62) 

Sabre (2/63) 

Regal (4/63) 

Fury (8/63) 

Futura (12/63) 

Tornado ((3/64) 
Thunder (6/64) 

Polaris (8/64) 

Galleon (3/65) 
Bowl-A-Rama (7/65) 


WILLIAMS Boll Bowlers 
Maverick Bowler (11/65) 
Oasis Bowler (6/65) 
Roll-A-Ball 6P (12/56) 
Matador Bowler (12/M) 


UPRIGHTS 

AB Circus (5/56) 

AB County Fair (3/57) 
AB Circus Wagon 
Wheels (12/58) 

AB Galloping Dominos 
AB Circus Play BaU 
(4/59) 

AB Mogic Mirror 
Horoscope (11/59) 


AB Mermaid (3/60) 
Aquati Prod. Squoits 
(11/7) 

B Jumbo (5/59) 

B Sportsman (6/59) 

B Jamboree (10/60) 

B Super Jumbo (11/60) 
CC Star Rocket (5/59) 

GA Skeet Shoot (1/7) 
GA Super Hunter (6/57) 
GA Double Shot (4/58) 
GA Wild Cat (12/58) 

GA Spr. Wild Cat 
GA Twin Wild Cat (7/59) 
GA Super Wild Cat 
Trail Blazer (12/60) 

Twin Trail Blazer (2/61) 

K Big Tent 

K Spr. Big Tent (6/7) 

K Shawnee (1/59) 

K Big Roundup (3/59) 

K Little Buckeroo (4/59) 

K Del. Big Tent (5/59) 

K Big 3 (5/59) 

K Touchdown (9/59) 

K Big Dipper (10/59) 

K Twin Big Tent 
Criss Cross Diamond 
(1/60) 

K Red Arrow (4/60) 
Sweet Shawnee '60 
Black Dragon '60 
K Twin Red Arrow 
(5/60) 

K Flashback (6/61) 


ARCADE 

ABT 6 Gun Rifle Range 
Air Football 
Air Hockey 
Auto Photo Model 9 
Amer. Shuffle Situation 
(5/61) 

B Undersea Raider 
B Derby Gun (2/60) 

B Bulls Eye Shooting 
Gallery (9/55) 

B Big Inning (5/58) 

B Heavy Hitter (4/59) 

B Ball Park (4/60) 

B Sharpshooter (2/61) 

B Golf Champ (8/58) 

B Bat Practice (8/59) 

B Skill Roll (B 3/58) 

B Moon Raider (7/59) 

B Target (10/59) 

B Spook Gun (9/58) 

B Skill Parade (1/59) 

B Skill Score (6/60) 

B Skill Derby (10/60) 

B Del Skill Parade 
(4/59) 

B Table Hockey (2/63) 

B Spinner (2/63) Novelty 
B Bank Ball (1/63) 

B Fun Phone (3/63) 

Capitol Midget Movies 
CC Ace Machine Gun (11/67) 
CC Bullseye Baseball 
CC Basketball Champ 
CC-4-Player Derby 
CC Goalee 
CC Midget Skee 
Super model 
CC Big League (5/55) 

CC Twin Hockey (5/56) 

CC Shoot The Clown 
CC. Stm. Shovel (5/56) 

CC Batter Up (4/58) 

CC Criss Cross 
Hockey (10/58) 

CC Croquet (8/58) 

CC Playland Rifle 
Gallery (8/59) 

CC Pony Express (4/60) 

CC Ray Gun (10/60) 

CC Wild West (5/61) 

CC Long Range Riflle 
Gallery (1/62) 

CC All-Star Baseball 
(1/63) 

CC Big Hit (10/62) 

CC Pro Basketball (6/61) 

CC Riot Gun (6/63) 

CC Champion Rifle 
Range (1/64) 

CC Popup (10/64) 

Ex Gun Patrol 
Ex Jet Gun 
Ex Space Gun 
Ex Pony Express 
Ex Six Shooter 
Ex Shooting Gal. (6/54) 

Ex Star Shtg. Gal. (9/54) 

Ex Sportland Shooting 
Gallery (11/54) 

Ex "500" Shooting 
Gallery (3/55) 

Ex Treasure Cove 
Shooting Gal. (6/55) 

Ex Jungle Hunt (3/7) 

Ex Ringer Ball (11/56/ 

Ex Pop Gun (9/7) 

Ge Lucky Seven 
Ge Sky Gunner 
Ge Night Fighter 
Ge 2-Player Basketball 
Ge Rifle Gal. (6/54) 

Ge Big Top Rifle 
Gallery (6/54) 

Super model (12/55) 

Ge Gun Club 

Ge Wild West Gun (2/55) 

Ge Sky Rocket Rifle 
Gallery (5/55) 

Ge Championship 
Baseball (9/55) 

Ge Quarterback (10/55) 

Ge Hi Fi Baseball (5/56) 

Ge State Fair Rifle Gal. 

(6/56) 

Ge Davy Crockett (10/56) 

Ge Circus Rifle (3/7) 

Ge Motorama (10/7) 

Ge Gypsy Grandma 
(5/7) 

Ge Gun Fair (5/58) 

Ge Space Age Gun (6/58) 


Jungle Joe 
Ke Air Raider 
Ke Sub Gun 
Ke Sportland DeLuxe 
model 

Ke Ranger (3/58) 

Deluxe Model (3/55) 

Grand Slam Baseball 
(2/64) 

Ke League Leader (4/58) 

Ke Sportland 
Ke Two-Gun Fun (3/62) 

Mid Red Ball (5/59) 

Mid Joker Ball (11/59) 
Midway Bazooka (10/60) 
Midway Shooting 
Gallery (2/60) 

Mid. Del. Baseball (5/62) 
Mid. Flying Turns (9/64) 2P 
Play Ball IP 

Mid. Little League B13 (1966) 
Mid Target Gallery 
(7/62) 

Mid. Cam. Tgt. GIry. 

(2/63) 

Mid. Slugger BB (3/63) 

Mid. Rifle Range (6/63) 

Mid. Raceway (10/63) 

Mid. Winner 2P (12/63) 

Mid. Top Hit BB (3/64) 

Mid. Trophy Gun BB (6/64) 
Captain Kid Rifle (9/66) 

Mills Panorama Peek 
(11/54) 

Munves Bike Race (5/58) 
Munv. Sat. Trkr. (5/59) 

Mu Atomic Bomber 
Mu Ace Bomber 
Mu Dr. Mobile 
Mu Fly Saucers 
Muto Lord's Prayer 
Mu Photo (Pre-Vifar) 

Mu Photo (DeLuxe) 

Mu Silver Gloves 
Mu Sky Fighter 
Muto Voice-O-Graph 
Pre-War Model 
Post-War Model 
Mu K. O. Champ 
Mu Drive Yourself 
Mu Bang-O-Rama (4/7) 
Philadelphia Toboggan 
Skee Alley 
Scientific Pitch 'Em 
Seeburg Bear Gun 
Seeburg Coon Hunt 
Set Shot Basketball 
Southland's Speedway 
(6/63) 

Southland Fast Draw '63 
Southland Time Trials 
(9/63) 

Telequiz 
Un Jungle Gun 
Un Cam. Gun (10/54) 

Un Bonus Baseball (3/62) 

Un Bonus Gun (1/55) 

Un Star Slugger (7/55) 

Un Spr. Slugger (4/56) 

Un Pirate Gun (10/56) 

Un Yankee BB (3/59) 

Un Sky Raider (10/58) 

Wm. Del. BB (4/53) 

Wm. Major Leaguer 
Wm. Big Lg. BB (2/54) 

Wm. Jet Fighter (10/54) 

Wm. Safari (2/54) 

Wm. Polar Hunt (3/55) 

Wm. Sidewalk Eng (4/55) 
Wm. King of Swat (5/55) 
Wm. 4-bagger (4/56) 

Wm. Crane (10/56) 

Wm. Penny Clown 
(12/56) 

Wm. 1957 Baseball 
Wm. 10-Strike (12/7) 

Wm. Ten Pins (12/7) 

Wm. Shortstop (4/58) 

Wm. Pinchhitter (4/59) 

Wm. Vanguard (10/58) 

Wm. Hercules (2/59) 

Wm. Crusader (6/59) 

Wm. Titan (8/59) 

Wm. Del. Bat. Champ 
(5/61) 

Wm. Extra Inning (5/62) 
Wm. Viforld Series (5/62) 
Wm. Road Racer (5/62) 

Bally Champion Horse 
Bally Moon Ride 
Wm. Official Baseball 
(4/60) 

Wm. Major League (3/63) 
Wm. Voice-O-Graph 1962 
Wms. Mini Golf (10/64) 
Wms. Hollywod Driving 
Range (4/65) 

Double Play BB (4/65) 

KIDDIE RIDES 
Bally Champion Horse 
Ball Mon Ride 
Pony Twins 
Bally Space Ship 
Bally Speed Boat 
Bally Tnrvle. Trolley 
Bert Lane Lancer Horse 
Bert Lane Merry-Go- 
Round 

B.L. Miss America Boat 
Bert Lane Fire Engine 
B.L. Whirlybird (3/61) 

B.L. Moon Rocket (3/61) 
Capitol Donald Duck 
Capitol Elsie 
Capitol Palomino Horse 
Capitol See Saw 
Chicago Coin Super Jet 
Chicago Round The 
World Trainer 
Deco Merry-Go-Round 
Deco Space Ranger 
Exhibit Big Broncho 
Exhibit Mustang 
Exhibit Sea Skates 
Exhibit Space Patrol 
Scientific Television 
Scientific Boat Ride 
Texas Merry Go-Round 
Exhibit Rudolph The 
Reindeer 


V'-’ 


•< 


■f 

yi 








-A 





76 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 


SPONSORS AND WINNERS IN LONG ISLAND 8-BALL TOURNEY 




>■ 

>■ 

V 

y 

rv 

► 

V 

V- 


► 


fy 

V 


► 

V 

'V 


> 


“>• 


!»► 

-•v 



The participating operators are: (1. to r.) Bill Fritz, Jimmy Mathews, Sid Congratulating the big winner. (L. to r.) Mr. Commissioner Ben Spaulding 
Michelow, Sherwood Schwach, A1 Needleman, Walt Conde, Vic Vanderleenden U.S. Billiards prexy A1 Simon, winner A1 Roche and Lenny Schneller, present 
and Bill Kohler. ing Roche with $1,000 check. 



Operator Ronny Billings (left) presents ‘B’ Class A1 Needleman (left) with ‘C’ division winner Woman’s division winner Diane Desmond (second 

winner Dave Curtis (center) with his check for Bill Banks (center). Bill also copped $250 check. from left) with the Mathews Brothers. 

$500. 


MELVILLE, LONG ISLAND— The 
grand four-day 8-ball playoff, which 
climxaed in the Electrician’s Union 
Building Hall Wednesday evening 
(May 29th) with the awarding of 
V trophies and prize money, has made 
a lasting impression upon the tavern 
owners and customers involved in the 
' contest— they all want another. 

This tourney, sponsored by eight 
^ of the Island’s amusement operating 
companies and U.S. Billiards, Inc., was 
^ the first ever attempted in this area 
on this scale (an estimated 5,000 spec- 
tators witnessed all or part of the 
tourney). To say it achieved a success 
. would be an understatement. Even re- 


porters from Long Island’s two major 
dailys described it as ‘phenominal.’ 

A total of $5,000 in prizes were dis- 
persed to the 32 winners (eight in each 
division), some of which are pictured 
above. A more complete list of the 
winners ran in last week’s issue of 
Cash Box. 

Len Schneller, pioneer and master 
mover of the tournament, advised that 
the operators have more or less settled 
upon next fall for the second Long 
Island playoff. Meanwhile, Schneller 
will be hitting the trails in reply to a 
good number of other operator groups 
throughout the country who desire to 
stage a similar contest. 


i 





X. 

t 

> 

-y 




Northwest W*mds Up Promo Tour 


Fitting finale for Ron Pepple’s Northwest Sales Nassau Promotion. Pictured 
here on the Pineapple Terrace of the Nassau Beach Hotel enjoying the menu 
and mood music are, from the left: Estelle Palmer, Ron Pepple, Marshall and 
Alice McKee, Hazel Pepple, A. D. Palmer, Jr., and an assemblage of the hotel’s 
serving personnel and musicians. Looks like everybody really lived it up. 


// you are reading 
someone else's copy of 

Cash Box 

why not mail this coupon 


today 



CASH BOX 
1780 BROADWAY 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 10019 


Enclosed find my check. 

□ $25 for a full year (52 weeks) subscription (United 
States, Canada, Mexico) 

□ $45 for a full year (Airmail United States, Canada, 
Mexico) 

□ $55 for a full year (Airmail other countries) 

□ $35 for a full year (Steamer mail other countries) 


Please Check Proper 
Classification Below 
MY FIRM OPEItATES THE 
FOLLOWING EQUIPMENT: 

JUKE BOXES □ 

AMUSEMENT GAMES □ 

CIGARETTES □ 

VENDING MACHINES □ 
OTHER 


NAME 

FIRM 

ADDRESS 

CITY STATE 


ZIP # 


Be Sure To Check Business Classification Above! 


Cash Box — ^June 15, 1968 


77 




COIN MACHINES 
WANTED 


/V ANTED: Tusko Elephant, Indian Scout, Ar- 
cade Equipment. Seeburg 160 Wailboxes; 
AMI WQ 200-3 Wailboxes with accumulator, 
AMI H, I, J, K, L 200; Seeburg DS-160, AY- 
160, 222 W Dual Pricing, Back Gloss for 
Melody Lone, Chi. Coin Pro Shuffie, Dolphin. 
Coll or write Cleveland Coin I'nal., 2025 
Prospect Ave., Cieve., Ohio. Phone: (2161 
861-6715. 


WE ARE CONSTANT BUYERS OF ALL AMUSE- 
ment machines ond surplus spare parts 
for same . . . Write MAX LOBO & CO., 
MEIR, 23, ANTWERP. BELGIUM. 


WANT: 16MM & 8MM films, audio video ma- 
chines; shuffleboards, shuffleboard scoring 
units, personol music equipment. Write stot- 
ing moke, model, condition and best cash 
price. St. Thomas Coin Sales, 669 Talbot 
Street, St. Thomas, Ontario, ^nado; Area 
519 — 631-9550. 


wanted TO BUY: KICKER AND CATCHER 
gomes, also other penny games, can use 
Ploylond Rifles. RELIABLE COIN MACHINE 
CO., 1433 W. Sherwin Ave., Chicago, III. 


WANT TO BUY USED AND NEW PINBALL 
GAMES, ADDABAL one & two players every 
kind of models MFD 1964, 1965, 1966 and 
also guns, bowlers, arcade, make offer to 
Robert Mouro, ELECTROPHON, VIA MEL- 
CHIORRE 6I01A 41a. MILANO (ITALY). 


WE ARE ALWAYS INTERESTED IN USED AND 
uiiuiid new phonograpns, pinbalis, bingos, 
guns, arcade, kiddie rides, slot machines, 
etc., all mokes, all models. QUOTE FOB 
SEA VESSEL TO HOLLAND BELGIE EUROPE, 
SPRL., 276 AVENUE LOUISE, BRUSSELS 5, 
BELGIUM. CABLE: HOBELEUROP/BRUSSELS. 


WANT TO BUY: ALL TYPES OF COUNTER 
Games. All Makes and Models. Quontiry 
available and price. Cash waiting. LOWELL 
ASSOCIATES, 2401 W. BALTIMORE ST., 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 21223. TEL: (301) 
947-3785. 


WANTED TO BUY OUT SELLING STOCKS ONE 
or two years old Jennings slot machines, 
Wurlitzer juke boxes and Pinball games two 
or four players, make on offer to AUTOMAT- 
TJANST N STORGATAN 19 BJUV, SWEDEN. 


COIN MACHINES 
FOR SALE 


FOR SALE — Cineboxes at $600.00 apiece with 
20 films. Can be put on 40 film play. FOB 
American Music Machine, 57 S. Penn St., 
York, Pa. CALL: 843-6201. 


FOR SALE: Gottlieb: Hi Dolly, Mayfair, Central 
Pork, King of Diamonds, Sweethearts, Swing 
A Long; Williams: Hot Line, Full House; 
Midway Shooting Gallery; United: Falcon 
B/A. D&L COIN MACHINE CO., 414 KELKER 
ST., HARRISBURG, PA. (717) 234-4731. 


LATE MODELS SEEBURG AND ROCK-OLA 
Phonographs at lowest prices. DAVE STERN, 
SEACOAST DISTRIBUTORS, 1200 NORTH 
AVENUE, ELIZABETH, N.J. 


SLOT/FRUIT MACHINES FROM £40 ($112). 
All makes, models. Manual, Electric. Avail- 
able English 6d only. Secondhand pintables, 
juke boxes, amusement machines, cheap, 
suitable for developing countries. HALEL 
ENTERPRISES LTD., 182A, NEW NORTH 
ROAD, LONDON, N. 1. ENGLAND. 


FOR SALE— SLICK CHICK-MID. 2 PL RACE- 
woy-Wm. Bear The Clock-bally — Beauty 
Contest, Beach Beouty, Ice Frolics, Varietys, 
Bright Lights — 6 card Frolics, 6 card Show- 
boots-UN. Starlets — Bally Surf Clubs & At- 
lontics. NOBRO NOVELTY CO., 142 Dore 
St., Son Francisco, Calit. 


CHANGERS— NEW HAMILTON CHANGERS— 
25t and 30c Below wholesale cost. Original 
Mutoscope Punching Bag A-1 $250.(X); 

Downey Johnson Coin Counter — Complete 
$ 1 50.00. Complete stock new & used Guns 
— Phonos — Pool Tables — Cigarette Ma- 
chines. PAUL A. LAYMON, INC., 1429 W. 
PICO, LOS ANGELES, CALIF., PHONE: 749- 
7351 


FOR SALE— Rock-Ola 1475, $135.00; 1497, 
$250.00; 426, $625.00; 432, $825.00; Mid. 
Monster Gun $245.(X); Seeburg Mustang, 
$495.00. Bird Music Dist., Inc., 124 Poyntz, 
Manhattan, Kansas, Area Code 913 PR 8- 
5229. 


BINGOS FOR EXPORT. ALL MODELS AVAIL- 
ABLE TO GOLDEN GATES: CLEAN PIN 
BALLS. DODGE CITY $300.00, FUN CRUISE 
$200.00, NORTH STAR $] 75.00, BOWLING 
QUEEN $150.00, EIGHT BALL $325.00, POT 
O GOLD $250.00, PARADISE $275.00. D. & 
P. MUSIC 27 PHILA., ST., YORK, PA. 


ADVERTISING 


SECTION 


CLASSIFIED AD RATE 20 CENTS PER WORD 

Coutit every word including oil words in firm name. Numbers in address count as 
accepted SS.OO. CASH OR CHECK MUST ACCOMPANY ALL 
ORDERS FOR CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING. If cash or check is not enclosed with order 
your classified ad will be held for following issue pending receipt of your cheek or cash. 

NOTICE— $72 Classified Advertisers. (Outside USA add S52 to your present subscription 
PI'®,?'' r “ entitled to a classified ad of 40 words in each week's issue for a period 
of One Full Year, 52 consecutive weeks. You are allowed to change your Classified Ad 
each week if you so desire. All words over 40 will be billed at the rate of 20c per 
word. Pleose count words carefully. Be sure your Classified Ad is sent to reach New York 
publication office by Wednesday, 12 Noon, of preceding week to appear in the follow- 
ing week's issue. — 

Classified Ads Close WEDNESDAY 

Send all copy to: CASH BOX, 1780 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 


BINGOS LARGEST STOCK IN THE COUNTRY 
For Export Uprights; AMI, Rockola & See- 
burg Phonos, Lite A Line, Shoot A Line, 
Lotto Fun, Track Odds, Twin Super Bells, 
Spot Bells. Crosse-Dunhom & Co., 225 
Wright Ave., Gretna, La. 70053. Phone: 367- 
4365 


WE HAVE A CHOICE SELECTION OF LATE 
Williams Two Players. Write for prices MID- 
WEST DIST., 709 LINWOOD BLVD.— KAN- 
SAS CITY. MO. 


FOR SALE— OVER 200 DIFFERENT MACHINES 
in stock, ready for location. Baseballs, guns, 
othletic, novelty, arcade, kiddie rides, etc. 
Give us a coll or stop in for one machine 
or mony. MIKE MUNVES CORP., 577 10th 
Avenue, NYC — phone 212 BR 9-6677. 


SEEBURG K200— $150, 161— $200, 222— 

$295, Gottlieb Ice Show — $275, United Duel, 
Bog Bonus, Zenith, Line Up, Shuffles. Moke 
Offer, STARK NOVELTY, CO., 239 30th 
Street N.W., Canton, Ohio, 44709. Coll: 
(216) 492-5382. 


WANT: RECORDS, 45's, USED OR NEW. ALSO 
LP stocks, any quantity. Will buy on steoOy 
basis. BEACON RECORD DISTRIBUTORS, 
725 BRANCH AVENUE, PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
02904. PHONE: UN- 1-7500 or JA-1-5121. 


USED 45 RPM RECORDS, ALL TYPES AS 
they run, right off the route. No sorting or 
picking. We pay freight from anywhere in 
U.S.A. Standing order available for regular 
shippers. JALEN AMUSEMENT CO., 1215 S. 
HOWARD STREET— BALTIMORE, MD 21230. 


RECORD RIOT, 45S, BRAND NEW RECORDS. 
Some late hits, S6.50 per 100, S65.00 per 
KXX). All orders shipped immediately. Send 
check with order for prepaid postage. Only 
in United States. RELIABLE RECORD CO., 
BOX 136, GLEN OAKS POST OFFICE, GLEN 
OAKS, N.Y. 11004 PHONE: (212 ) 343-5881. 


DISTRIBUTORS WANTED: BELCANTO RE- 
cords — The Great Singers — Caruso, Farrar, 
Suterlond, Stc. Catologue of 49-12" LP's. 
Write: EICHLER RECORD CORP., 815 
BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N.Y. 1003 


Music composed to your words by excellent 
composers on 50-50 ownership basis. Write : 
SOUND, BOX 833, MIAMI, FLORIDA 33135. 





i 

1 


VI 






4 


FIVE EXHIBITS: BIG BRONCO HORSE $150.00 
each, 1 Six-Shooter Gin, $75.00 ond 1 Gun 
Patrol Exhibits $75.00. CENTRAL MUSIC 
CO., 407 EAST AVENUE, D.P.O. BOX 284, 
KILEEN, TEXAS. 


POKERING, RECONDITIONED, REFINISHED IN 
Blond Birch, with new drop chute, points, 
sockets, wire, knock off, trim, bock-gloss, 
playfield decals. Write for details. New 
socket and point drop board wired for your 
gomes. JAMES TRAVIS — P.O. BOX 206— 
MILLVILLE, N.J. 08332. 


FOR SALE: 25 ASSORTED NEW ALBUMS: 
$15.00. Our Choice Guaranteed New 33 '/a 
RPM LP Albums — Mailed Insured— Post- 
paid — Limited Sole Offer Good Only in 
USA. Send Check or Money Order — No 
COD'S. UNCLE JI.M O'NEAL— BOX A — 
ARCADIA, CALIF. 91006. 


FOR EXPORT — All makes and models late 
phonographs, pin games and vending equip- 
ment. Write for our latest bulletin. AD- 
VANCE DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, 4710 
Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, Missouri (314) FO 
1-1050), Cable Address ADCOIN. 


30 BINGOS, 20 TURF KINGS (TO BE SOLD 
in Virginia only), 25 Novelties, 4 Guns, 4 
Shuffles, 3 Baseballs, Lord's Prayer. Coll or 
write E. L. SIMMONS, DANVILLE AMUSE- 
MENT CO., 620 WESTOVER DR., DAN- 
VILLE, VA. Phone: 792-5044. 


FOR SALE: 19 NEW TWIN DRAGON MA- 
chines (Keeney) and 25 used ones. These 
hove cosh payout units but ore easily con- 
verted to free ploy, also 70 Bally Grand 
Stands like new. SASKATCHEWAN COIN 
MACHINE CO., 1025-104 STREET, NORTH 
BATTLEFORD, SASKATCHEWAN, CANADA 
PHONE 445-2989. AREA CODE 306. 


FOR SALE: Late model Seeburg phonographs, 
Williams games and United shuffle alleys. 
Williams Double Play Baseball, as is, $125.(J0. 
RCSU4 steppers for Seeburg LPC-1 $49.95. 
Operators Sales, Inc., 4122 Washington Ave., 
New Orleans, Louisiana. 822-2370 (504). 


1 Keeney Rainbow 6 cord bingo gome in A-1 
condition. This machine is in storage in 
Chattanooga, Tenn. If you can use it make 
best offer to TRI-STATE DIST. BOX 615, 
ROME, GA. 30161, 


USED BALLY FRUIT SLOT MACHINES START- 
ing at $495 each, for export. We ore the 
Largest Supplier of Used Slot Machines in 
the world. Coll, Write, Wire: NEVADA FRUIT 
SLOT MACH. CO., P.O. BOX 5734, RENO, 
NEVADA, 702-329-3932. 


FOR SALE — RECONDITIONED BARGAINS- 
AMI-JCI (100 Sell (Mechanical) $195.00- 
Wurlitzer 2150 (200 Sell $145.00; 2204 
(100 Sell $145.00; Bally Loop the Loop (2 
pi.) $375.00; Challenger Bowler 14' $95.00 
United Team Bowling Alley 14' $50.00 
Mickey Anderson Amusement Co., 314 East 
11th St., Erie, Pa. Phone: 452-3207. 


'FOR SALE: 22ft. American Shuffleboords, re- 
conditioned with refinished alleys. Coll or 
write: TOLEDO COIN MACHINE, 814 Summit 
St., Toledo, Ohio 43604. Tel: (419) 243- 
7191." 


PANORAM USERS — Theatres — 12 RCA Pan- 
orams 16mm Movie Machines. Beautiful con- 
dition — $600. Used Film: $8.00 B & W 400 
ft. rolls. 225 Origirtal Negatives art girlie 
film. Ideol for theatres & arcades. Money 
makers. R. Richter — 1063 Market St., San 
Francisco, Calif. 94103. 


FOR SALE: Bally Champion Horses $375. Tusko 
Horses $295. Thoroughly Reconditioned. Call 
or Write: UNITED DIST. INC. 902 W. SEC- 
OND ST.. WICHITA, KANSAS 67203. 


FOR SALE: UNITED SHUFFLES— Mombo $450. 
Cheetah $495. WANT: Seeburg LPC-1 and 
IB. MOHAWK SKILL GAMES CO., 67 Swag- 
gertown Rd., Scotia, N.Y. 12302. 


FOR SALE: 2 FOOSBALLS GERMAN SIEGER 
Turnier $225 each; Chicago Coin Citation 
puck bowler $395 and United Circus ball 
bowler $195 both with traveling lights. 
Budge Wright's Western Distributors, 1226 
SW 16th. Portland, Oregon, 228-7565. 


"FOR SALE: Bally . . . Mills . . . Jennings . . . 
Pace Slots. Bally Bingos. WANTED: Used 
Uprights. BALLY DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, 
P.O. Box 7457, Reno, Nevada. Telephone: 
702-323-6157." 


FOR EXPORT, Wurlitzer Phonographs. All 
Models 100 or 200 selections. Sandler Vend- 
ing Company, 236 Girard Ave., North Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 55405. 


FOR SALE — Sing Alongs, $350.00; Ship Mates, 
$195.00; Royal Guards, $365.00; Apxsllos, 
$325.00; Beat Times, $395.(W; Double Plays, 
$85.00, Deluxe Fun Cruises, $175.00; Flying 
Saucer Guns, $425.00; Rifle Champs, 
$195.(X);, Texas Ranger Guns, $225 .(50,- 
Satellite Kiddie Rides, $275.00; Time Trials, 
$90.00. Also large stock of bingos. NEW 
ORLEANS NOVELTY CO. 1055 DRYADES 
AVE. NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA, 70113, 
TEL: (504) 529-7321. CABLE: NONOVCO. 


FAWN 21 COL. CIG. $95.00. 3 ROWE 7 COL. 
candy $150.00 all. Stoner 10 col. candy 
$100.00. World Fair Rifle $250.00. Seeb. 
G's & C's cheap. Write Jules Olshein at 
Greco Bros. 1288 B'woy. Albany, New York. 
Coll: HO 5-0228. 


FOR SALE — For sale New "SOCK' O" amuse- 
ment gomes. City and State distributorships 
ovoilable. Write *'SOCK' 0," 1704 N.E. 14th 
Portland, Oregon. 


RECORDS-MUSIC 


WANT: RECORDS, 45's and LP's Surplus re- 
turns, overstock cut-outs, etc. Call or Write: 
HARRY WARRINER AT: KNICKERBOCKER 
MUSIC CO., 453 McLean Ave., Yonkers, New 
York 10705, GR 6-7778. 


Former Florida-based associate producer and 
technical adviser for 3 million selling record 
now in New York City. Available for produc- 
tion assignments anywhere in U.S.A. Terms: 
one-shot or contract deals. Contact John 
Brumage (212) 255-4803. 


45 RPM RECORDS, NEW. NO QUANTITY TOO 
large or small. Highest prices ixiid. Write 
stating quantity on hand. TONY GALGANO 
DIST. CO., 4135 W. ARMITAGE, CHICAGO 
39, ILL. (Tel. Dickens 2-7060). 


Aggressive Canadian Distributor seeks exclusive ^ 
Canada Wide representotion of piopulor lines 
of records. Write CASH BOX, Box #814, 
1780 B'woy., New York, NY 10019. | 


<1 




ACE LOCKS KEYED ALIKE. SEND LOCKS AND ' 
the key you wont them mastered to $1.(X) 1 

each less 10% lots of 50 or more. RAN DEL 
LOCK SERVICE, 61 ROCKAWAY AVENUE. 1 
VALLEY STREAM, N.Y. 11580. TEL: 516- * 

VA 5-6216. Our 35th year in vending. 


ATTENTION POOL TABLE OPERATORS— POP- / 
On Cue Tips fits all Brad Ferrules. 1 1 mm I 
& 12 mm. Amazing moterial, more friction, J, 
longer lasting. lOc each in quantities of 50. i 
Send check or M.O. to JEFCOR INDUSTRIES J 
INC., BOX 192, VALLEY STREAM, N.Y. ^ 


COIN MACHINE 
SERVICES 


IF IT'S PANORAM PARTS YOU WANT PHIL 
GOULD HAS 'EM. ALL TYPES OF FILMS 
FOR Ponorom Peeks. PHIL GOULD — 224 
MARKET ST.— NEWARK, N.J. (Tel. 201- 
MArket 4-3297). 


100 MM CONVERSIONS 20/700 ROWE 20/800 ^ 
Riviera, Celebrity. Do it yourself. 30 minute 
installation. 10 rear columns. $26.95 each. -<a 
Lots of 10 $24.95 each. Fully guaranteed. 
Detailed instructions included DON YOUNG 
COMPANY 14532 VANOWEN, VAN NUYS, 
CALIF. (213) 780-4339. 


ARCADE OPERATORS — 4x5 glossy photos. Just 
released. 30 all new Beaver Girl numbers. ^ 
10 poser fast seller — still only 50^. Use 
your letterhead for free sample. (Please, 
no collect phone colls). Peltcher's Photos, 
4781 El Cajon Blvd., Son Diego, Californio 
92115. 


EAGLE EYE BILLIARD CUES: Fiberglas shaft 
— full taper model — -trouble free joint — X’, 
pinned and epoxy construction — 57" $36.00 
per dozen, 52" $34.80 per dozen. Ask your 
distributor or write us direct. Ellicottville ■*(*' 
Wood Products Corp, P. O. Box 217, Ellicott- 
ville N. Y. 14731. 






"HOLLYWOOD GAG DIGEST" SUMMER ISSUE * 
— 1968. Clean, Topical, Yocks, Quips. We 
Service DJ's Only. Sample $3.00. Mention 
"Cosh Box" receive Bonus Gog Sheets, Freel 
E. W. MORRIS, 7047 Franklin, Hollywood, 
Calif. 90028. H 


MISC. 


DEEJAYS! 6,000 HILARIOUS CLASSIFIED 01^- 
liners, written expressly for radio, only $5.(X)! 

Or send $9.00 for above plus 5,000 addition- -i 
al "Clever Remarks!" Guaranteed to please 
you or money bock! Catalog of SO.CXX) pro- 
ressionol comedy lines tree, bdniuna Onm 
Mdriposo, Calif. 95338. 


000 PROFESSIONAL COMEDY LiNESI 
Largest lough library in show busing. 
Forty books of classified moterial, plus Or- 
ben's Current Comedy the newsmoking 
topical gog service feoturing hip deeja> 
lines in each issue. Great sample 
$5.00. Catalog free. ORBEN OEEJA> ^ 
LAUGHS, 3536 Daniel Crescent Boldwir 
Harbor, N.Y. 11510. 


78 


Cash Box — June 15, 1968 




Triangle Under 
Corporate Changes 
Takes On New Name 

NEWARK, N. J. — Under a corporate 
restructuring plan that went into ef- 
fect last week, Triangle Industries, 
Inc., formerly known as Triangle 
Conduit & Cable Co. Inc., assumed 
the role of a parent company for sev- 
en operating subsidiaries, it was an- 
nounced by Carl S. Menger, president 
and chairman of the board. 

Triangle’s shareholders approved 
the name change and restructuring 
at the annual meeting on May 7. 

Menger said that the restructuring 
“will provide greater flexibility, more 
cohesiveness, increased efficiency and 
will free up subsidiary managements 
to do what they know best — operate 
their companies on a day-to-day basis 
in their own competitive markets.” 
He added that the restructuring will 
also allow corporate management “to 
concentrate its efforts on planning 
and development programs for the 
longer range, particularly in the areas 
of further diversification and acqui- 
sitions.” 

Menger said that both the name 
change and the restructuring was nec- 
essai'y “in view of the company’s 
growth and the variety of fields in 
which the company is now active.” 
In addition to electrical wires, cables 
and conduit, which the company still 
manufactures. Triangle Industries has 
become an important producer of 
copper tube and fittings, brass and 
bronze alloys, various plastic products, 
pre-insulated pipe products, coated 
pipings, vending machines, coin- 
operated phonographs and accessories, 
background music equipment and ac- 
cessories and bill changer equipment. 
Triangle Industries is also involved in 
an extensive mineral exploration pro- 
gram both domestically and abroad. 

The more than 100 different pro- 
duct lines, manufactured by the com- 
pny’s subsidiaries, serve such mar- 
kets as electronics, cryogenics, chem- 
icals, space, nuclear, pollution control, 
automation, desalinization and the 
consumer-oriented field. 

In addition to Triangle Conduit & 
Cable Co. Inc., the other subsidiaries 
of Triangle Industries are The Plastic 
Wire & Cable Corporation, Rowe In- 
ternational, Inc., International Pro- 
tected Metals, Inc., Triangle Explora- 
tion, Inc., Magnetic Propulsion Sys- 
tems, Inc., and Raceways, Inc. Each 
of the subsidiaries will be an inde- 
pendent profit center, each with its 
own president and other necessary 
staff officers. 


Five West Coast Op's 
Stage Wurl. Service 
School With Hicks 

LOS ANGELES, California — Five 
well-known Wurlitzer operators of the 
Los Angeles area conducted individual 
schools for their service technicians. 
Cooperating companies included Har- 
den Music of Pleasant Hill; Acme 
Vending, Tempo Sales, and Morgan 
Amusement of San Jose; and Penin- 
sula Music of Seaside. 

These Wurlitzer service schools are 
held periodically in order to bring the 
service technicians up-to-date on the 
latest improvements in servicing, in 
addition to giving them the opportuni- 
ty of availing themselves of profes- 
sional assistance in dealing with the 
variety of problems with which they, 
as servicemen, will be confronted in 
the phonograph business. 

Professional mentor of the Wur- 
litzer Company service schools is 
Leonard Hicks, field service represen- 
tative for the company’s western ter- 
ritory. Hicks spent only one day in 
each of the cities he visited. Demon- 
strations and discussions therefore 
had to be limited in both time and 
subject matter. 

Who Was There? 

The California service technicians 
who participated in the service school 
were: Dave Harden, Ross Thomas, 
Jim Harden, Vito and Joe Adragna, 



World's Greatest Soccer Game 


VISIBLE CONTROL 

panel, at convenient hand-rest level, eliminates "feel 
and fumble” and player fatigue, permits players to 
keep their eyes on their teams without glancing down 
to locate desired control, adds to play appeal. 

ADJUSTABLE PLAY TIME 


Approved for License 

IN 

CHICAGO, DETROIT, NEW YORK 


FITS IN PINBALL SPACE 

Only 31 in. wide, 55 in. long, 37 in. high, WORLD CUP fits wherever a 
pinball game fits, goes where pinballs don’t go, lives longer on location 
than a pool table, earns bigger, faster money, month after month and 
year after year, than any other equipment outside of the bingo class. 


Play continues until one player scores maximum of 19 
goals or play period expires. Standard VA minute play 
time gives players an exciting work-out, stimulates 
repeat play. But play time is easily adjusted up to 5 
minutes in 'A minute intervals. Operator can tailor the 
play and profit to requirements of location, time of day, 
season or other factors. 

OPTIONAL PLAY PRICING 


Players charge opponent's goal, 
dribble back for strategic play 
and k-i-c-k to left and right! 


WORLD CUP is The Soccer Game, the 
soccer game with built-in flexibility 
which permits players to match every 
maneuver of real soccer. Straight drives. 
Forward passes. Lateral passes. Field 
goals. Corner kicks. Sometimes actually 
skull kicks! Players run in both 
directions. Kick right and left while 
running either way. Or while standing 
still. The Ya in. solid Lucite ball, white 


for maximum visibility on the green, 
brightly illuminated field, insures the 
positive impact action that keeps the 
play at a fast and thrilling pace. Small 
size of ball in relation to 3 in. tall lifelike 
players adds to the realism and quick 
response to every sudden decision of 
the contesting players. WORLD CUP is 
the world’s finest, simplest, fastest soccer 
game. WORLD CUP is soccer. 


Single deposit permits two to play in competition. 
Available for 2 Nickels per Game, 2 Dimes per Game, 
1 Quarter per Game, and coins of all nations. 


A dozen words 

are all the instructions WORLD CUP 
needs. “Player moves in direction 
handle is moved. Press handle down 
to kick.” Goalie control dial, which 
moves Goalie left and right across 
goal, is too obvious for words. 


Win the big money cup! 
Get WORLD CUP today! 


See your distributor or write BALLY MANUFACTURING CORPORATION • 2640 BELMONT AVENU% CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60618, U.S.A: ' 


Bud Clark, Phil Giadone, Dominic 
Morganti, Leland Jaden, Thomas 
Harder, M. Stanley, Frank Guidicessi, 
Billy Dallas, Walt Barker, Bill Nicola 
and Jack Rose. 

With the use of the Wurlitzer 
Americana II Phonograph, Leonard 
Hicks gave a thorough demonstration 


on the subject of Trouble Shooting. 
At the same time he emphasized the 
fact, “If the phonographs on your 
routes are not serviced properly, and 
are not able to play, they’re not 
going to pay off in profits. You’re go- 
ing to be the loser as well as your 
boss, and the location-owners.” 


At the conclusion of the last service 
school which was held in Seaside, 
the five Wurlitzer operators held a 
combined party for Leonard Hicks 
and the sixteen service technicians 
who attended the school. Cocktails 
and dinner were enjoyed at one of 
the downtown Los Angeles hotels. 






New Victor Soundtrack Album 






StNSiSS (N THE ORiaiNAl SOUHOTMCK AL80M 
FflOM THE MeR8-80LflWYH-«AYEB PICTURE 


BiLIBIXBr 

liMi fiORDOlf 
WIIIAM SCHALltRT 
VICTORIA MEyFRINK 
ROSS HAGFN 
GARLIAUANTIW 


BIIKCTEB 8? 888JSAS TABDM 


aPEcs!*Si m Tms - 

iA»CfSlii.T8is«s* 

"WiiiRiitfsaF 


• iMh A* f 

*> •vmvMsn'MMimuiMiM 


immmercmmmi^ 

t/mmmiimrnmUtya 

mimsmmimmt. 


wra»*«i, 


LPM/LSP-3989 


iPttH.-JAJ